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This will be delivered to you by Col: Tatham who I have known for more than 20. years, at first a clerk of the council at Richmond. I have seen him here from my arrival to this period, frequently, and at his request, as he is about setting out for America, give him this to you. I consider him as a firm friend to the UStates of wh. he is a citizen, being there thro the whole of our revolution....
We have the Honor to transmit enclosed a Duplicate of our letter of the 3d. Instant, in which several Errors of some importance which found their way into the first hasty copy of our draft, are corrected. Some of these errors were mentioned in our letter of the Instant, of which also a copy is enclosed. The others, of which the most material occurs in the explanations on the subject of Export...
I have not yet heard from Mr Crowninshield, and I begin to fear that Mr Bagot’s power relative to the arming on the lakes is of a very limited nature. Finding many admonitions that my constitution does not accord with this climate, I must move to a higher surface. I shall therefore go to Loudoun, transacting by letter thence, all that can be managed in that way, as indeed most of the business...
I arrived here to day, with my family in the American ship the Augustus in 28: days from Portsmouth. It is my intention to set out for Richmond without delay, & leaving my family there, to proceed thence to Washington, for the purpose of giving you all the information in my power respecting our affairs with the British government. We are much exhausted by fatigue & sickness on the voyage, &...
I have been detain’d here longer than I had expected that I should be, but hope & presume that I shall, after attending the court to morrow get as far as Judge Nelson’s in the evening, & be with you tolerably early the next day. I wish you to examine the subject between the Senate & me, respecting military nominations, that we may confer on it when we meet. I send you the material papers, the...
My family were arrived before me. Thomas reached yr. house yesterday without my horse, and the old gentleman was so kind as lend his to assist in bringing Mrs. M. home. Our child has a fever, did not sleep last night nor on the road. I fear he will not rest to night. We shall have the Dr. with him tomorrow, & his gums lancd as we hope that is the only cause of his present indisposition. My...
Mr Vaughan, with whose character you are I presume well acquainted, left this city lately on a visit to Mr Jefferson, & yourself, by Norfolk & Richmond, having much desire to see him once more, & to become personally acquainted with you, before, he returns to Kennebeck in Maine, to remain stationary the residue of his days. He was the confidential friend of the M. of Landsdowne & Dr Franklin...
I had the pleasure to receive your letter of the 2d. yesterday. We shall set out to morrow & be with you the day after. I am much pushd by many important concerns to get to Washington as soon as possible, but will certainly remain a day with you. Mr Crowninshield has resignd, & that dept., suffers, most essentially in some interesting circumstances. I have thoughts of offering it to Mr Snider...
I returnd last night and receivd your letters of the 7th. & 8th. The letter of the Dey of Algiers, is sent to Mr Crowninshield at Salem, for an experiment, to obtain a translation of it, there, & at Boston, to be made under his auspices. It could not be translated at New York, or Phila., and I fear, that we shall have no better success, to the East. I have recd. no answer to the enquiry...
Finding by your letter recd yesterday that you would set out on that or this day, & probably be here to morrow, I resolved to await your arrival, & make a visit in the mean time to Loudoun, rather than take Loudoun in my route to Albemarle. I shall be back to morrow. 6. 24 pounders, 10. 18s. 10. 12s. 6. 6s. & 4. 8 Inch Howitzrs. are orderd to fort Pitt. They are necessary to batter & take...
I arrived here late yesterday eving. having taken Richmond in my route. I had the great satisfaction to find Mrs. Monroe & our youngest daughter in better health than I had anticipated, as I had to find Mr Hay & our eldest. The early hour at which the post rider has called renders it impossible for me to say any thing on publick affrs. by this opportunity. I shall immediately turn my attention...
The incapacity for business produc’d by so long an application to it at Washington, has been increasd since my return home by a fall from my horse, being taken off by a limb of a tree under which he passed. My head, & left shoulder were bruis’d, & my leg cut a little by the stirrup, but I have almost recover’d from these injuries. I have walk’d about to day, & expect to be able to ride...
It is highly important that the Congress be immediately called and the treaty & conventions we have formed be carried into immediate effect, in all their stipulations. If the measure we have adopted is approved, no delay shod. occur, in performing what we are to perform, since a failure in any one point in the time specified may defeat & I think will defeat the whole. We shall be more full on...
§ From James Monroe. 21 February 1815, War Department. “I have the honor respectfully to propose for your approbation the enclosed appointments in the Army of the United States.” RC and enclosure ( DNA : RG 46, Executive Proceedings, Nominations, 13B–A3); letterbook copy and letterbook copy of enclosure ( DNA : RG 107, LSP ). RC 1 p.; in a clerk’s hand, signed by Monroe. Letterbook copy dated...
The Secretary of State, to whom has been referred the resolution of the Senate of the 28th of last month, requesting the President to cause to be laid before the Senate such information as he may possess touching the execution of so much of the first article of the late treaty of peace and amity between His Britannic Majesty and the United States of America as relates to the restitution of...
Since my return I have devoted all the leasure time I have had in preparing my narrative for Mr. Bache but yet it is not finished. I suppose I have yet abt. a 3d. to do, which I hope to complete this week. The whole when completed will make a pamphlet of between thirty & forty pages. It has cost me much trouble on acct. of the necessity of observing great accuracy in facts, dates, &ca. Of the...
Being very anxious to join and proceed with you to the University, to perform our duties there, I have delayed answering your letter of May the 18th, in the hope that my health would be so far restored, as to enable me to do it. In this I have been disappointed. I am still too weak, to sustain such an exertion. I am, and have been free from fever, since my return from Richmond, and I take...
I had the pleasure to receive yours of the 20th. by yesday’s mail. The letter from the governor, communicating our reappointment as Visitors of the University, and requiring a meeting of the board on the first Monday in next month, I had receiv’d, as I had one, from Mr Cabell, apprizing me, that it was a mere measure of form, in complyance with the law, & there would be no necessity for the...
I have the pleasure to transmit you a copy of some communications which have lately taken place between this government and myself relative to the trial of Captain Whitby, which you will find is postponed till the first of March next to afford an opportunity for the witnesses to attend on the part of the United States. The time allowed is I fear rather short for the o bject, especially if the...
I have been favor’d with yours covering a letter to Mr. Thomson which I shall deliver him in the morning. I am glad you have accepted the appointmt.; if the court shod. sit, wh. is only a probable event, & the arrangment we have in contempletion with respect to the Mohawk shod. succeed I shall be happy to accompany you in a trip here next summer. We have heard nothing from Mr Jay since the...
You will have received thro’ the war dept., intelligence of the success against Proctor by the troops under Genl. Harrison, and of the change produc’d by it, and the preceding events on the lakes on the Indians. I send you a paper communicated to me in great confidence by the Gentleman whose name is written on the back. He has made other communications, of a still more interesting nature,...
Mr Sullivan, a son of the late Governor of that name, in Massachusetts, being desirous of visiting some parts of Virga., & particularly the University, having intimated a wish that I would make him known to you, I give him with pleasure this letter of introduction. He has been here some weeks, & is well acquainted, with the state of affairs; to him therefore I refer you for such information as...
I recd. the enclosed on my return home. Be so good as read it, & return it by the bearer. I am convinc’d that it would be impolitick to raise difficulties at this time. I expect to see Ct. Crillon in a few minutes, having written to him to call. RC and enclosure ( DLC : John Henry Papers). Undated; date assigned here on the basis of the enclosure (see n. 1). Monroe’s enclosure was very likely...
Your favor of the 17th. of June I have recd. & am sorry to find the most important measures of congress still remaining unsettled & in a very fluctuating state. The assumption will be dislik’d here from what I can learn, under any shape it can assume. Under the discussion it has recd. the publick mind appears to be made up on the subject, & will not readily yeild to any accommodation...
§ From James Monroe. 24 January 1815, War Department. “I have the honor respectfully to propose for your approbation, the following promotions in the Army of the United States.” RC and enclosure ( DNA : RG 46, Executive Proceedings, Nominations, 13B–A3). RC 1 p.; in a clerk’s hand, signed by Monroe. The enclosure (11 pp.; printed in Senate Exec. Proceedings, Journal of the Executive...
I had the honor to receive your letter of July 6th. by Doctor Bullus on the 31. ulto. & did not lose a moment in entering on the business committed to me by it, in the manner which seemed most likely to obtain success. The details shall be communicated to you in my next dispatch. All that I can state at present is, that the whole subject has been plac’d fully before this government in as...
I arrived here on the 2d. which was notified immediately to Mr. Cevallos by Mr. Pinckney, who acknowledged the notice in polite terms from Aranjuez to which place the court was moving at the time of my arrival. He invited us there for me to be presented to the King, which took place on the 13. The reception was very attentive & friendly: we had one interview with the minister afterwards, in...
I had the pleasure to receive yours from Phila. yesterday but so late that I cod. not answer it sooner. I hope you have before this recover’d from yr. fatigue, indeed I advise your prosecution of yr. journey here as soon as possible as the preferable place for that purpose. I shod. be happy you cod. give us as much of yr. time as possible here for reasons more self-interested. Of these we...
It is necessary that I should distinctly understand my own situation to give to it the greatest effect. In the absence of the secry of war, on your arrival here, and of genl winder, the duties of both devolv’d on me. It was your desire that I should act in both places, and the desire of the officers & citizens concurr’d. The duties of the military commander, were undertaken not on the...
You may consider the letter wh. accompanies this either as a publick or private one as is most proper. If it may be taken as a private one that will be most agreeable to me, for reasons you will readily conceive. I intended to have written you fully on my private concerns, but really I have not time, as I do not wish to delay my departure a moment for Madrid, whither I set out in an hour or...
I shod. have written you on friday but had nothing to communicate, nor indeed have I at present, unless the equal & unanimous vote of So. Carolina for Mr. Jefferson & Burr be so. It is understood that No. C. voted as we always heard she wod. that is 8. for J. & B. 4. for A. & P.; of Georgia, Tenessee & Kentuckey we know nothing, nor do we of the Eastern States. I think it probable the vote for...
We have the honor to inclose the account which Should be annexed to the Convention transmitted you. The Bordeaux embargo is in Assignats, and two thirds will be deducted from many of the others. We have reason to think from a particular account now in our hands there will be Such considerable deductions as will reduce the whole charge to less than 20 millions of livres including the interest....
I am much gratified to hear that mr Crawford has consented to take the dept. of war. I think he will render useful service, & gain credit by it. My family are very anxious that I should visit the sulphur springs, thinking that the use of the waters is necessary to the complete restoration of my health. In this they are supported, by the advice of the phisicians, particularly dr Everett, in...
I set out today, but being forc’d thro Caroline by some private concerns with the family of my late sister, shall not be able to reach Washington till the last of the week. I shall hurry on as fast as possible. The enclosed from Mr Crawford, it is proper that you should see. In its relation to two gentlemen, of real virtue (in my judgment) however they may stand with the public, or fit they...
I send you within two papers which will give you the most full & correct information of the views of the allies respecting So. America, that we possess; I mean more particularly that which bears date at Moscow. Its authenticity may be relied on, as we are assur’d, by Mr Erving, by a later letter, than that which accompanied it. You will keep both till we meet, but when that will be, I cannot...
Since my last nothing interesting has taken place in any view on this side of the atlantick. I have been told that my note was referrd to the admiralty, from whom a report had not been recd wh. was the cause of delay in the answer; that the delay in the admiralty was in part owing to some changes in it, Sr. Evan Nepean being removed to Ireland in character of chief secry. to the Ld....
I have had the pleasure to recieve your letter with one from Mr Lee, and regret that you should say one word, as to the necessity you are under to send it, or such papers on to me. I need not assure you that I am always happy to hear from you, and am glad of any occurrence which draws from you a letter. My situation, as you well know, renders it impossible for me to write you often or...
I have been since my return here, so incessantly engaged in the most interesting business, that I have not had a moment to say any thing to you. I am now engaged in preparing the message for Congress, whose meeting is so near at hand, that I shall I fear be badly prepard. The question respecting canals & roads is full of difficulty, growing out of what has passd on it. After all the...
I receivd your kind letter, with the information, respecting my acct., with the estate of our late friend Mr. Jones, the day after my meeting with the Commissrs.; but they admitted the item on a view of the passage in Mr Yards letter relating to it, & my assurance, that I would withdraw it, if it should not be supported by you. Your letter will be very satisfactory to them, without even a copy...
The Secretary of State to whom was referred the Resolution of the House of Representatives of the 13th. Instant, requesting information touching our relations with France, has the honor to submit to the President an extract of the Letter from the Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States at Paris, which contains the latest, and the only material, information received by this Department on...
I have just receiv’d yours of the 23.d., and by the same mail, a second, from Judge Brooke, the purport of which I hasten to communicate to you. He is aware, as I infer, from the communications which were made to the members of the convention, by Col: Mercer, & likewise, on your part, by Mr Cabell, that we will not act, as Electors, nor remain on the ticket, and has assur’d me, in the letter...
Mr Shaler intimates that the commanders of the squadrons about to sail for the medeteranean, expect some additional allowance to their pay in the navy, on account of their new office as commissioners to treat for peace, and that it may be made by a sum in gross for the expences of their table. I have conferrd with Com: Rodgers on the subject, who thinks that the claim is reasonable, and is...
I have receivd your letter of the 18th. communicating a project of Mr Johnson, for carrying into effect the act of the last Session of assembly, authorising the Visitors, to borrow a certain sum of money, for the use of the University, with a proposition from Mr Randolph to make the loan desird, as the Trustee, & in behalf of Mrs Randolph. It appears to me, that Mr Randolph accedes...
I send you several interesting letters from Bal: particularly one from Genl winder to which I will prepare an answer & submit it to you early this morning. The report from Commodores Rodgers, Porter and Perry ought not to be publishd, till I get one from Genl. Hungerford & also from Stuart. It is I rather think an anomaly, for naval commanders, on land, to report at all, to the Secry of the...
I have recd. several letters of late from some of our friends, who complain of the arrangment or rather provision made in the treaties with France for American creditors, to whom they intimate an attention was paid wh. may embarrass our treasury. It is presumeable that we might have plac’d them on any reasonably satisfactory ground that we wod. have proposed; but as the payment of no part of...
You will receive with this a duplicate of a private letter sent some few days past by Liverpool. It is private from the reference it has to Mr. Livingston, of whom it may [be] better that any remarks however impartial which I make, shod. be thus convey’d. I hope you will receive that, as this being a bad copy from the press may not be easily read. I lately requested that you wod. be so good as...
It is this moment reported and is I think unquestionably true that Mr. Pitt is dead. He is said to have expired this morning. The complete disorder of his bowells, and of his digestive faculties, were the simptoms which attended his last moments. It is more than presumeable that the failure of his measures on the continent may have been the real cause of them & of his death. The parliment...
My publick letter and the papers will give you every thing wh. is not communicated in my letter to the President. What has become of the convention formed by Mr. King just before he sailed from this country? You have not mentioned it in any communication of late. Mr. Baring tells me it was rejected, wh. is the only intelligence I have on the subject. In commencing a negotiation it is probable...
I have yours by yesterday’s mail. You will have heard of the success agnst Proctor. I hope we shall soon get something from the st Lawrence that will correspond with it. I enclose you a project relative to the southern business, which has become much involved by Genl. Williams’s visit thither. I do not understand, his statment, of the motive, in connection with that given you by Genl....
I took the liberty lately to forward to yr. care by Major Coleman who went to Alexa. a box containing the three pieces of tapestry, which are intended for Mr. Fenwick, he having promised to take charge of and sell them for me. Can you possibly convey them to his possession. He is I believe some where ⟨in th⟩e neighbourhood of the federal city. Will you also be so good as put the enclosed...