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The enclosed from Mr Rush, will give you a view of our present relations with England. Retain them till we meet, which I expect will be next week. The meeting of the visitors, is to be, I understand, then, in which, we shall expect to see you, if not we shall have the pleasure of se[e]ing you at your own house as we go to Washington, which we propose doing next week. We hope that you are all...
I have recd. yours of March 30th. with a list of the documents lately submitted to Congress, and the papers sent you from this place. I return to you those latter papers, on a presumption that you have not copies, of them, or rather the originals; if you have they can be of no use to you, & in that case I will thank you to send them back, or that you will send me copies at your leisure. My...
I have been with Mr. R. & have given him no final answer. The fact appears to be that the message to me was directly from the President, so that a decision settles it. He has also had an interview with Mr. Dayton. May I request of you to go to Mr. Randolph, & settle the matter with him. I promised him you wod. in the course of ½ an hour. If it has not the approbation of my few friends &...
The Secretary of State, to whom was referred the Resolution of the House of Representatives of the 13th inst, requesting the President to lay before the House such documents relative to the Russian mediation, as in his opinion it may not be improper to communicate, has the honor to transmit to the President, for the information of the House, the following letters in relation to that subject...
I send you herewith the principal documents which have been printed since the commencment of the Session. Should any be omitted, or should there be any information on any point not touched by them, which you may desire, or [ sic ] being so advised, I will communicate it. The Missouri question, as it is call’d, still engages the attention of Congress, & will probably do it, much longer. The...
General King of the district of Maine in Massachusetts, being desirous, of making you a visit, I take much pleasure in promoting his wishes by giving him this introduction to you. His steady & firm attachment to the principles of our govt., & support of it, in the late war, by very meritorious services, are known to you. I hope that you derive no inconvenience from this severe attack of cold...
Captn. Dulton having occasion for money in the UStates with a view to his accomodation I have given him a draft on you for the amt. here, for my expences <per? > for the sum of sixteen hundred sixty dolls. 14. cents. I send you a letter from the Chevalr. Frere containing some offcl. papers relative to his recall. He is a worthy man a friend of the UStates. He feels some sensibility to the...
The Undersigned acting as Secretary of State to whom was referred the Resolution of the Senate, requesting the President to cause to be laid before the Senate such information in his possession, respecting the existing state of the Relations between the United States and the Continental powers of Europe as he may deem not improper to be communicated, has the honor to report: That the Relations...
Finding that my arrangments in Loudoun might be completed on the day I arriv’d there, I came down on the following day, monday. Altho the upper road is bad, I still think it will be found better than either of the others. Some letters are recd. from Mr Crawford, the most important of wh. are in cypher. They shall be forwarded without delay we have nothing from our comrs. Chauncey’s fate is...
The unfavorable state of the weather since my arrival here, has kept me so much confind, that I have been unable, to pay, that attention to my affairs, that I should otherwise have done. I shall however be with you in the course of the insuing week. I send you a letter from Judge Nelson, & two from Mr. Appleton, which give the latest accounts, from them, of affairs in Spain. I send you also,...
§ From James Monroe. 8 November 1814, War Department. “I have the honor respectfully to submit for your approbation the following list of appointments in the Army of the United States. “I have also to request that the enclosed list of promotions may be substituted for the list of promotions in the Light Artillery and Riflemen now before the Senate, and that the name of Garret E. Pendergrast...
I have not yet receiv’d an answer from Mr Crowninshield, respecting the Labrador coast, or the Algerine letter. The letter to Mr Harris, will be ready for Mr Coles whenever he arrives. It being pretty much a legal subject, I have availd myself of the aid of Mr Rush in preparing the dispatch. Mr Homans says that a corvette is prepard to take him, & that the cost will be inconsiderable, she...
Some very interesting domestick concerns which could not well be postponed, seconded by the state of the wound on my leg, prevented my having the pleasure of waiting on you in the last week, but I shall be with you to morrow if no accident presents an obstacle to it. I shall bring all the papers with me which it will be necessary to submit to your view at this time. Indeed many things have...
Mr Lawrance & Mr Jones of New York, young gentlemen of merit, well connected there, expressing a wish to visit you & Mr Jefferson, I have felt it due to the introduction they have presented me, to make them known to you. They intend to visit Europe in the Spring, & will I am satisfied, take much interest in bearing any letters from you, or being in any respect useful to you. With great respect...
I have nothing from you to day. Col Cass has arrivd & gives the same acct. heretofore recd. from others of the surrender of Detroit. Genl Cushing thinks that a power to grant a volunteer comn., to give effect to the law, is a necessary construction of it. I shall, unless some other view be taken in the course of the day, accept such a comn. & set out in discharge of it, in a few days. A short...
I wrote you two days since by my servant who was to put the letter in the post office at charlottesville. This will be presented by Mr. Ervin a young man of merit from Boston. I saw him in Paris, but on some ground wh. I forget refused him my passport, in consequence whereof we did not become acquaint⟨ed. He pub⟩lished my book in Engld., of which he sent me a copy. Last winter he was...
I have addressed to your care a letter for Mr. R. & two others, to be addressed by you according to circumstances either to Langdon, Burr, Butler, Ross or any other person in case you shod. deem it proper to be presented at all & sent them in a packet by Havre. This which covers one for Mr. R. is to go by Bordeaux. I submit it entirely to you either to present or suppress it as the state of...
I hasten to inform you that this govt. has decided to send a minister to the UStates, to arrange with our govt. the reparation wh. is due for the attack on the Chesapeake. The policy of this measure in all its aspects I shall communicate to you without any avoidable delay. It may have more objects than the ostensible one, & therefore it shod. be recd. with caution. My communications with Mr...
Since the receipt of your last letter, application has been made to me, from citizens at Leesburg to know if I would act in the convention if elected, stating certain data, to which they were attached, with an intimation that they concluded that I was so likewise. I answered that altho’ there were many considerations, to induce me to remain at home, that I nevertheless, would act, if elected,...
I enclose you a copy of a letter sent yesterday to genl. winder, relating to the communication between Col. P. & Col: Baynes, which were forwarded to you a day or two before. A stronger paper was authorised by the heads of depts., but I afterwards moderated the terms, retaining the sense. The distinction in it, is so obvious, between the passage which expresses, the sense of the govt. on...
I send you letters from General Jackson which give an account of a victory truly glorious. It will be well to send them to Gales, except that which I have marked to be retained—unless indeed so much of the letter of the 9th. as relates to the conduct of the Kentuckey militia should also be retaind, tho I do not see how it can be, as similar statments will soon force themselves on the public RC...
I expected to have been presented to the King at the last levee according to the intimation of Lord Hawkesbury at our interview on my arrival; but the day before the levee Mr. Hammond called to express the regret of Lord Hawkesbury that the death of Lord Bristol the father of Lady Hawkesbury, which was known only the night before, put it out of his Lordships power to accompany me to the court...
I have yours of the 23 d. Col: Aspinwall is desirous of obtaining the appointment to London as you were apprizd before you left us. The principal competitors are Col: Drayton & Com: Barney. The loss of his arm gives him I think a stronger claim than either of the others, and will perhaps reconcile both of them to his appointment. His appointment would open a place in the army for some other...
I have been much engaged in my private concerns, tho’ rather indisposed, since my return home, so that I have not been able to enter on any serious business. I shall begin to day to take up the most pressing. I retain for the present Sodestroms comns., believing that their effect will be to license a trade with the enemy. I return the letters of the Secry at war and of the navy. Respectfully &...
I have seen Ld. Hawkesbury & expect to be presented to the King soon. I shall mention in my next publick letter what passed, which was not material, otherwise than as it alluded to the state in wh. I found the negotiation when I arrived at Paris, & the late treaty formed with G. B. for admitting her into the mississippi by Mr. King as I understand is the case of which I had heard nothing & of...
You will receive herewith a copy of the treaty and conventions which we have concluded with the French republick for the cession of Louisiana, the original of which was sent by Mr Hughes, and a copy lately by the way of England. This will be forwarded by Mr. Derieux respecting whom I wrote you in my last communication. Mr. Derieux is the person who was engaged to take our first dispatch to the...
I am anxious to know the state of your health, & whether it is such, as will enable you to attend the convention. I most earnestly hope that you will be able to attend it, for if I go, I shall be much gratified to meet you there, and whether I do or not, I am satisfied that your presence, altho you might take no part, in the discussion, would have a very useful effect. My health since, we...
I return’d here yesterday morning, having been prevented arriving the preceding evening by the rain. The case with Algiers is interesting. The sentiments expressed in your letter of the 25th. which I have just received, accord in every circumstance, with those of the gentlemen in the admin. here. Anxious to communicate theirs, to you, we had an informal meeting on the subject yesterday, in...
Being on a visit to this place I avail myself of the post wh. goes to morrow yr. way to congratulate you on the issue of the presidential election. The want of arrangment in the commenc’ment, subjected the result to much incertainty & embarrassment, but happily it is at an end, and it is probable the circumstances attending the crisis may prove useful. I left Richmond on tuesday & sit out in...
I forward the inclosed to Havre in the hope it may find Mr. Jay there & be conveyed with our other dispatches by him. I shall now decide in a few days on the question relative to my trip to Spn. & inform you of it by the first opportunity. I shall certainly not go unless I find I may with safety as to things here & with some hope of advantage there. The French are in complete possession of...