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The enclosed is a copy of a paper which was some time in your hands, which you turned over to the Treasury & it was afterwards assigned to me. In an attempt to with Robinson’s estate they claim a credit for £396.10 said to be paid to Gibson & Jefferson in Nov r 1800. G & J. say they received the money & gave you credit for it. I was only disposed to admit a credit for the three sums stated on...
I return the bond executed by me you may rely with the most absolute certainty upon me to prevent your having to advance any thing. I will take care to pay the interest which being done regularly I understand the principal will not be demanded but at the periods that the money will be due for my property. It is to me the most afflicting thing of my life, that I shou’d have involved you above...
I have the mortification to inform you, that the information I gave you of the consent of the Bank to let my paper continue with your endorsation alone, was a mistake. I was lead into this error by the information of two of the directors and it wou’d have been so I have no doubt, but unfortunately the Va. Bank, after giving every other accommodation that I asked as to time & c required another...
It is with the greatest pain & mortification I communicate to you that I was obliged to suffer a protest the day before yesterday. Until within a few days of its happening I was under no fear of it; I made every effort in my power to prevent it but without effect. The people who have money think they can not get its value & those who have it not in hand, will not make engagements for money. My...
Under cover to M r Dandridge I inclose two notes which you will be so good as to indorse, and after sealing my letter, you will be pleased to give it the earliest conveyance—by the mail to Richmond. In answering this kindness to me, be pleased again to accept the strongest assurances, that whether I live or die, you nor yours, shall never receive the slightest inconvenience from your goodness...
The misfortunes of our friends in Baltimore, and the dreadful state of commerce all the world over, has determined my son to break up his establishment at Leghorn, & return to the U.S. as soon as he can wind up his business which he expects to be able to do in a few weeks after he gets there He expects there will be a considerable naval depot at Pensacola, where he is disposed to settle. He is...
I enclose two notes which I beg the favour of you to endorse for me & return by the first mail. I ought to have done it by the last mail but it escaped me. Two of my daughters & my grand child will leave this for Milton the first good day. what can or ought to be done to alleviate the distress of the country at the present moment? So the question asked by every man I see, but no man answers...
On account of the uncertainty of what cou’d be gotten from the Banks, after writing to you, I advised M r Gibson, to apply at the N. J. B so as to take the chance at both. your note was done there for over half the sum, on that day it wou’d not have been done for any other man for any part, but it was done with the understanding it wou’d be paid when due. On account of that circumstance, I...
$10,000 Sixty days after date I promise to pay Thomas Jefferson Esq r or order without offset negotiable & payable at the office of the Bank of the United States at Richmond ten thousand dollars for value received ViU : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
M r Gibson has stated to me your wish to obtain a loan favor the Bank of the U. S. (at this place) of an additional sum. From particular circumstances there is a great unwillingness at this moment to make loans for a longer period than sixty days. I have therefore advised him to let the application be made at the Farmers Bank, where my brother thinks it wou’d be obtained without any...
This letter will be delivered to you by M r Arthur Brockenbrought, who I anxiously hope you will be able to employ on some Terms or other, I wish it most on your account, as I am sure he wou’d save you much trouble & vexation. I enclose two notes which you will be so good as to endorse & return to me by the mail. DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
I have not been able to see M r Brokenborough, but expect M r Garnet, will carry you a communication from him. I am very anxious you shou’d get him on every account, but particularly on your account. If you know not such a man your trouble will be endless, and after all I fear even if you go there every day, The work will not be done in a manner satisfactory to you, & I fear too at a greater...
I have just heard that M r Arthur Brockenborough, is willing to engage with you to do the carpenter’s work at the University & wou’d undertake the superintendence of all your work of every sort at that place. M r Brockenborough is the brother of the Doctor & the Judge, & like them is a man of excellent character. He is a compleat workman himself and is moreover said to be more scientific than...
You have heard I know, that your College is made the University of Virginia . I call it yours, as you are its real founder, its commencement can only be ascribed to you, to your exertions & influence its being adopted can only be attributed. The object was always dear to me, it is doubly so, as it is now so compleatly identified with your fame. The sum given is too small but it will be...
The first of the two notes you were so good as to endorse for me will come round by the time I get to Richmond . I enclose two others which you will be pleased to endorse. RC ( DLC ); dateline at foot of text; endorsed by TJ as received 13 Nov. 1818 from North Milton and so recorded in SJL . Enclosures not found.
I was sincerely concerned to hear of your indisposition: On saturday it gave me infinite pleasure to hear you had recovered. Will you pardon me if I take the liberty to entreat you, to spare your self the fatigue & exposure you so frequently encounter. Your life is too precious to be risqued. But for your indisposition, I wou’d last week have sent you the enclosed with a request that you wou’d...
Under cover to M r Dandridge I enclose two notes which you will be so good as to endorse, and after sealing my letter, you will be pleased to give it the earliest conveyance by the mail to Richmond . In renewing this kindness to me, be pleased again to accept the strongest assurances, that whether I live or die, you nor yours, shall never receive the slightest inconvenience from your goodness...
I am about to take a liberty with you, that I hope you will pardon. Before I do, I beg you to understand, it is sincerely my wish, that you shou’d not comply with the request, I am ab o ut to make, if it shou’d be either inconvenient or unpleasant to you, in any respect. I want the use of a sum of money for a short time, I can obtain it from one of the Banks, but to do so, I Must have an...
My first impression after receiving your letter , in answer to mine about M r Coffee , was that I wou’d not let him go; on account of your reluctance, but upon more reflection, I determined otherwise. I had experienced that he did not give much trouble, I was sure he wou’d give an excellent likeness , and was satisfied it wou’d be a great gratification to thousands of your country men to...
I have this moment received your letter of the 26 th instant . I have mentioned to as many of the directors as I have seen, your wish to obtain a further accommodation at our office of $3000. It is their opinion as well as mine, that it will give the board pleasure to comply with your request. Much country paper (I mean exclusively) has been done, it is however contained . but how long this...
a M r Coffee , a sculptor of great eminence who is here, is very anxious to go to your house to take your Bust: I have promised him I wou’d make his wishes known to you. He is said to be a master in his art: Your friends feel a solicitude you shou’d indulge him . nothing can be more acceptable to the american people, than the preservation of the likeness of those of our Citizens, most...
As soon as I came to Richmond , after receiving your letter of the 19 th of march , in which you express a wish to have that part of Col Byrd ’s journal printed that I sent to you, I applied to M r Thomas Taylor , the agent & friend of the family, to obtain the permission, he promised to do so and there was no doubt it wou’d be readily given. In consequence of your letter of the 10 th instant...
I have written to M r Harrison for his permission to print the work of Col. Byrd , that I Sent you, I have no doubt he will consent to it, I am satisfied your wishes will be conclusive, & that the family of Col. Byrd will be highly gratified. When I received your answer to my application about the consulate at Leghorn for my son, I at once abandoned all thoughts of it, as nothing can induce me...
The situation that I have been in for some time past has prevented my answering your last letter and making my acknowledgements for your friendly attention to M r Armistead . I have the pleasure to inform you, your application procured M r A. an appointment that if he is prudent will enable him to support his family. A long and intimate acquaintance with you has given me a thorough knowledge...
I feel the utmost reluctance to address you upon a subject of a personal nature or about one with whom I am nearly connected. My feelings & distress are such, that I cannot forbear to do it, and I trust to your goodness to pardon the liberty I am about to take. The eldest son of my brother George, who has serv’d in the Army eight years & risen to the command of a Regt. has been involved in...
I have the honor to inform you that you are appointed one of the Visitors of the Central College in Albemarle, and to forward you the enclosed Commission. It is hoped that it will not be inconvenient for you to undertake the Execution of this office. I am, Sir, With great respect, Your Humble Servant DLC : Papers of James Madison.
I have the honor to inform you that you are appointed one of the Visitors of the Central College in Albemarle , and to forward you the enclosed commission . It is hoped that it will not be inconvenient for you to undertake the execution of this office. RC ( DLC ); in a clerk’s hand, signed by Nicholas ; at foot of text: “ Thomas Jefferson , Esq.”; endorsed by TJ as received 31 Oct. 1816 and so...
Virginia , to wit:— Whereas, by an Act of the General Assembly , Passed the 14 h day of February 1816, intitled, “An act for establishing a College in the County of Albemarle ,” it is made the duty of the Governor for the time being, as Patron of the said College , to appoint Visitors thereof—Therefore, I, Wilson C. Nicholas , Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia , do, in pursuance of the...
I feel great reluctance in giving you this trouble, of what I consider a personal application. The second daughter of my sister Norton (who you may remember at Mr. Randolph’s) married a Mr. Armistead, a gentn. who was bred a Merchant, but was unfortunate in business and obliged to retire to the country, where he has for several years supported his family by his labour. The event of a law suit...
I feel great reluctance at asking of you what from its nature I fear cannot be very agreeable. I am confident I ought not to impoze so much trouble upon you. I trust however you will pardon me if it shou’d not be agreeable to you to interest yourself for a family, with which I am nearly connected. my Eldest sister you know married M r Norton & had the fairest prospects in point of fortune. The...