You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Peale, Charles Willson
  • Recipient

    • Jefferson, Thomas

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Peale, Charles Willson" AND Recipient="Jefferson, Thomas"
Results 1-10 of 123 sorted by date (ascending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
Was I under a mistake in expecting the favor of your sitting at One O’clock this day? You will oblige me in appointing the time that will be most convenient, to yourself. I have a great desire to exert my abilities in this portrait, and your indulgence will grately obligate Honored Sir your very Humble Servt., FC ( PPAP : Peale Letter Book); in Peale’s hand; undated, but the letter immediately...
Your favor of sitting today will oblige Your very Hble Servt., FC ( PPAP : Peale Letter Book); in Peale’s hand; undated except as above, but the letter succeeding this one was written after an illness and apparently after some lapse of time on 12 Jan. 1792. The one immediately preceding it is the note to TJ printed at 3 Dec. 1791. Neither Peale’s two notes nor TJ’s presumed replies are...
The first object of my Life is the inrichment of my Museum, In this view, I mean to continue my labours of preserving Duplicates of American Subjects for the purpose of exchanging them for those of other Countries, altho’ I have been rather unfortunate in an attempt of this kind with Sweden —It is 6 years since I sent, by the recommendation of my friend Dr. Collin, some preserved Birds: This...
Last June I received a Letter from you, respecting an exchange of the Subjects of Natural History, that the Hereditary Prince of Parma was desireous of making. I answered your Letter in the same month (which I hope was received) and although I have had other avocations, such as Bridge building &c., yet I have made a beginning in this work and I have preserved such subjects as have occasionly...
The terms of approbation with which you mention my Lecture and Museum , afford me much gratification; since I have scarcely a thought not devoted to the perfection of my scheme. From my knowledge of the Interest which you have always felt in whatever concerned the comfort of Man or the Benefits of Society, I am induced to think that even in the important Station to which our Nation has called...
It gives me pleasure to inform you that I am so far on my return to the Museum with the Bones which were lately dug up at Shawangunk, in the county of Ulster. with the purchase of these I have also the right from the owner of the land to take up the remainder, when I can be prepared to undertake so important a work. I have viewed the Grounds, and have laid my plan, or rather plans to overcome,...
Believing you would be pleased in knowing my success in a trip up the north river, by the purchase of the Bones in the possession of Mr. Mastens. Although an object of great importance to me, in undertaking the journey I had very faint prospects of the issue. On my return to New York elated with the hopes of seeing the Skeleton of the Mamoth put togather, I hastily wrote to inform you of my...
Your favour of the 29th. July I did not receive until I had reached the place of bones, when I should have been pleased to have answered it, had it been possible or proper to have taken my attentions from engagments so earnest & constant. The use of a powerful Pump might have saved me 50 or 60 Dollars expence, but perhaps the obligation to return one belonging to the Public in a limited time,...
The laborious, tho’ pleasing task of mounting the Mammoth Skeleton being done, gives me leisure to attend to other Interests of the Museum. The constant accumulation of articles not only of this but also of other Countries—increasing my imbarrisments to know how to dispose them for exhibition and public utility—these difficulties I expect will be greatly encreased after my Sons have visited...
The time is now fully arrived when it has become expedient to decide the fate of the Museum to which Pennsylvania has given birth. It has commanded every exertion in my power for 16 years, and meeting with public approbation has certainly arrived to considerable Maturity; but from the uncertain tenure of human life it may not long continue in the same circumstances in which it has progressed,...