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    • Nicholas, Wilson Cary
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Documents filtered by: Author="Nicholas, Wilson Cary" AND Recipient="Madison, James"
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I was charged by Mr. Charles Pinckney of South Carolina, with a message to you that entirely escaped my memory when I had the pleasure of seeing you; he begs that you will write to Colo. W. Hampton, and urge him to exert himself to secure the vote of S. Carolina to Mr. Jefferson, (if they vote for Genl. Pinckney, they had as well not vote for Mr. Jefferson). Mr. Pinckney so frequently...
Every man who loves his country must feel great uneasiness at the defects that have been discovered in our constitution, in the short time that it has been in operation and must doubt its permenence when he recollects that in the 12th. year of its age, it was in the agony of death, that it was on the point of expiring under its own forms—that a similar state of things may be produced at any...
The President once mentioned to me that he expected he shou’d find it necessary to remove the Post master Genl. from his office; at that time he spoke of a respectable gent. who he had thought of for that place, this conversation took place early in the winter, I do not know what his determination, may now be, if it shou’d be to make a change in that department, and he wou’d confide it to me I...
I beg leave to introduce to you Mr. Joseph Daviess the district attorney for Kentuckey, he is a man of merit, and one who has the strongest claims upon me for all the good offices that I can do him, from the extraordinary attention that he has paid to the interest of My brothers family, there is nothing I cou’d do for Mr. D. that wou’d be so acceptable to him, as making him acquainted with...
You have laid me under the greatest obligations. The favour that you have done me will be forever remembered. The caution that you suggest shall be observed. I wou’d rather suffer any inconvenience than you shou’d ever have cause to regret this instance of your friendship to me. You will observe the blanks as to date and sight; I did not know how to fill them up with out seeing one of the...
I have in a few days past received from Virginia $2500, which will prevent the necessity of my availing myself to the utmost extent of your goodness to me. I now only want $2000, for which I have sent a note. Be pleased to return it by the bearer. I am Dear Sir your hum. Serv. RC ( DLC ). Docketed by JM. Filed with the RC is an undated promissory note, in Nicholas’s hand but with signature...
The enclosed letter was sent to me by Genl. Marshal, who begs that you will send it under cover to Mr. Livingston with a request that he will give it a conveyance. I have obtained a list of all the French Vessels that were captured by the vessels of the U. S. upon comparing that list with your report I find it contains upwards of twenty vessels not included in your report, I have marked all...
14 September 1804, Warren. “It gives me great pleasure to hear that you and Mrs. Madison, are to be in our neighbourhood; Mrs Nicholas and myself woud have met you at Col. Coles this day, but for an indisposition that I have had for some days, and from which I have not sufficiently recovered to venture out. We promise ourselves the pleasure of seeing you and Mrs. Madison at Warren, and that...
I have endeavoured to ascertain how the votes wou’d be in the Senate upon the nomination of Mr. Galatin. My information is that there are seventeen votes against him—ten gentn. will vote for him, some of them reluctantly, and that there are seven doubtful votes. This information is obtained through sources not friendly to Mr. G—— but I fear it is correct as to the number of votes he will lose,...
19 October 1809, Warren. Introduces Maj. James Morrison of Kentucky, “one of the most respectable of the revolutionary Officers, and one of the most amiable men I am acquainted with.” RC ( DLC ). 1 p. Nicholas was nearing the end of his service as a Virginia congressman (he resigned on 27 Nov.).
When I was in Richmond lately, it was said Judge Griffin, wou’d probably, never be able to take his seat on the bench again. Will you pardon me if I take the liberty to place before you the name of a Gentn. as his successor, with whom you are as well acquainted as I am? I am far from expecting or wishing more than that, his fitness for the office, shou’d be decided by a comparison with others...
When at war with the only nation that has the means of serious annoyance, to have the force of the nation impaired if not neutralized by faction, heaps upon the government difficulties that are almost insurmountable. With the maratime ascendency of G.B. it cannot be doubted she is able to make us feel most sorely her power. Grievous as she has and may continue to make the war, I feel more...
I had the pleasure two days ago to receive your favour of the 27th. of November. I beg you to be assured I feel great regret at the cause of the delay in your writing to me and anxiously hope your health is now perfectly restored. I understand communications to the Executive of the U.S ought properly to be addressed to the heads of departments these I shall make with pleasure. At the same time...
The fortunate and happy restoration of peace, has caused all those whose patriotism alone induced them to engage in the military service of their country, to resume their former occupations. Of that number is my son Robert Carter Nicholas, lately a Lt. Col in the army of the U.S. When the war commenced he had lately returned from Italy, where he had been twelve or eighteen months, with a very...
I had the pleasure to receive your favour of the 2d. instant at this place a few days past. When my son desired to be named for the consulate at Leghorn, he beleived that office was or wou’d be vacant. Under the same impression, I took the liberty to make the application to you in his favour, contained in my letter from Richmond. I am sure Sir, you beleive me incapable of wishing a deserving...
After the indecent attack that was made upon you in Congress in the course of the last Session, you will not be surprised to hear that efforts are made in conversation to lessen your popularity. I will not repeat to you what has been said, because there is abundant evidence in the possession of every man to contradict most of the calumnies in circulation. Indeed your life has been so pure that...
The distress of the people of this country under the embargo, is and will be such, that every effort ought to be made to convince them not only of the propriety but the necessity of that measure. In the various communications to Congress, and the publications in the news papers, the justification of this measure is to be found. Unfortunately there is such a Mass before the people, that the...
At the beginning of the session we cou’d have carried any plan connected with the repeal of the Embargo in the course of it. It has been our misfortune that the various expedients have been offered too late. The only honorable course was from Embargo to non-I ntercourse . We cannot now obtain it, and I fear we must submit to the plan least disgraceful, in which we can unite the greatest number...
Some of our friends have a great anxiety that the non intercourse law should expire at the end of the next session of Congress, and that a clause shou’d be added to the bill repealing all the embargo laws at the same time. You seemed to disapprove of it, and I have given no encouragement to the idea. Mumford & Masters say if this is done all the New Yorkers will vote for the bill, and the New...
My reason for mentioning to you this Morning the subject we conversed about, was that this is the mail day for Detroit, so that if you wished it you might have it in your power to counteract the effects of the intimation that has been given. It is said the Gentn. who is appointed a general in New-York, will not accept the appointment. Perhaps this appointment wou’d be accepted as full...
I have endeavoured to ascertain how the notes wou’d be in the Senate upon the nomination of Mr. Galatin to be Secretary of State. My information is that there are seventeen votes against him—ten Gentn. will vote for him, some of them reluctantly, and that there are seven doubtful votes. This information is obtained through sources not friendly to Mr. G —— but I fear it is correct as to the...
I have the honor to enclose to you a resolution of the Assembly of the State of Virginia, instructing the Governor of the Commonwealth earnestly and respectfully to submit to you, the importance of effectually providing for the defence of the Chesapeake Bay. Your knowledge of the Chesapeake cCountry, its population, the value of its products and its importance in a political and commercial...
As you no doubt are informed, the last assembly made large appropriations of money to the internal improvement of this state. To ensure the judicious application of this money, it is essential that we shou’d be able to command the services of one or more able civil engineers. Among the citizens of this state, I have looked in vain for such a man, and I fear there is no native of the U.S....
Be pleased to accept my cordial thanks for the inquiries you have made as to an engineer for this state. I am obliged to Mr. Latrobe for the information he has given it is very satisfactory and will be useful. Before I wrote to you I took the liberty to enclose to the secretary of State a letter to Mr. Adams, and to request the secretary to have inquiries made through our minister, as to the...
Nothing could induce me to give you so much trouble, but a belief that your desire to serve our Country will cause you to pardon it. An act of the last Assembly directs an accurate Map of the State to be made from actual surveys. I am anxious to have it well done and as economically as possible. With these views, I should be very glad to avail myself of any surveys made or to be made by the...
By a resolution of the General Assembly of Virginia, the President and Directors of the Literary Fund are requested to digest and report a system of public education, calculated to give effect to the appropriations made to that object by the Legislature, and to comprehend in such system the establishment of one University, and such additional Colleges, Academies and Schools, as shall diffuse...
I feel great reluctance in giving you this trouble, of what I consider a personal application. The second daughter of my sister Norton (who you may remember at Mr. Randolph’s) married a Mr. Armistead, a gentn. who was bred a Merchant, but was unfortunate in business and obliged to retire to the country, where he has for several years supported his family by his labour. The event of a law suit...
I have the honor to inform you that you are appointed one of the Visitors of the Central College in Albemarle, and to forward you the enclosed Commission. It is hoped that it will not be inconvenient for you to undertake the Execution of this office. I am, Sir, With great respect, Your Humble Servant DLC : Papers of James Madison.
I feel the utmost reluctance to address you upon a subject of a personal nature or about one with whom I am nearly connected. My feelings & distress are such, that I cannot forbear to do it, and I trust to your goodness to pardon the liberty I am about to take. The eldest son of my brother George, who has serv’d in the Army eight years & risen to the command of a Regt. has been involved in...