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Soon after my last I requested an interview with Lord Hawkesbury which took place on the 2d instant, in which I informed him, that I had received your instructions to propose to his government, the regulation by Convention, of certain points which I was persuaded both countries would find their advantage in placing on explicit and equitable ground. I stated to his Lordship the concerns it was...
I enclose you two notes which I recd. from Baron Jacob, the Prussian minister here, requesting me to make enquiries respecting two persons mentioned in them, about whom he wishes to give information to his government. Will you be so good as make the necessary enquiries & communicate to me as soon as in yr. power what you hear respecting them. There is nothing new in our affairs here. The...
I have recd. yr. publick letter of Feby 14. & your private one of the 16. Having presented a project of a convention to Ld. H. in obedience to your instructions of Jany. 5., it seems adviseable, to reserve my communication with him on these latter topicks, for the opportunity wh. will be furnished me by his reply to that project, shod. the present ministry stand, wh. becomes by late events...
I received by duplicate two days past yours of March 5th. to which due attention shall be paid, in the progress of the business entrusted to me here. I had been advised by Commodore Preble of the blockade of Tripoli by the squadron under his command which he requested me to notify to this government. But as I doubted the propriety of the measure, I thought it best to take no step in it. Of...
My late letters will have communicated almost every thing that deserves notice at this time. The new ministry is not yet formed, but there seems now to be no doubt, of the present one’s withdrawing, & that Mr. Pitt, Mr. Fox, & their respective friends will take their places. The mind naturally looks forward to the consequences likely to result from such a change. The most probable & important...
As I shall write you a publick letter soon I take occasion to observe in this that the material changes in the ministry, are Mr. Pitt in the room of Mr. Addington, Ld. Harrowby in that of Ld. Hawkesbury who has taken that of Mr. Yorke retired; Ld. Melville at the head of the admiralty instead of Ld. St. Vincent. The Grenvilles & Wyndham refused to enter the ministry without Mr. Fox, who it is...
The late struggle in the parliament has produc’d the appointment of Mr. Pitt to the place of Mr. Addington, of Ld. Harrowby to that of Ld. Hawkesbury, the latter being removd to the home department from wh. Mr. Yorke retired, and Lord Melville to the head of the admiralty, in the room of Ld. St. Vincent. Not many other changes are made, the present ministry being formed principally of Mr. Pitt...
My last publick letter was of the 3d. instt.—my last private one of the 22d. ulto. In the publick letter I communicated to you what had passed between Ld. Harrowby & myself on the topicks depending between the UStates & this govt. in a conference specially obtained for the purpose. I omitted however what passed on another topick. You were apprizd by my private letter of the arrival of Mr....
You will receive with this a duplicate of a private letter sent some few days past by Liverpool. It is private from the reference it has to Mr. Livingston, of whom it may [be] better that any remarks however impartial which I make, shod. be thus convey’d. I hope you will receive that, as this being a bad copy from the press may not be easily read. I lately requested that you wod. be so good as...
I received lately a letter from the house of Mackenzie and Glennie of this city giving an account of a fraud which has been practiced on them in the name of Commodore Preble, by which they have paid to his account in favor of the United States £4000. sterling. I transmit you a copy of their communication and beg to assure you that I shall not fail to make all the exertion in my power to trace...
I have just received your letter of the 15. of April containing instructions for the prosecution of our claims and interests which remain to be adjusted with Spain. I observed with pleasure that the pursuit of that object is made dependant on the state of our affairs here. Being deeply impressed with the importance of the trust with each power, and aware of its relative urgency, I beg you to...
My publick letter of the 23. acknowledges the rect. of yours of 15th april containg. instructions for Spain. My private one of June 10th. communicated the incidents attending Mr. Livingstons trip to this country, as far as they were known to me, with my opinion of the probable effect of it. From every information that I can obtain, it seems clear that it has given to the govt. very great...
I have made it a rule to throw together occasionally what occurr’d to me of fact or remark relative to our affairs, and give it you in a private letter in aid of my publick one. Altho this has been done without method yet I have hoped that you would be able to extract from the melange something that might be useful. About ten days since one of our vessels the Virga. captn. Dixon (I think it...
My last to you was of the first instant, since which nothing material has occurr’d here. The ministry rests on the same ground; the King enjoys the same state of health; and no overtures for peace are known or beleived to be made on either side. It is said, but on what authority I know not, that the govt. of France will not be indisposed, in any adjustment which may be made, to the restoration...
I received a note from Lord Harrowby on the 3d. instant requesting me to call on him at his office the next day, which I did. His Lordship asked me in what light was our treaty viewed by our goverment. I replied that it had been ratified with the exception of the 5th. Art:, as I had informed him on a former occasion. He observed that he meant the treaty of 1794, which by one of its...
My publick letter, which with this is committed to Mr. Pinkney, gives you the substance of the last communication which passed between Ld. Harrowby & myself respecting the questions depending with this govt. on our part. Whenever this govt. finds that our’s is established in its present system, that the great mass of the people are with it, and that the party on which it has relied as devoted...
I thought that Mr. Pinkney had concluded the business of the bank stock, when I wrote the last letter, but found that he had left it unfinished, for Deal to which place he followed the vessel, being compelled to go by the situation of Mrs. P., & his engagments with the captain. The state of the affr. promising a prompt conclusion on his return he was sent for & actually did return & conclude...
On the 21. I desired an interview of Lord Harrowby for the purpose of “ascertaining the sentiments and disposition of his majesty’s govt. on the subjects depending between the two nations” to which I recd. an answer the next day appointing the 29. for the meeting. I expect on that occasion either to conclude the business for the present by a postponment of it, or in case of agreement, to fix...
I obtained an interview with Lord Harrowby on the first instant, which I had asked to ascertain the sentiments and disposition of his government on the subjects which I had long before submitted to it. The conference was free and full on every point, in which I urged every thing, which I could draw from the lights in my possession, to induce his government to adopt the convention which I had...
My publick letter of the 8th shew’d the state of affrs. here, since which nothing has occurr’d to change it, having recd. no reply from Lord Harrowby. As I inferr’d from what passed in the interview, that the cabinet was yet to deliberate on the whole subject, and of course that it had never acted on it before or even heard of it, for Lord Harrowby told me that by some casualty the project...
Since my last of the 8th. I have received the enclosed note from Lord Harrowby which puts the period of my departure hence for Spain at a greater distance than I then supposed it to be. His trip to Weymouth may not take him from town more than a week, but that it appears is not likely to prove the only cause of delay. If the subjects between us are to be discussed, as he intimates, which...
This will be delivered to you by Col: Tatham who I have known for more than 20. years, at first a clerk of the council at Richmond. I have seen him here from my arrival to this period, frequently, and at his request, as he is about setting out for America, give him this to you. I consider him as a firm friend to the UStates of wh. he is a citizen, being there thro the whole of our revolution....
I enclose you a press copy of my letter to you of the 14th. wh. I find however was not dated in the original sent by Liverpool. The postscript of the original is supplied by my official letter wh. accompanies this. I send this copy being anxious you shod. see the considerations wh. influence me at this time, or rather embarrass me. If I was to give an opinion as to the course to be taken, or...
Some days after Lord Harrowby returned from Weymouth I received from him a note of the 26th. ult. expressing his regret that he had been so engaged since his return, that he had not been able to see me, and, that he could not even then fix a time for the purpose. His note concluded with an invitation to dinner on the 29. at his house in the country. On an attentive consideration of the note...
The vessel has been longer preparing than I expected, tho’ I expect to sail to morrow, as she cleard out yesterday. I have my passport and every thing ready. I enclose you a letter from Mr. Livingston which seems to intimate that we are to hope little aid from France or rather indeed the contrary. It is to be regretted that he ever said one word to that government on the subject, since having...
After a voyage of 4. days and nights and of more sickness & distress than we ever experiencd before, on acct. of the continual tempest to wh. we were exposed from the time we reached the sea, and the smallness of the vessel, we arrived on the 12th. at Helvoetsluys, from whence we came here by land the day following. The vessel is also here & as our carriage & baggage is abt. being landed, &...
I left England on my way to Madrid on the 8th ulto. & passing thro’ Holland arrived here on the 24th. It is probable that I might have obtained permission of both governments to take a more direct route, by crossing the channel, but as that required a special indulgence, I thought it better not to ask it. I was the more inclined to prefer the former route, as it plac’d me at a distance from...
I arrived here last night in seven days from Paris which I left on the 8th. It is necessary to write forward two days in advance to Bayonne, to make arrangments for the mules which are to take me to Madrid. The intermediate country or the greater part of it is said to be almost a desert. There are but few taverns on the route and those furnish neither beds provisions or other accomodation than...
You may consider the letter wh. accompanies this either as a publick or private one as is most proper. If it may be taken as a private one that will be most agreeable to me, for reasons you will readily conceive. I intended to have written you fully on my private concerns, but really I have not time, as I do not wish to delay my departure a moment for Madrid, whither I set out in an hour or...
I wrote you on the 16. & 18th. from Bordeaux so fully as to leave nothing to be added here, except that I am still in health & to proceed on my journey in the morning, every preparation being made for the voyage such as guards procured, bedding & provisions bought &ce, in the same manner as if I was to travel thro a desert country. It is understood that Spain has declared war agnst England at...
I arrived here on the 2d. which was notified immediately to Mr. Cevallos by Mr. Pinckney, who acknowledged the notice in polite terms from Aranjuez to which place the court was moving at the time of my arrival. He invited us there for me to be presented to the King, which took place on the 13. The reception was very attentive & friendly: we had one interview with the minister afterwards, in...
To morrow our project will be presented to Mr. Cevallos. To prepare it and the letter which accom[pa]nies it required sometime, and to have the whole translated into French still more, which will explain why it has not yet been presented. Tho’ indeed not one moment has been lost, considering the extent and importance of the subject. Having been shut up exclusively engaged in this business, I...
I have yours of the 23d. ulto. by Fredbg. We had hear⟨d⟩ of yr. indisposition and inferrd from yr. not mentioning ⟨it⟩ it had been slight, and were happy to learn from Mr. Maco⟨n⟩ that altho’ it was more serious than we supposed, you h⟨ad⟩ recovered entirely yr. health. Every ⟨an⟩ticipati⟨on⟩ of th⟨e⟩ views of the admn. in this State seems to have been verified, or so many facts established as...
Jas. Monroe presents his best respects to Mr. Madison & requests he will be so good as forward the enclosed to Mr. Lee. As it is in answer to a proposition of his for supplying the State with arms wh. are not wanted at present, but in arrangments for wh. he may incur some expence it is desirable that he receive it as soon as possible. J. M hopes that Mr. & Mrs. Madison are in good health....
I enclose you a copy of General armstrong’s letter to me enclosing Mr. Talleyrand’s reply to Mr Livingston & my letter while at Paris, of which you have heretofore been forwarded a copy. I send also a copy of my answer to general armstrong which will be forwarded immediately to him. The substance of what is state<d> to him was communicated to me in a long conference with the prince of peace...
Although the negotiation with which we are charged with the Government of Spain is only in the earliest stage, yet we consider it our duty to communicate to you what has passed on that interesting subject, by the safe opportunity furnished by Mr. Gorham, who leaves Madrid to Morrow for the United States. As soon as the Mission Extraordinary was received by the King, & we were apprized by Mr....
Mr. P<reble> who will present you this has been with us since the commencment of the present negotiation, as a secretary, assisting in translating our communications to the minister of spain & Prince of peace into French, & those of the former from the Sph. into English. He has been of great service to us, indeed had we not had the good fortune to find him here, we shod. have been exposed to...
We had the pleasure to write to you by Mr. Gorham on the 2nd. of Feby. and to transmit a copy of our first note to Mr. Cevallos, and of the Project which we presented him for the adjustment of all differences between the U. States and Spain, as also of his answer to it, which we had then just received. We now forward the sequel of the correspondence, by which it appears that we are as distant...
Our last to you was of the first instt. which was sent by original & duplicate by Bordeaux, in which you had copies of our correspondence with Mr. Cevallos to the 28 ulto. Since then we have discussed the question relative to W. Florida, in his last note on which point is a passage relative to France of which I enclose you an extract. Having in our note to him of the 26th. ulto. stated that...
I heard last night of Mr. Lee at Bordeaux that my dispatches from that place on my way here original & duplicate to you, have both miscarried, one set in the brig george which was wrecked in the bay of Biscay, the other in the ship mars captn. Wilson, on the coast of Ireland. I regret this extremely because I began to hope daily of hearing from you in reply. I have since sent by Mr. Gorham as...
My last to you was of the 4th. by original and duplicate, to the care of Mr. Jarvis at Lisbon. Since Captain Dultons return we have done every thing in our power to conclude the negotiation by a treaty in case one could be obtained, or without it, if not to be had. The great delay of the Minister to send us an answer on the Western limits, induced us to enquire whether he meant to give one, or...
My last to you was of the 16th. ulto. which was forwarded, by triplicate, by Bordeaux. We have since answered his note the recept of which was communicated in the to you on the western limits, in which we have insisted on the rio bravo as the just boundary on that side, as he complained that we had misconceived the cause of the delay to which he had subjected us in the negotiation, and wounded...
I have received information that measures, imposing serious restrictions on our navigation and commerce, are taking in the North of Europe, with a view to guard against the disorder called the yellow fever. It is represented that these restrictions are likely to be generally extended in that quarter thro’ the means of a concert, promoted by one of the most influential powers and it is probable...
A favorable opportunity offering by Mr. Sarmiento who leaves this to day for Cadiz and sails immediately on his arrival there for Philidelphia; we avail ourselves of it to transmit you a copy of every note which has passed between Mr. Cevallos and ourselves on the points in question, since the 28th. of Feby. We forwarded you by the way of Bordeaux two copies of those which had passed prior to...
By my letter of yesterday you will find that the business is at an end with this government & that it only remains for me to take leave of the court & withdraw from Spain. Before I do this I shall see the Prince of peace & also Genl. Beurnonville, the latter to day, as I dine with him, the former as soon after his return from Madrid as possible. He returns to morrow. Mr. Pinckney who has...
We are sorry to inform you that the negotiation with which we were charged by the President with the government of Spain is concluded, after failing in all its objects, notwithstanding our unwearied and laborious exertions for so great a length of time, to procure to it a different result. We have heretofore availed ourselves of such opportunities as offered to transmit you copies of the...
The subject in which we have been engaged, is so fully before you in our publick communications, that there remains only one point for us to make any remarks on to you in a private one; that is, what will be best for our government to do in the present unexpected and disagreable business. We do presume that it will be impossible to leave it in its present state. The injuries which our people...
Captn. Dulton having occasion for money in the UStates with a view to his accomodation I have given him a draft on you for the amt. here, for my expences <per? > for the sum of sixteen hundred sixty dolls. 14. cents. I send you a letter from the Chevalr. Frere containing some offcl. papers relative to his recall. He is a worthy man a friend of the UStates. He feels some sensibility to the...
I enclose you a copy of a private journal which I have kept of the affair with this government, which connected with the letter from Bordeaux, of which I send you a more correct copy, gives a history of the whole transaction. I am well convincd that the affair at Paris had no other object than a financial one, and that success was expected from immediate accomodation, or the fear of danger on...
I arrived here on the 20th. and found my family in pretty good health. The French government is in Italy tho it is rumoured that the emperor will be here in a week or ten days. This if true is the effect of some new project. There is no prospect of any proposition being made on our subject in this stage. I have reason to think that it is intended to see the effect which the failure of the...