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I was favor’d with yours of the 14. two or three days past. The apology is rather due from those gentn. to whom it alludes, both to you and me, for their omission, than that they have any cause of complaint. The truth is, I suspect they were more at ease with their commercl. acquaintance, than they would have been elswhere, and are happier in their escape from the attention of others, than it...
My professional duties have taken me from the political scene here, so that I have it not in my power yet to give you any thing in that line of moment. On monday I shall take my seat in the house & soon become in some measure acquainted, I suppose, with the views of parties. Carrington, with whom I was in compy. a few minutes yesterday, complains of a decision of the house by which he was...
Your favor of the 5th. was not presented me untill the day before yesterday, or it should have been answer’d sooner. I think with you the act of Congress respecting the missisippi an acquisition on that side, and therefore an happy circumstance. It must make an impression on the new government, and if the disposition of Spain shod. be what I had reason to believe it was, before the commencment...
I was favord with yours upon my return a few days since from the districts of Staunton & Charlotte ville—which will apologize for your not hearing from me sooner. The Judges, Mrs. Monroe and our child were of the party, so that you will readily suppose there was some variety in the entertainment. The arrangment of the business of the genl. court, into the districts, having not been...
Upon my return home the other day after the close of the Chancery term, I found a letter from you in the post office, wh. had been there for sometime. This will apologize for my not answering it sooner. I am again call’d here, & shall attend untill the last of this month, upon the genl. & court of appeals. Mr. Jefferson we are taught to believe will visit this state in the course of the...
Your favor advising of the passage of the tonage & impost bills by both houses I have recd. It was my intention to have remov’d to Albemarle & attended the Chancery next month thence. But as it will be better to leave Mrs. M. here in that interval than there, where she has comparitively but few acquaintance, have postpon’d our removal untill abt. the 15. of August. The contest between the two...
Your favor of the 27th. ulto. found me in Richmond attending the chancery whence I returnd two days since. We move on monday next to Albemarle having already sent up the principal part of our furniture &ca. You will address to me in future by the way of Richmond. Our delay has been protracted too long to secure us, I fear, from the contagion incident to the lower country; as yet however we...
I flatter’d myself I shod. have been able by this, to have remitted you my proportion of the balance due Mr. Taylor for the land we bought of him—but my endeavors have been ineffectual, nor do any prospects that I have, warrant a hope, I shall be able to command it, within any short period of time. Thus circumstanc’d it wod. be more agreeable to me to disengage myself from the contract....
Letter not found. 19 May 1790. Acknowledged in JM to Monroe, 1 June 1790 . Reports illness of his daughter.
I have just return’d from the chancery court & sit out for Albemarle tomorrow. I shall remain there untill the appeals, abt. the 25. of this instt. This will be given you by Mr. Garnett a worthy & respectable gentn. of this town. He visits New York with commersl. views, & will be benefited by your acquaintance. He will consider any attention shewn him as a proof of my acknowledgment for his...
Your favor of the 17th. of June I have recd. & am sorry to find the most important measures of congress still remaining unsettled & in a very fluctuating state. The assumption will be dislik’d here from what I can learn, under any shape it can assume. Under the discussion it has recd. the publick mind appears to be made up on the subject, & will not readily yeild to any accommodation...
Yours of the 4th of July was the last recd. acknowledging mine by Mr. Garnett. Those of earlier date were answer’d from Richmond. I find you have had before you two subjects only, of consequence latterly, that part of the revenue business wh. respects the assumpsion of the State debts, & the fixing on some places for the tempy. & permanent seats of Congress. The latter we hear has been finally...
I have wish’d to partake with you fully in our mohawk purchase, & with that view have endeavor’d to dispose of property elsewhere, but without effect. As so small a portion therefore is no object with me and the possession of the whole, will make it a more important one with you, if it suited shod. be glad you wod. take it yrself. This disposition wod. suit my arrangments in other respects...
Letter not found. 8 March 1791 Offered for sale by Robert K. Black, Upper Montclair, N.J., 1966, with a catalog notation that the one-page letter concerned “the sale of land.” JM’s reply of 12 Apr. 1791 (DLC) makes it clear that Monroe made an inquiry concerning some books on behalf of “Mr. Brackenridge,” and possibly enclosed a list of the desired volumes.
I forget whether the deed of the Mk. land was made to you singly, or to us jointly, or severally. To the former a rect. specifying the object will do. In the latter case in either instance a conveyance will be necessary—as you are informed will you shape it & give it me for signature. I have no documents here of the State of our account. From memory I mention the following—you paid me in 1786....
I attended on the 15. according to appointment at Richmd. to meet the gentn., my associates, in the revision of the laws, on that business, but found only Mr. Nelson there. Mr. Lee & Mr. Tucker came abt. the 20th. but predisposed not to enter on it at that place. Three days were taken up in occasional consultations about an adjournment to Wmsburg wh. was advocated by the two latter & but...
I returned last night having made a long and fatiguing journey through the rain. Your servant soon after presented to me yr. favor with its enclosures. I sent off on saturday the packet to Dunlap so that on thursday night it will be recd. & may be published on saturday next. I inserted the paragraph I had first written, & made the concln. rather more pointed introducing the extracts, making...
The bearer delivered me the inclosed last night address’d to you and myself from M. Smith and M. Willet of New York. I have prevailed on him to convey it personally to you assuring him that no partial or seperate answer cod. be given. You will find it proposes to substitute Mr. Burr to Govr. Clinton as the candidate of the republican interest, in the contest for the office of V. President....
Abstract. 15 October 1792. John Taliaferro Brooke, having purchased lot 127 in Fredericksburg, Virginia, from James Monroe and Eliza his wife, conveys that lot to Robert Mercer for £435. Witnessed by JM, John Minor, Jr., and Joseph Jones. Recorded 8 Nov. 1792. Printed extract (Crozier, Virginia County Records: Spotsylvania County , p. 456).
I have just returned home from an attendance on the courts at Fredbg & Richmond & promise myself repose at least for a short time. I called on Colo. Taylor from whom I enclose you a letter. I found he had been very busily employed upon some subjects of an interesting nature since he reached home. He has written near 60. (56. I believe) folio pages upon the subject of the bank and the funds in...
Letter not found. Ca. 19 August 1793. Mentioned in JM to Jefferson, 20 Aug. 1793 . Seeks consultation with JM before Monroe departs for a court session (of the state district court that convened at Staunton on 1 Sept.).
I am still doubtful whether I shall visit Fredericksburg this term—if I do will call on you as I go down perhaps on Monday—but I shall in case I do not sit out on that day for Richmond, so that I shall not have the pleasure of se[e]ing you here till the week after. I found at Staunton impressions had been made by letters from Richmd. Mr. M. had written to Gl. Jones who was there to promote an...
I arrived yesterday too late for the post to bear the acct. of it. I found Mrs. M & the child well tho the former had been nearly lost by the sinking of the ice as she came. Mr. Kortright is living & perfectly in his senses, free from pain & perhaps not near his end. He is however on the decline & confined to his room. I find him most friendly & affectionate, but as yet I am not sufficiently...
I have been with Mr. R. & have given him no final answer. The fact appears to be that the message to me was directly from the President, so that a decision settles it. He has also had an interview with Mr. Dayton. May I request of you to go to Mr. Randolph, & settle the matter with him. I promised him you wod. in the course of ½ an hour. If it has not the approbation of my few friends &...
Mr. Madison will be pleased to receive from Genl. Wilkinson, or draw on him for the sum of three hundred dolrs. or thereabouts (due me by him) according as the Genl. shall direct. He will likewise receive whatever is obtained from Genl. Bradley from the sale of our Vermont property, or otherwise from the sale or upon acct. of it. He will likewise be pleased, in case he is applied to, give...
To morrow will make one month since our arrival here, and such have been my ingagments that altho’ I resolved that I wod. begin a letter to you every succeeding day yet when the day arrived it was not in power heretofore. You will readily conceive the variety of the objects to which I have been forced to attend, many of which requiring the utmost effort of my judgment, all delicate and...
Mr. Swan of Boston who has resided for some years past in this city in the character of a Merchant & in which line he has been extensively engaged will present you this. He leaves this for the purpose of purchasing & shipping to this country the productions of ours & relies much on the advances to be made by our govt. for the means. He will I understand be sole agent in that line of this...
By not hearing from you before this I conclude I shall not untill after you shall have commenc’d the session in Phila. Indeed I calculate upon hearing at the same time from Mr. Jefferson and Mr. Jones, for surely they will not decline writing by you to be forwarded thence with your communications. I therefore wait the lapse of sufficient time to bring yr. letters here with that kind of...
I enclose you three letters one for Mr. R. and the other two for whom ever you may think it best to direct them. You will in case they are delivered take a copy of one for yr.self, for I have not had time to write you nor indeed is it necessary on that subject as I send them open to yr. inspection. You will know whether there is any thing in the report & act accordingly either by presenting or...
I have addressed to your care a letter for Mr. R. & two others, to be addressed by you according to circumstances either to Langdon, Burr, Butler, Ross or any other person in case you shod. deem it proper to be presented at all & sent them in a packet by Havre. This which covers one for Mr. R. is to go by Bordeaux. I submit it entirely to you either to present or suppress it as the state of...
I was yesterday favored with yours of the 4th. of Decr. the only one yet recd. I had perfectly an[ti]cipated the secret causes & motives of the western business, and was extremely happy to find that the patriotism of the people in every quarter, left to its own voluntary impulse and without any information that was calculated to stimulate it, was sufficient to triumph over the schemes of...
Being under the necessity of explaining the motives of my conduct upon my arrival, to the Executive, & in consequence of presenting a statmt. of the circumstances under which I acted, I have thought I could not better convey my ideas to you on that head than by enclosing a copy of the paper. This will of course be kept from Mr. R. because of his official station, & all others from whom it...
I was sometime since favd. with yours of the 11. of March being the second since I left America. You were I presume soon after the date of that in possession of several from me, of two more especially which opened fully the state of things here under the impression of Mr. Jay’s treaty, and which state has not been essentially varied since: for as all communication upon the subject of that...
I have recd. from you 3. letters of which that of the sixth of April was the last. Dr. Edwards by whom it was sent has not yet arrived in Paris so that I am yet to receive his communications upon the state of our affairs. The cypher was recd. in this last letter, and by which I have been highly gratified for it will greatly facilitate our future correspondence. Since my last the committee of...
I send herewith a copy of the constitution reported by the committee of 11. & which will be discussed in the course of a few days. A doubt arises with many upon the propriety of the executive organizn., & some wish and with a view of strengthening it that the number be reduc’d to 3—but this wod. certainly produce the opposit effect, for the annual rotation by the with-drawal of one & the...
I received yours of the 26. of march and had before received those of the 4th. of Decr. 11 of march and 6th. of April which comprize all that I have received since my arrival here. I am happy to hear that you judged it expedient to deliver my letter of the 18th. of Decr. to Mr. R. because I think it could in no view do any harm, & might possibly in a particular view do some good. I wait with...
I had began a long letter to you in cypher, it appearing the British have commenc’d seizing my letters, but which not being complete I forward the enclosed by the present private opportunity, & which being on the moment of departure prohibits more being added than that the comn. is intended as a friendly deposit in your hands & for the purpose of guarding my reputation from unjust attacks...
Soon after my arrival here last year I found it necessary to appoint some one consul provisionally & in consequence appointed Mr. Skipwith to that office & announc’d him to this govt. as well as our own: but before this step was known the President had nominated a Mr. Pitcairn for that place. Mr. P. being by birth a British subject & having latterly become an American citizen & in consequence...
Yours of the 2d. of May is the last with which I have been favd., tho most probably this is owing to the seizure of our vessels by the British & the free use I hear they make of my correspondence. Since my last to you Mr. Masons copy of the treaty with such proceedings of the senate upon it as were published up to the 3. of July have arrived here: and since which we have seen the discussions...
I send you herewith an invoice of the articles purchased for you according to yr request & by wh. the duties will be paid. The price will I fear exceed what you expected, for by Dr. Edwards acct. the reports in America were very erroneous in this respect. It is however in my opinion comparatively with what is usual in America very cheap. In the bed there are abt. 80. French ells of Damask...
I wrote you yesterday with a view of sending the letter by the same vessel which takes the articles we have purchased for you—but as an excellent opportunity, that of Mr. Murray a very worthy young man, offers, I shall avail myself of it not only to send the letter of yesterday but to add something to it. Perhaps these articles may likewise be sent by the same opportunity, altho the vessel...
To day the members of the Directoire are to be chosen. Yesterday the two houses were organised and the prospect is that the present will be a propitious Era in the history of the revolution. The spirit of dissention seems already to be checked by the seperation of the members into different chambers. If suitable men are put into the Directoire the happiest effects must result from the change,...
The gentn. (Mr Murray) by whom my letters are forwarded was detained longer by contrary winds in Engld. than was expected. I endeavor however to repr. the injury of delay in my other communications by adding to them what intervenes before his departure. The govt. is now completely organised in all its departments, & its effect the happiest that can be conceived upon the publick opinion. What...
Yours of the 6h. of April is the last I have received from you, though since that period I have written you eight or ten at least. The theatre too on which you are, has been and probably will continue to be an interesting one, for it is presumeable the same subject which creates such solicitude among the People at large, will produce a like effect among their representatives. Certain it is,...
I think I mentioned to you sometime since that Mr. Paine was with me. Upon my arrival I found him in prison, & as soon as I saw my application in his behalf would be attended to, I asked his release & obtained it. But he was in extreme ill health, without resource, & (affrs. being unsettled) not without apprehensions of personal danger, & therefore anxious to avail himself as much as possible...
This will accompany your china which is addressed to Mr. Yard. I enclose also the charge by wh. you will be able to pay the duty. About a fortnight past I was informed by the minister of foreign affairs that the government had at length resolved how to act with us in respect to our treaty with England . That they considered it as having violated or rather annulled our treaty of alliance with...
I have not recd. a line from you since June last altho’ I have written you vols.: In my last I communicated to you that this govt. had resolved to send an Envoy Extry. to the U. States to complain of our treaty &ca with Engld. & from wh. it had been diverted (if it is diverted as I presume it is) by my earnest representations agnst it, but that it was still dissatisfied & wod. complain in...
I have within a few days past received yours of Febry. 26th. by the French consul, the only one since June last. That spoken of from Mr. Jones has not come to hand. I informed you sometime since that this government had taken up the treaty with a high tone ( our treaty with England ) appointed forthwith an envoy extra. to repair to the United States and with instructions in case he did not...
Yours of the 25. of Feby. is the only I have recd. for 12. months past, altho’ I have written unceasingly & fully. I suspect your letters are thrown over in the sea by the captns of vessels to avoid compromittment. For the future therefore it may be well to address by the way of Engld. under the care of Mr. Pinckney or in case he withdraws, some merchants deserving confidence. Mr. Yard wod....
Yesterday the Fourth of July was celebrated here by the Americans. I intended to have done it but having given them an entertainment last year they returned the compliment this. You will observe by the copy sent in that to the American government the term executive is used and not president . The course of the business was as follows . The project began first with the friends of the British...