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I hasten to transmit to you a copy of a letter which I received yesterday from Lord Mulgrave in reply to mine of augt. 12. and Sepr. 23d. From the length of time which had elapsed, and other circumstances, I had almost concluded that his government had resolved not to enter on the subject, but to leave me to get its determination as I could⟨,⟩; from the decisions of the admiralty. I find...
I enclose you a copy of the letter to Genl. Jackson, of the 21st of octr. 1814. requested in your last of the 16th ulto. The papers mentiond in that letter were recd— I send you one from Mr Ingersoll, relating to your late communication, of your views, respecting the power of the Genl. govt. to encourage domestic manufactures, in reply to which, I assurd him, that I fully concurrd in the...
My affairs in Loudoun requiring in an urgent manner my presence, I shall go up to day & return on monday or tuesday next. A passport from the British Commander to take dispatches to Ghent being as I presume necessary, I have arrang’d in the dept. a letter to him for the purpose. I know of nothing that will suffer in my short absence. Respectfully your friend RC ( DLC : Rives Collection,...
Col: Sullivan having intimated to me his intention to visit our University, and other parts of Virga., with his Lady, and to call on you and Mrs. Madison, I have taken the liberty to give them this introduction to your acquaintance. He is the son of the late govr. Sullivan of Massachusetts, & was the Secretary of Mr. Bowdoin in his mission to Spain, in 1805., in which character, I then became...
I had an interview with Mr Bagot yesterday on the subject of the fisheries. He proposes, to allot for our use, a certain tract on the Labrador shore, lying between Mt. Joli & the strait of Belle Isle, the Esquimaux bay, a distance of more than 150 miles, being between 2. and 3. degrees. Ships which descend the St. Lawrence pass, generally, I believe, thro this strait by Mt. Joli. His idea is,...
I was yesterday at Monticello when Mr. Jefferson informed me he proposed sitting out on the next (this) morning on a visit to you, to remain a day & return. Considering yr. present publick engagment, the business before the legislature & the part you will necessarily take in it, with his publick station, I was immediately impressed with an idea the trip had better be declined & so observed. He...
We came here on sunday & shall proceed to Richmond the day after to morrow. We left washington on saturday. We concurr’d in the opinion suggested in your letter that it would be proper to execute the law for reducing the army, and to permit the squadron to sail for the mediteranean, with instructions to keep a look out as to events, & the mov’ment of the fleets of other powers. These measures...
I arriv’d here the evening of the day I left you & found Mrs. Monroe & the family well. They desire to be remember’d to you. I think you mention’d you had not recd. the letter I had address’d you in answer to yours before you left Phila., the last from that place. You express’d an uneasiness at failing to command such a sum, as might enable you to furnish me with the sum I advanc’d for you in...
I found on my return from Albemarle the day before yesterday yours of the 6th. wh. had arrived in my absence. Mrs. M. who recd. it forwarded immediately to Callendar that which was enclosed to him, very properly concluding it was more important he shod. receive it without delay, than that I shod. previously peruse it. As I do not know precisely the contents of yr. letter to him, I can make no...
I saw Mr. Bishop this morning, on the subject of his late letter to me, communicated to Mr. Crawford. I told him that no opinion had been formed against him, & that the representation to his prejudice, which had been made to the dept. of the Treasury, & sent to him by Mr. Crawford, had been sent to him, in a spirit of candour, to enable him to give such explanation, as he might think proper:...
This will be delivered to you by Col: Tatham who I have known for more than 20. years, at first a clerk of the council at Richmond. I have seen him here from my arrival to this period, frequently, and at his request, as he is about setting out for America, give him this to you. I consider him as a firm friend to the UStates of wh. he is a citizen, being there thro the whole of our revolution....
We have the Honor to transmit enclosed a Duplicate of our letter of the 3d. Instant, in which several Errors of some importance which found their way into the first hasty copy of our draft, are corrected. Some of these errors were mentioned in our letter of the Instant, of which also a copy is enclosed. The others, of which the most material occurs in the explanations on the subject of Export...
I have not yet heard from Mr Crowninshield, and I begin to fear that Mr Bagot’s power relative to the arming on the lakes is of a very limited nature. Finding many admonitions that my constitution does not accord with this climate, I must move to a higher surface. I shall therefore go to Loudoun, transacting by letter thence, all that can be managed in that way, as indeed most of the business...
I arrived here to day, with my family in the American ship the Augustus in 28: days from Portsmouth. It is my intention to set out for Richmond without delay, & leaving my family there, to proceed thence to Washington, for the purpose of giving you all the information in my power respecting our affairs with the British government. We are much exhausted by fatigue & sickness on the voyage, &...
I have been detain’d here longer than I had expected that I should be, but hope & presume that I shall, after attending the court to morrow get as far as Judge Nelson’s in the evening, & be with you tolerably early the next day. I wish you to examine the subject between the Senate & me, respecting military nominations, that we may confer on it when we meet. I send you the material papers, the...
My family were arrived before me. Thomas reached yr. house yesterday without my horse, and the old gentleman was so kind as lend his to assist in bringing Mrs. M. home. Our child has a fever, did not sleep last night nor on the road. I fear he will not rest to night. We shall have the Dr. with him tomorrow, & his gums lancd as we hope that is the only cause of his present indisposition. My...
Mr Vaughan, with whose character you are I presume well acquainted, left this city lately on a visit to Mr Jefferson, & yourself, by Norfolk & Richmond, having much desire to see him once more, & to become personally acquainted with you, before, he returns to Kennebeck in Maine, to remain stationary the residue of his days. He was the confidential friend of the M. of Landsdowne & Dr Franklin...
I had the pleasure to receive your letter of the 2d. yesterday. We shall set out to morrow & be with you the day after. I am much pushd by many important concerns to get to Washington as soon as possible, but will certainly remain a day with you. Mr Crowninshield has resignd, & that dept., suffers, most essentially in some interesting circumstances. I have thoughts of offering it to Mr Snider...
I returnd last night and receivd your letters of the 7th. & 8th. The letter of the Dey of Algiers, is sent to Mr Crowninshield at Salem, for an experiment, to obtain a translation of it, there, & at Boston, to be made under his auspices. It could not be translated at New York, or Phila., and I fear, that we shall have no better success, to the East. I have recd. no answer to the enquiry...
Finding by your letter recd yesterday that you would set out on that or this day, & probably be here to morrow, I resolved to await your arrival, & make a visit in the mean time to Loudoun, rather than take Loudoun in my route to Albemarle. I shall be back to morrow. 6. 24 pounders, 10. 18s. 10. 12s. 6. 6s. & 4. 8 Inch Howitzrs. are orderd to fort Pitt. They are necessary to batter & take...
I arrived here late yesterday eving. having taken Richmond in my route. I had the great satisfaction to find Mrs. Monroe & our youngest daughter in better health than I had anticipated, as I had to find Mr Hay & our eldest. The early hour at which the post rider has called renders it impossible for me to say any thing on publick affrs. by this opportunity. I shall immediately turn my attention...
The incapacity for business produc’d by so long an application to it at Washington, has been increasd since my return home by a fall from my horse, being taken off by a limb of a tree under which he passed. My head, & left shoulder were bruis’d, & my leg cut a little by the stirrup, but I have almost recover’d from these injuries. I have walk’d about to day, & expect to be able to ride...
It is highly important that the Congress be immediately called and the treaty & conventions we have formed be carried into immediate effect, in all their stipulations. If the measure we have adopted is approved, no delay shod. occur, in performing what we are to perform, since a failure in any one point in the time specified may defeat & I think will defeat the whole. We shall be more full on...
§ From James Monroe. 21 February 1815, War Department. “I have the honor respectfully to propose for your approbation the enclosed appointments in the Army of the United States.” RC and enclosure ( DNA : RG 46, Executive Proceedings, Nominations, 13B–A3); letterbook copy and letterbook copy of enclosure ( DNA : RG 107, LSP ). RC 1 p.; in a clerk’s hand, signed by Monroe. Letterbook copy dated...
The Secretary of State, to whom has been referred the resolution of the Senate of the 28th of last month, requesting the President to cause to be laid before the Senate such information as he may possess touching the execution of so much of the first article of the late treaty of peace and amity between His Britannic Majesty and the United States of America as relates to the restitution of...
Since my return I have devoted all the leasure time I have had in preparing my narrative for Mr. Bache but yet it is not finished. I suppose I have yet abt. a 3d. to do, which I hope to complete this week. The whole when completed will make a pamphlet of between thirty & forty pages. It has cost me much trouble on acct. of the necessity of observing great accuracy in facts, dates, &ca. Of the...
Being very anxious to join and proceed with you to the University, to perform our duties there, I have delayed answering your letter of May the 18th, in the hope that my health would be so far restored, as to enable me to do it. In this I have been disappointed. I am still too weak, to sustain such an exertion. I am, and have been free from fever, since my return from Richmond, and I take...
I had the pleasure to receive yours of the 20th. by yesday’s mail. The letter from the governor, communicating our reappointment as Visitors of the University, and requiring a meeting of the board on the first Monday in next month, I had receiv’d, as I had one, from Mr Cabell, apprizing me, that it was a mere measure of form, in complyance with the law, & there would be no necessity for the...
I have the pleasure to transmit you a copy of some communications which have lately taken place between this government and myself relative to the trial of Captain Whitby, which you will find is postponed till the first of March next to afford an opportunity for the witnesses to attend on the part of the United States. The time allowed is I fear rather short for the o bject, especially if the...
I have been favor’d with yours covering a letter to Mr. Thomson which I shall deliver him in the morning. I am glad you have accepted the appointmt.; if the court shod. sit, wh. is only a probable event, & the arrangment we have in contempletion with respect to the Mohawk shod. succeed I shall be happy to accompany you in a trip here next summer. We have heard nothing from Mr Jay since the...