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I enclose you a copy of a letter sent yesterday to genl. winder, relating to the communication between Col. P. & Col: Baynes, which were forwarded to you a day or two before. A stronger paper was authorised by the heads of depts., but I afterwards moderated the terms, retaining the sense. The distinction in it, is so obvious, between the passage which expresses, the sense of the govt. on...
I send you letters from General Jackson which give an account of a victory truly glorious. It will be well to send them to Gales, except that which I have marked to be retained—unless indeed so much of the letter of the 9th. as relates to the conduct of the Kentuckey militia should also be retaind, tho I do not see how it can be, as similar statments will soon force themselves on the public RC...
I expected to have been presented to the King at the last levee according to the intimation of Lord Hawkesbury at our interview on my arrival; but the day before the levee Mr. Hammond called to express the regret of Lord Hawkesbury that the death of Lord Bristol the father of Lady Hawkesbury, which was known only the night before, put it out of his Lordships power to accompany me to the court...
I have been much engaged in my private concerns, tho’ rather indisposed, since my return home, so that I have not been able to enter on any serious business. I shall begin to day to take up the most pressing. I retain for the present Sodestroms comns., believing that their effect will be to license a trade with the enemy. I return the letters of the Secry at war and of the navy. Respectfully &...
I have seen Ld. Hawkesbury & expect to be presented to the King soon. I shall mention in my next publick letter what passed, which was not material, otherwise than as it alluded to the state in wh. I found the negotiation when I arrived at Paris, & the late treaty formed with G. B. for admitting her into the mississippi by Mr. King as I understand is the case of which I had heard nothing & of...
You will receive herewith a copy of the treaty and conventions which we have concluded with the French republick for the cession of Louisiana, the original of which was sent by Mr Hughes, and a copy lately by the way of England. This will be forwarded by Mr. Derieux respecting whom I wrote you in my last communication. Mr. Derieux is the person who was engaged to take our first dispatch to the...
I received yours of the 5th. & 8th. this morning. I will endeavour to forward you by tomorrow’s mail a copy of the letter to genl. Pinckney, which corresponds strictly with that to Mr Baker respecting the treaty, & with what has passed between us relative to the sale of slaves in the W Indies. How much shall be given for the ransom of our people to the Dey of Algiers? I will forward for your...
I return the papers relating to Fort Washington with my entire concurrence in the result proposed in the report of Mr Dallas; that Major L’Enfant be no longer employd & that the superintendance be committed to an officer of the Corps of Engineers. I submit it however for consideration, whether a milder term than, "discharg’d" may not be used. He came into the service at a distressing period...
I am anxious to know the state of your health, & whether it is such, as will enable you to attend the convention. I most earnestly hope that you will be able to attend it, for if I go, I shall be much gratified to meet you there, and whether I do or not, I am satisfied that your presence, altho you might take no part, in the discussion, would have a very useful effect. My health since, we...
I return’d here yesterday morning, having been prevented arriving the preceding evening by the rain. The case with Algiers is interesting. The sentiments expressed in your letter of the 25th. which I have just received, accord in every circumstance, with those of the gentlemen in the admin. here. Anxious to communicate theirs, to you, we had an informal meeting on the subject yesterday, in...