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I wrote you at great length by Havre on the 13th. by Mr. Hughes who was charged with the treaty. This will be forwarded by Mr. derieux by whom it was intended to have sent the original instruments, but he being forc’d to take the route of Bordeaux, and an opportunity offering by Havre, we committed them to Mr. Hughes, & send copies by Mr. Derieux. I detained this Latter gentn. here some days...
Since the conclusion of the treaty with France for the purchase of Louisiana, which was forwarded to you on the 13. by Mr. Hughes, with a joint letter from my colleague and myself, I feel much at a loss what part to take respecting the Floridas. There are some considerations in favor of an immediate pursuit of that object with Spain which have great weight on my mind. The cession of Louisiana...
You will receive herewith a copy of the treaty and conventions which we have concluded with the French republick for the cession of Louisiana, the original of which was sent by Mr Hughes, and a copy lately by the way of England. This will be forwarded by Mr. Derieux respecting whom I wrote you in my last communication. Mr. Derieux is the person who was engaged to take our first dispatch to the...
It is highly important that the Congress be immediately called and the treaty & conventions we have formed be carried into immediate effect, in all their stipulations. If the measure we have adopted is approved, no delay shod. occur, in performing what we are to perform, since a failure in any one point in the time specified may defeat & I think will defeat the whole. We shall be more full on...
We have the pleasure to forward to you by Mr. Jay the ratification by the first Consul of the Treaty and conventions, which we concluded on the 30th. of April, with this Republic. We have heretofore forwarded to you the original instruments, and two Copies by different ways, the original by Havre, under the care of Mr. Hughes, who sailed about two weeks since, expressly charged with that...
I inclose you a view which I have taken of the question whether W. Florida is comprized in the cession lately made to the UStates by France of Louisiana, in which I am led to conclude that it is. Indeed I think that the doctrine is too clear to admit of any doubt. The bargain is proportionally a more advantageous one to us. You will see by our joint letter the propriety of an early decision on...
In our publick communications we have been so full that little is left to be added here. I inclose you a letter open addressed to Genl. Mason, W. C. Nicholas & Mr. Breckinridge containing a statment of facts relative to what has occurr’d here which I have thought it proper to put under yr. controul. You may either deliver or retain it to be returned to me when I get back to America....
Since my letter of yesterday I have had an interesting communication with the minister of foreign affairs. Our letter had been restored to Mr. Livingston by Mr. Marbois in a casual interview who also shewed him the order to Mr. Pichon which was substituted to it. To see that order and receive one to him for the surrender of the country to the United States I called yesterday evening by...
I forward the inclosed to Havre in the hope it may find Mr. Jay there & be conveyed with our other dispatches by him. I shall now decide in a few days on the question relative to my trip to Spn. & inform you of it by the first opportunity. I shall certainly not go unless I find I may with safety as to things here & with some hope of advantage there. The French are in complete possession of...
We have recd. yr. communications of the 18. and 20. of April & after due consideration deem it most adviseable that I shod. proceed immediately to England. The departure of Mr. King from that country at the commencment of a war between it & France, without nominating a chargé des affaires may expose our commercial concerns to much embarrassment if there is no one there soon to take charge of...
11 July 1803, Paris . “Permit me to present to yr. acquaintance & attention the bearer Mr. Helbran a naturalised citizen of the UStates. He is a young man of merit of very respectable connections, who reside principally at Bordeaux, and he returns to the UStates with commercial views where he has resided for several years, as his documents shew. Having recd. much attention from his friends...
We have been honored by your favors of the 18th April & the 28th May, as they both relate to measures that might lead to the accomplishment of the Treaty which was executed previous to their arrival no remarks upon them are necessary Except that one idea is held out in the last that Britain interested herself in preventing the possession of Louisiana by France. The fact is that she was totally...
I left Paris on the 12. and arrived here last night very much fatigued with the journey. I have not announc’d my arrival to the minister of foreign affairs, but shall do it tomorrow and endeavor to obtain my recognition of the king as soon as possible. My last to you was of the 19th. ulto. in which I informed you that I shod. sit out for this place in a short time, in obedience to the views of...
I am too recently on this theatre to give you any information of the state of public affairs which you will not obtain of the Gazettes, wh. I shall therefore not repeat. It will be more useful to go back to the transactions in which I have been lately engaged, and to communicate some incidents which occurrd in them, with which you are not yet acquainted. The pressure of business at the time,...
On the 20th Ulto. I wrote Lord Hawkesbury by Mr. Sumter & apprized him of my arrival in town in the character of Minister Plenipotentiary from the United States to his Britannic Majesty & requested that he would be pleased to appoint a time when I might have the honor to wait on him with my letters of credence. His Lordship answered that he would receive me the next day at one oclock at his...
I have seen Ld. Hawkesbury & expect to be presented to the King soon. I shall mention in my next publick letter what passed, which was not material, otherwise than as it alluded to the state in wh. I found the negotiation when I arrived at Paris, & the late treaty formed with G. B. for admitting her into the mississippi by Mr. King as I understand is the case of which I had heard nothing & of...
Jas. Monroe has the pleasure to enclose to Mr. Madison a power of attorney from Genl. La Fayette relative to whom he will shortly write him more fully. He can not omit adding here that that respectable & virtuous character merits all the regard which America has never ceased to entertain for him. RC ( DLC : Rives Collection, Madison Papers). Docketed by JM: “Monroe Js. Aug. 1. 1803. inclosing...
I expected to have been presented to the King at the last levee according to the intimation of Lord Hawkesbury at our interview on my arrival; but the day before the levee Mr. Hammond called to express the regret of Lord Hawkesbury that the death of Lord Bristol the father of Lady Hawkesbury, which was known only the night before, put it out of his Lordships power to accompany me to the court...
A knowledge that there exists a disposition to misrepresent all the facts relative to the late negotiation at Paris, induc’d me in my first private communications to you to put in your possession the means of doing justice to the parties concern’d and interested in that event. Every thing that I stated or suggested in my letters by Mr. Hughes and Mr. Jay has been confirmed since. I doubted...
I wrote you lately by Mr. Baring since which nothing material has occurr’d here, except that I was called on yesterday by Sr. Stephen Cotterel & notified that I should be presented to the King on wednesday next. After the presentation I shall give you the result. The inclosed which I recd. last night from Paris by an American gentleman, containing important information, is therefore...
I intended to have written you at some length by this opportunity, but my engagements, of various kinds have put it out of my power. I send a triplicate of my last letter since which nothing interesting has occured, except my presentation to the court, or rather the King, which was attended by no remarkable circumstance. His deportment was civil & conciliating, as mine certainly was. The...
I was presented by Lord Hawkesbury to the King, on Wednesday the 17 instant, who recieved me with attention. The audience, according to usage was private, no other person being present. I endeavored in a short address which the occasion invites, is always expected & I believe made, to do justice to the amicable policy of our Government towards Great Britain. I informed his Majesty that I was...
You will receive within copies of Mr. Livingstons letter & my reply. I have made the correspondence with Mr. Marbois a publick document as it ought to be; but I prefer enclosing these in a private letter, leaving it to you to consider them as the one or other, as you find best. My publick letter will admit of either disposition. My motive for so doing is that of delicacy to Mr. L. You will see...
I wrote you yesterday by the Iris a publick & private letter: the first bore date the 31. of augt. the 2d. of yesterday. I sent you in the first copies of mr. Marbois’s letter to me & my reply relative to the guaranty of 10. millions of livres & also of the act itself, and in the private one copies of Mr. Livingstons letter to me & my reply on the same subject. My motive for not comprizing the...
Mr. Merry will have the pleasure to present you this, in whose favor an introduction from me is unnecessary. His official character will place him in such a relation with you as to honor him your polite attention.… The good disposition with which he goes out, towards our country, and the amiable character of himself & Lady, justify a belief that yourself & Mrs. Madison will find them an...
I have been anxious for a moment of leasure when I might enter somewhat in detail on subjects of a personal nature. I am not yet in that situation tho’ in a greater degree than I have been since my arrival at Havre. I have forwarded the last letters by the Iris Captn. Skinner for N. Yk. & by Liverpool, that there is any hope of yr. receiving before the meeting of Congress. This gives me a...
From every thing I can hear Mr. Merry is a worthy candid man, & I hope you will find him reasonable & have an easy time with him. I think it will have a good effect to apprize him of the manner in wh. I have spoken of my reception here, as of the sincerity of my desire to promote the objects of our govt. in promoting peace &ca. A like course may be equally useful with Mr. Pichon to whom I...
The enclosed is an extract of a private letter of great length, which I have committed to Mr. Law, who sails in the monticello to morrow. Not having time to write a publick one, & wishing the information it contains to reach you, I have had that much copied to be forwarded by Mr. Merry, who sails also to morrow. A few weeks since Mr. Erving stated to me the conduct of the press gangs towards...
Since writing the within letter I have seen Mr. Merry on [ sic ] had an interesting conversation with him on our affrs. especially the impressment of our seamen. I have given you an acct. of it in a letter committed to his care, but it may be well to add it here also; He told me that he had confer’d with Ld. H. on that subject as he had promised me, and that he was instructed by Ld. H. to...
28 September 1803, London . Introduces the bearer, Mr. Halsey, “a respectable citizen” of Rhode Island. “He has been introduced to me as a young man of the best connections there, and I have understood from the best authority, that his character & conduct in Europe, have been such as might be expected from a person well educated and connected in the UStates. I shall thank you to present Mr....
Since my last nothing material has occurr’d here or in any other quarter that has come to my knowledge in which the United States are interested. On the impressment of our seamen and some other interferences with our commerce, I propose shortly to address a note to the Secretary of State for foreign affairs, to which I have reason to expect that a suitable attention will be paid. I took...
I have not yet presented a note to this govt. respecting the impressment of our seamen, as I intimated to you in my last I shod. do. Mr. Erving is very attentive to the object, who most probably obtains every thing that can be expected on it at this time. I am persuaded that at no former period had we so little cause of complaint for injuries under this practice. Some however have occurr’d...
I enclose you a copy of a letter recd. not long since from Mr. Marbois and of my reply relative to the guaranty of ten millions of livres, of wh. you are already informd, and also of a communication with Mr. Livingston on the same subject. I comprize the latter in a private letter for the reason mentioned in my last, subjecting it nevertheless to yr. disposition. I have been very reluctantly...
Within a few days past I have received your letters of the 29. of July, the first addressed to Mr. Livingston & myself, the second to me singly, with seperate letters to him & Mr. Pinckney, & also your letter to me of the 29. of september. These are the only communications that I have recd. from you since my arrival in this country. The letters to Mr. Livingston & Mr. Pinckney shall be...
Since my publick letter of the 16. I have recd. yr. private one of July 30th. with the originals of those of the 29th. They were sent from Paris by Mr. Livingston who expressed his satisfaction to find that our conduct had been approved in the great outline and surprise at the intimation it conveyed of a wish that the money intended for France had been so applied. He had not then (28. octr.)...
I have just received your circular letter of October 22d. with a copy of the President’s message to the Congress at the commencement of the session. It is with the highest satisfaction I learn, that the treaty and conventions with France are ratified by the President with the advice of the Senate; that the ratifications are exchanged; and that the ceded territory will be taken possession of...
I have yours by Mr. Purviance of the 10th. Octr. and had before recd. that of the 29. Sepr. with a list of the articles from Richmond. You will have recd. a note of the silver smith at Paris of the prices of the plate, several correspondent articles of wh. we obtaind of the same man when there last at the same prices. This note is good for the price of workmanship; your ⟨weight?⟩ of the silver...
The opposition of Spain to our treaty with France, by her minister in the UStates, attracts some attention here, and is the subject of speculation in certain circles as to the causes & probable effects. Some suspect France at the bottom of it, others ascribe it to the measures of this govt.: but I am far from suspecting either of any agency in the affair. I see no reason to doubt the good...
Every circumstance that has come to my Knowledge since my last, tends to confirm the doctrine it contains, that no time was to be lost in taking possession of Louisiana after the exchange of ratifications. It gives me great pleasure to find that the President has adopted the most decisive measures for that purpose. I hope in the course of a few weeks to hear that the ceded territory is in our...
I enclose you the letter from Mr. Livingston wh. was referr’d to in my publick one of the 9th. It is to be presumed that this affr. is ended between him & me. I have adverted to the guaranty in my publick letter in all the lights in wh. it seemed to be applicable to the existing state of affrs. in relation to France & Spain. It appears probable that it may be necessary that some person shod....
I sent you by Liverpool lately a copy of Mr. Livingstons last letter to me relative to the guaranty, wh. communicated his having joined me in it. I send you herewith a duplicate of it, and a copy of my answer, which shews how the affr. is wound up. It is an incident wh. has given me much anxiety, as you will readily conceive, but I now flatter myself, in consideration of the manner of its...
Since my last nothing interesting has taken place in any view on this side of the atlantick. I have been told that my note was referrd to the admiralty, from whom a report had not been recd wh. was the cause of delay in the answer; that the delay in the admiralty was in part owing to some changes in it, Sr. Evan Nepean being removed to Ireland in character of chief secry. to the Ld....
I have yours of the 26th. of decr (private[)] with those which accompanied it. No change of any kind has taken place in publick affrs. since my last. It will I think be more easy to form a treaty than obtain thro’ the admiralty any important change in the system as to impressments. I expect to receive further instructions by Mr. Baring, & powers if it is yr. wish to form a treaty. The King is...
The king has been several weeks and still continues to be dangerously ill. The report of his phisicians has been latterly favorable to his recovery, but the result by those who pretend to be best informed considered doubtful. No communication on the subject has been made to Parliament, nor will be while it can be avoided. It is said that the house of commons has been well attended lately in...
I have recd. several letters of late from some of our friends, who complain of the arrangment or rather provision made in the treaties with France for American creditors, to whom they intimate an attention was paid wh. may embarrass our treasury. It is presumeable that we might have plac’d them on any reasonably satisfactory ground that we wod. have proposed; but as the payment of no part of...
I enclose you several letters on subjects wh. are explained by the parties, better than I can otherwise do. That of our friend La Fayette is no further material than as it mentions his not having recd. the copy of the grant by Congress. You will return it to me when we meet. Respecting those of Mr. Forbes I can only say that I think him a worthy man, very attentive to the enterest of his...
I wrote you on the 26th. ulto a private letter which was sent with my publick one of the day before by Liverpool, respecting some objections wh. had been made to me by some friends to the arrangment abt. our citizens creditors of France in the late treaties with that power. I promised you in that letter one to some friends, open to be delivered or withheld as you thought fit, explanatory of...
I have recd. yr. communications by Mr. Baring, & shall write you in reply by Mr. Smith who sails the day after tomorrow (son of Genl. Smith) to New York. I shall avail myself of the same opportunity to write the President an acknowledgment of his. The object of this is to make known to you the bearer, a Mr. Herries, who visits our country with a view to make an establishment in the western or...
I have lately rece[i]ved by Mr. Baring your letters of the 5th. & 16. of Jany: that of Octr. 24th. with the documents mentioned in it had reached me at an earlier period. I rejoice to hear that our government has obtaind complete & quiet possession of Louisiana. Independant of the vast importance of the acquisition, which surely cannot be held in too high estimation, it is very satisfactory to...
My publick letter and the papers will give you every thing wh. is not communicated in my letter to the President. What has become of the convention formed by Mr. King just before he sailed from this country? You have not mentioned it in any communication of late. Mr. Baring tells me it was rejected, wh. is the only intelligence I have on the subject. In commencing a negotiation it is probable...