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Documents filtered by: Author="Peale, Charles Willson"
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on the receipt of your letter I hastened to the City to seek the Inkstand you wanted, I beleive no nearer to your direction could be had in the City, than I have sent, I put two of them in one package and delivered it at the Post office, directed to you at Monticello. That most likely to answer probably may be sunk deeper by cutting out some of the wood beneath, and a little grinding down of...
Long oppressed under duty, respect and friendship, in having omited to write to you about the Plow which you so obligingly sent me. The principle on which the form is given is undoubtably excellent, as the action is by strait lines, yet without a proper length is given to the mould board, all its advantages are lost. I made repeated tryals of this Plow by an expert farmer at home, and also...
In the hope, my dear Sir, of giving you some little amusement on what I conceive an interesting subject, which my Son Rembrandt. has very nealy completed for the Public Eye, Therefore I have made a Sketch of his Picture, enclosed, and trouble you once more with my address. and a description of “ Peal’s great Moral Picture the Court of Death ,” Thom Porter’s Poem on Death. The under figures...
Yours of 28 th Ulto. received, yesterday, and coming home last night I thought of my small Polygraph, which was made for a traveling conveniency, I find one exactly what you want. therefore it gives me pleasure to send them. I have long thought on the means to preserve health, and have made many experiments to ascertain what would be the best food, as well as drink—and as I enjoy perfect...
Your favor of the 22 d instant I received yesterday, and devolving in my mind what I could best do to serve you , determined to take the springs from my traveling Poligraph, made of Brass wire, which perhaps are better than those made of Silver, unless the silver should have considerable of Alloy, and the wire drawn very hard. I believe I have some of the Wire left of which your springs are...
Herewith I send your silver springs for your Pollygraph according to my promise in my last letter, I do not know whether they are of the proper length, but I know your talents to render them what they ought to be. By the public papers I find the accident you meet with in a fall, I hope by this time that a cure is made of your arm. and, I have read with pleasure your letter to M r Adams in...
Although it is a long time since I have wrote, yet be assured that I very often think on the favors you have confered on me at various periods, and could I have been so fortunate as to think I could add a moment of pleas ure to you. I should have embraced the occasion, But absorbed in the various labours of the Museum, the attentions of duty to a large family, that look to me for aid on every...
It was my intention to have paid you a visit when I left Philad a I had proposed to myself to commence this journey in the first of May as the better season, but my youngest son Titian was so much indisposed that he could not attend to the business of the Museum, and another call for his improvement now obliges me to return to Philadelphia. A gentleman from England by the name of Cha s...
It has for some time past that I have promised myself the pleasure of paying you a Visit, yet the situation of my family and the interests of the Museum has not allowed me that indulgence. My Son Titian has not only great skill in preserving all kinds of Animals, but also he has acquired an abundance of knowledge in Natural history, I mean of animated nature. And my Son Franklin is possessed...
When I received your Polygraph, I repaired the springs, then made an essay to write with it, found it stiff—but on putting oil to all the joints, it preformed much better. so that my conclusion was that you neglected to give it oil occasionally. My next opperation was to take the parralells apart in order to examine all the joints—and it does not appear to have worn the pin-holes, indeed I...