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I intended to have called on you to day, and had actually set out, but have been compelld to return, by the rain, & still more serious menacing. I shall avail myself of some early occasion. I send the bearer, to enquire, after the state of your health, & that of your family—with my best wishes & great respect MHi .
Having lately rec d an intimation that an herb which I now send you, would be useful to you. I hasten to do it by the present mail. The parties are highly respectable, I mean Mr Hooe on whom it has operated, & Mr Buckner who writes the letter which I send you. I will write you again by the next mail. I have no doubt of the extr y efficacy of the remedy—in haste yours MHi .
I sent you by the last mail an herb, which, as had been represented to me by Mr Buckner, had been useful to M r B. Hooe, in the complaint of the strangary, with Mr Buckners letter on the subject, which I hope you have receivd. Doctor Wallace, happening to be here, when the packet & explanatory letter were despatched, I shewd them to him, & found that he was well acquainted with the herb & its...
I regret that it will not be in my power to dine with you to day—Judge Nelson is with me & I cannot leave him. I will be with you as soon as in my power, and certainly as much as the urgent state of my affairs will permit. I hope that you were not injurd, by your ride, on yesterday. MHi .
I have executed an important, but painful duty with mr Goodwyn, & am on the point of setting out for Loudon. I should have called to bid you farewell, but the weather is so unfavorable, & I am press’d so earnestly by letters from Loudon to hurry back there, that I have not a moment to spare, especially as you will make a just allowance for the omission. For your health and welfare, you have my...
The communication which you made to me when last at your house, of the correspondence between you & M r Giles, in reference to a communication made to you by Mr Adams, pending the embargo, of certain combinations which menacd the union, & producd its repeal, has engaged my attention since, as far as the urgent business in which I have been engaged would permit. I have reflected more on it,...
It was my intention, as it was my desire, to have communicated to the committee no part of your letter of the 13 th of Jany 1803, announcing my appointment, to France & Spain, and on that principle I acted, at the last Session. From this however, I have been induced to depart reluctantly, by intimations which have been recently given me, by some friends in Washington, that no evidence being...
I mentiond in a letter which I lately wrote to you, that I had seen in a paper from Richmond, a notice of an application which you had made to the legislature, for permission to sell a large portion of your estate, by lottery, for the payment of your debts, and that I should write you again on the subject. Since then I have been much indisposed, with the influenza, from which, I have not yet...
The enclosed letter from M r Go relating to a subject interesting to you, and your family, I forward it to you with pleasure. we have heard with deep regret, of the afflicting calamity with which you have been visited, but well know that you will not want resources, to meet any disaster, to which, our nature is subject. with our best wishes to M rs Randolph & family, I am Dear Sir very...
The committee to whom the business was committed, have recently made a report on my claims, a copy of which, I have requested a friend at washington, to procure & forward to you. I regret to find, that it has not met my expectation, either in regard to some of the items, or the period at which, interest, shall commence. If for example, money was withheld, which ought to been allowed me, on the...
It was my intention to have called on you this evening, and to have presented in person M r Goodwyn, who will have the pleasure to deliver to you this letter, but have been prevented by the rain. He is a son, of M r P. Goodwyn, a member of Congress, I believe, during your service, in the gov t , as well as mine. Having purchased a part of my land here, he will become your neighbour, and I am...
My letters to Mr. Madison are so full on what concerns us, as to leave me little to add to you. I never experienc’d more difficulty in any case, than in deciding whether to hasten the negotiation with this govt. to a conclusion, & set out immediately in pursuit of the other object, or to let it take its natural course and consume a couple of months more, and pursue that object afterwards. The...
I am so far on my way to Madrid and on the point of recommencing my journey this morning. my letters to Mr. Madison have been so full that it is unnecessary to enter into the same topicks here even had I time, tho’ I have not as I set out in an hour. It is possible that yr. attention may be directed to the fortification of our ports, since the establishment of certain fortifications on the...
Altho’ it is not yet decided whether I shall sail this fall or not to the UStates, as I most earnestly wish to do, yet I cannot neglect the opportunity by Col: Mercer, to add something to you which it is possible may not be in any other letters. It was my intention as I intimated by Captn. Dulton, to sail immediately after my arrival here, & nothing wod. have prevented it but the seizure of...
I wrote you lately by Col: Mercer, by whom I intended to have forwarded Carey’s letter respecting the documents which you had committed to him relative to the war in our southern states. By accident it was left behind, but is now forwarded. I hope the same which he states to be necessary to redeem the papers will be made up & furnished him. In that case the person to whom it is entrusted here...
Yours of june 15th. was recd. on my arrival here. Mr. Gamble has not been here that I can learn. Shod. he come while I am here I shall most certainly pay him the attention you desire. I have conferr’d with Mr. Carey respecting the documents concerning the war in our southern states which you committed to him for publication, & send his apology in a letter to me for not having answered yr....
If I was not personally your friend and did not wish success to your administration, from the interest I take in your welfare, as in that of my country, I should not write you with the freedom I propose to do in this letter. It is my intention to enter fully into some topicks which are of very high importance to your reputation as to the best interests of the UStates, & I do it in confidence...
The opportunity by Mr. Bankhead is too favorable not to be taken advantage of to write you, altho I may be able to add but little to what you find in my official dispatches. The business here has been suspended since the late appointment was known & will remain so till Mr. Pinkney arrives. It was impossible for me to move in it after that event, either with propriety or effect. besides it...
It is painful to touch on other topicks but I shod. feel myself deficient in candor if I did not observe that at no period of my life was I ever subjected to more inquietude than I have suffered since my return from Spain. I have found myself plac’d in a situation thro’ the whole of this interval altogether unexpected & in consideration of the parties to it equally novel. It was my wish to...
The admn. likely to change its tone & I to be swept from the stage. On the 25. of April I was resolved to press the business with more earnestness than I had done; to remind Mr. Fox of his engagmts & thro’ him produce some effect in the Cabinet. In that state he found it necessary to secure quiet somewhere & asked me if Mr. M. or Mr K. were coming over. I verily believed that no one was coming...
Your favor of May 4th. was presented to me on the 24th. ulto. by Mr Pinkney. That of March 16th. has not yet reached me. You are so good as to offer me either of the governments of Louisiana & to intimate that they shall be kept open sometime for my answer. I should be very sorry if any injurious delay proceeded from that cause; I hasten therefore to prevent it. At one time I was inclined to...
I have had the pleasure to receive yours of Octr. 26. and shall not fail to bring with me the articles mentioned in it from Jones the Instrument maker in Holborn. I am much indebted to you that the sum they will cost on an old account so that that matter will rest of course for the present.   I am very thankful to you for the information given me respecting the state of my affrs. in Albemarle....
My great anxiety to forward to you the account and receit for the sum which I paid for your mathematical instruments at London, when I should acknowledge your kind letter of the 18th, prevented my answering it sooner. To obtain them I was forced to ransack all my papers, which required much time, & in truth I did not succeed in finding them till this morning. I have now the pleasure to inclose...
I had the pleasure to receive your favor of the 11th. instant the day after I returned from Albemarle. It is very distressing to me to discuss with you the topicks on which it treats, but in the state in which things are it is certainly best to come to a perfect understanding on every point & to repair on both sides any injury which may have been received. To do you an injury or indeed any one...
I had the pleasure to receive some days past your favor of the 11th. & that of the 13. to day. Being perfectly satisfied by the explanations & assurances which you had given me in your preceding letters that I had taken an improper idea of yr. disposition towards me, the details contained in your last one were not necessary in that view. I receive them however with great interest, because in...
On information of the death of John Page which gained general belief here, I wrote you a letter two days since, which had relation to an object connected with that event. The present accounts contradict that report & as I hope & believe on good ground. I hasten therefore to correct the error into which I had been led.   You are I presume by this time return’d to Washington. I hope that you...
I arrived here on Saturday evening from Kentuckey & shall proceed to Richmond as soon as I recover from the fatigue of the late journey. The object of this is to request your sanction to the publication of our late correspondence on certain important publick topicks. It is interesting & will I doubt not be satisfactory to the publick and to many friends to be made acquainted with that...
I have just returned from Richmond & send the inclosed for yr. inspection in the hope that you may not have set-out to day for Washington, knowing that you have heretofore frequently staid a day longer than that which you had appointed for your departure to arrange more completely your private affairs. I take the liberty to submit to your perusal a copy of my letters to Mr. Randolph, being the...
Immediately after you left Albemarle, I was forc’d to go to Loudoun to make some arrangements in the estate with which I am charged there, & having returned by the same route, I did not reach this place till yesterday late at night. I had not therefore the pleasure to receive your kind favors of the 12th. & 13. till to day. The papers noted in your letters to me shall most certainly be omitted...
Our correspondence will be printed today in a pamphlet, a copy of which shall be sent to you by the mail if it is completed in time. I have omitted in the publication every passage which had been noted by you, and added to the list of omissions, one passage, in your letter of April 11th. which speaks of the use made of my name for vindictive purposes, the publication of which could only serve...
I omitted in my last letter to state to you that in the publication of our late correspondence, some few verbal alterations had been made in my letter of March 22d. & a short passage omitted. In speaking of special missions it stands in the publication that they were never well received &c. I think I substituted to those terms the word “agreable” in the letter; and towards the conclusion the...
An idea has occurr’d to me which I will take the liberty to submit to your consideration. I have thought that you might command my services before you retire from office, in a mode which might prove advantageous to our country & equally honorable to you & myself. Our affairs are evidently at a pause, and the next step to be taken without an unexpected change, unless some expedient consistent...
I returned from Albemarle on saturday & had the pleasure to receive your favor of the 28. ulto. on Monday last. I perceive that the idea which I suggested of a new and decisive effort, to avert the dangers interior & exterior of the present crisis, by a special mission to France & England, has not obtained your approbation. As the idea was suggested without illustration you will permit me to...