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Letter not found. Ca. 19 August 1793. Mentioned in JM to Jefferson, 20 Aug. 1793 . Seeks consultation with JM before Monroe departs for a court session (of the state district court that convened at Staunton on 1 Sept.).
I am still doubtful whether I shall visit Fredericksburg this term—if I do will call on you as I go down perhaps on Monday—but I shall in case I do not sit out on that day for Richmond, so that I shall not have the pleasure of se[e]ing you here till the week after. I found at Staunton impressions had been made by letters from Richmd. Mr. M. had written to Gl. Jones who was there to promote an...
I arrived yesterday too late for the post to bear the acct. of it. I found Mrs. M & the child well tho the former had been nearly lost by the sinking of the ice as she came. Mr. Kortright is living & perfectly in his senses, free from pain & perhaps not near his end. He is however on the decline & confined to his room. I find him most friendly & affectionate, but as yet I am not sufficiently...
I have been with Mr. R. & have given him no final answer. The fact appears to be that the message to me was directly from the President, so that a decision settles it. He has also had an interview with Mr. Dayton. May I request of you to go to Mr. Randolph, & settle the matter with him. I promised him you wod. in the course of ½ an hour. If it has not the approbation of my few friends &...
Mr. Madison will be pleased to receive from Genl. Wilkinson, or draw on him for the sum of three hundred dolrs. or thereabouts (due me by him) according as the Genl. shall direct. He will likewise receive whatever is obtained from Genl. Bradley from the sale of our Vermont property, or otherwise from the sale or upon acct. of it. He will likewise be pleased, in case he is applied to, give...
To morrow will make one month since our arrival here, and such have been my ingagments that altho’ I resolved that I wod. begin a letter to you every succeeding day yet when the day arrived it was not in power heretofore. You will readily conceive the variety of the objects to which I have been forced to attend, many of which requiring the utmost effort of my judgment, all delicate and...
Mr. Swan of Boston who has resided for some years past in this city in the character of a Merchant & in which line he has been extensively engaged will present you this. He leaves this for the purpose of purchasing & shipping to this country the productions of ours & relies much on the advances to be made by our govt. for the means. He will I understand be sole agent in that line of this...
By not hearing from you before this I conclude I shall not untill after you shall have commenc’d the session in Phila. Indeed I calculate upon hearing at the same time from Mr. Jefferson and Mr. Jones, for surely they will not decline writing by you to be forwarded thence with your communications. I therefore wait the lapse of sufficient time to bring yr. letters here with that kind of...
I enclose you three letters one for Mr. R. and the other two for whom ever you may think it best to direct them. You will in case they are delivered take a copy of one for yr.self, for I have not had time to write you nor indeed is it necessary on that subject as I send them open to yr. inspection. You will know whether there is any thing in the report & act accordingly either by presenting or...
I have addressed to your care a letter for Mr. R. & two others, to be addressed by you according to circumstances either to Langdon, Burr, Butler, Ross or any other person in case you shod. deem it proper to be presented at all & sent them in a packet by Havre. This which covers one for Mr. R. is to go by Bordeaux. I submit it entirely to you either to present or suppress it as the state of...
I was yesterday favored with yours of the 4th. of Decr. the only one yet recd. I had perfectly an[ti]cipated the secret causes & motives of the western business, and was extremely happy to find that the patriotism of the people in every quarter, left to its own voluntary impulse and without any information that was calculated to stimulate it, was sufficient to triumph over the schemes of...
Being under the necessity of explaining the motives of my conduct upon my arrival, to the Executive, & in consequence of presenting a statmt. of the circumstances under which I acted, I have thought I could not better convey my ideas to you on that head than by enclosing a copy of the paper. This will of course be kept from Mr. R. because of his official station, & all others from whom it...
I was sometime since favd. with yours of the 11. of March being the second since I left America. You were I presume soon after the date of that in possession of several from me, of two more especially which opened fully the state of things here under the impression of Mr. Jay’s treaty, and which state has not been essentially varied since: for as all communication upon the subject of that...
I have recd. from you 3. letters of which that of the sixth of April was the last. Dr. Edwards by whom it was sent has not yet arrived in Paris so that I am yet to receive his communications upon the state of our affairs. The cypher was recd. in this last letter, and by which I have been highly gratified for it will greatly facilitate our future correspondence. Since my last the committee of...
I send herewith a copy of the constitution reported by the committee of 11. & which will be discussed in the course of a few days. A doubt arises with many upon the propriety of the executive organizn., & some wish and with a view of strengthening it that the number be reduc’d to 3—but this wod. certainly produce the opposit effect, for the annual rotation by the with-drawal of one & the...
I received yours of the 26. of march and had before received those of the 4th. of Decr. 11 of march and 6th. of April which comprize all that I have received since my arrival here. I am happy to hear that you judged it expedient to deliver my letter of the 18th. of Decr. to Mr. R. because I think it could in no view do any harm, & might possibly in a particular view do some good. I wait with...
I had began a long letter to you in cypher, it appearing the British have commenc’d seizing my letters, but which not being complete I forward the enclosed by the present private opportunity, & which being on the moment of departure prohibits more being added than that the comn. is intended as a friendly deposit in your hands & for the purpose of guarding my reputation from unjust attacks...
Soon after my arrival here last year I found it necessary to appoint some one consul provisionally & in consequence appointed Mr. Skipwith to that office & announc’d him to this govt. as well as our own: but before this step was known the President had nominated a Mr. Pitcairn for that place. Mr. P. being by birth a British subject & having latterly become an American citizen & in consequence...
Yours of the 2d. of May is the last with which I have been favd., tho most probably this is owing to the seizure of our vessels by the British & the free use I hear they make of my correspondence. Since my last to you Mr. Masons copy of the treaty with such proceedings of the senate upon it as were published up to the 3. of July have arrived here: and since which we have seen the discussions...
I send you herewith an invoice of the articles purchased for you according to yr request & by wh. the duties will be paid. The price will I fear exceed what you expected, for by Dr. Edwards acct. the reports in America were very erroneous in this respect. It is however in my opinion comparatively with what is usual in America very cheap. In the bed there are abt. 80. French ells of Damask...
I wrote you yesterday with a view of sending the letter by the same vessel which takes the articles we have purchased for you—but as an excellent opportunity, that of Mr. Murray a very worthy young man, offers, I shall avail myself of it not only to send the letter of yesterday but to add something to it. Perhaps these articles may likewise be sent by the same opportunity, altho the vessel...
To day the members of the Directoire are to be chosen. Yesterday the two houses were organised and the prospect is that the present will be a propitious Era in the history of the revolution. The spirit of dissention seems already to be checked by the seperation of the members into different chambers. If suitable men are put into the Directoire the happiest effects must result from the change,...
The gentn. (Mr Murray) by whom my letters are forwarded was detained longer by contrary winds in Engld. than was expected. I endeavor however to repr. the injury of delay in my other communications by adding to them what intervenes before his departure. The govt. is now completely organised in all its departments, & its effect the happiest that can be conceived upon the publick opinion. What...
Yours of the 6h. of April is the last I have received from you, though since that period I have written you eight or ten at least. The theatre too on which you are, has been and probably will continue to be an interesting one, for it is presumeable the same subject which creates such solicitude among the People at large, will produce a like effect among their representatives. Certain it is,...
I think I mentioned to you sometime since that Mr. Paine was with me. Upon my arrival I found him in prison, & as soon as I saw my application in his behalf would be attended to, I asked his release & obtained it. But he was in extreme ill health, without resource, & (affrs. being unsettled) not without apprehensions of personal danger, & therefore anxious to avail himself as much as possible...
This will accompany your china which is addressed to Mr. Yard. I enclose also the charge by wh. you will be able to pay the duty. About a fortnight past I was informed by the minister of foreign affairs that the government had at length resolved how to act with us in respect to our treaty with England . That they considered it as having violated or rather annulled our treaty of alliance with...
I have not recd. a line from you since June last altho’ I have written you vols.: In my last I communicated to you that this govt. had resolved to send an Envoy Extry. to the U. States to complain of our treaty &ca with Engld. & from wh. it had been diverted (if it is diverted as I presume it is) by my earnest representations agnst it, but that it was still dissatisfied & wod. complain in...
I have within a few days past received yours of Febry. 26th. by the French consul, the only one since June last. That spoken of from Mr. Jones has not come to hand. I informed you sometime since that this government had taken up the treaty with a high tone ( our treaty with England ) appointed forthwith an envoy extra. to repair to the United States and with instructions in case he did not...
Yours of the 25. of Feby. is the only I have recd. for 12. months past, altho’ I have written unceasingly & fully. I suspect your letters are thrown over in the sea by the captns of vessels to avoid compromittment. For the future therefore it may be well to address by the way of Engld. under the care of Mr. Pinckney or in case he withdraws, some merchants deserving confidence. Mr. Yard wod....
Yesterday the Fourth of July was celebrated here by the Americans. I intended to have done it but having given them an entertainment last year they returned the compliment this. You will observe by the copy sent in that to the American government the term executive is used and not president . The course of the business was as follows . The project began first with the friends of the British...
This with other letters & papers are committed to Dr. Edwards for you, & to whom I beg to refer you upon many points of importance for the most correct information; I have long known him, & from the confidence I have in his principles as well as discretion, have communicated very freely with him, & therefore refer you to him as to an authority pure, & a person to be confided in. Indeed there...
This government has at last and against my utmost efforts to prevent it sent an order to their minister to withdraw giving for reason our treaty with England and declaring that the customary relations between the two nations shall cease. I have no official communication and can’t be more particular . After deliberating about seven months they resolved that the honour of their country would be...
From what I see in an American newspaper and what Dr. Edwards writes me from London it is probable the English faction with us will endeavor to impose on the publick the belief of an intrigue between some men in America [and] this government to prevail on the latter to interfere in our interior and to make Major Fulton the organ—nothing is more false—the man has come here to get paid what was...
It is hinted to me by a person lately from London that it was said there I presume by King or Gore or both that Fulton had mentioned me in some correspondence hence to the United States perhaps with Governor Blount as being friendly to their interest, and which has got into Timothy’s hands and is considered by that enlightened statesman & his friends as a proof [of] a conspiracy—when this man...
The state of affrs. remains nearly the same since my last: except that upon the Rhine or rather in the intr. of Germany since the check of Jourdan or perhaps complete defeat & wh. I rather presume, the progress is impeded, & in Italy Bounaparte has gained another victory taking 5000. prisoners & driving Wurmser into Mantua where he is closely besieged. I think I mentioned to you in my last...
This will pass by the way of Engld. & will therefore most probably arrive safe. It is committed to Mr. Dease lately with Mr. P. in Engld. & who will deliver it to some careful person abt. departing thence for America. I enclose in it two letters from T. Pickering to me, my answer to the first, & a communication wh. finally wound up my discussion with the minister of for: affrs. upon the...
I have not heard from you since the adjourmt. of the last Congress or rather since you left Phila. after the adjourment. In my last I informed you that Adet was suspended & orders issued to seize British property in our bottoms & that the aspect here was a very menacing one, and in consequence my situation as the minister of our country a very disagreeable one, & wh. was made more so, after...
I recd. notice of my recall in Novr., Mr. Pinckney arrived here in decr. & I took my leave of this govt. on the first of Jany. so that you will perceive it was impossible unless I exposed myself & family to the danger & inconvenience of a winters voyage, to depart hence before the begining of April next, wh. we propose to do, in case a suitable passage can be obtained from any of the ports of...
Since my return I have devoted all the leasure time I have had in preparing my narrative for Mr. Bache but yet it is not finished. I suppose I have yet abt. a 3d. to do, which I hope to complete this week. The whole when completed will make a pamphlet of between thirty & forty pages. It has cost me much trouble on acct. of the necessity of observing great accuracy in facts, dates, &ca. Of the...
I tax you with H.’s pamphlet, requesting that you will return it by the post to Mr. Jeffn. You will be so good as tell me frankly yr. opinion of the footing upon wh. my correspondence with that Scondrel stands, and whether it becomes me to pursue him further. Mr. Dawson will be at yr. court I think on the 25. wh. I presume is yr. ct. day. If I can I will meet him at yr. house. My narrative...
You were so kind as intimate some time since you cod. accomodate me with a draft for two or three hundred dolrs. at Phil. At that time I thought I cod. get along without it, but the excessive charges attending the transportation of my furniture, far exceeding the real value inclines me to accept the draft if you can now furnish it with perfect convenience to yrself. I have read the speech &...
We are very thankful for the articles yr.self & Mrs. M. were so good as send us. They are really rarities and of importance in our present situation. We shod. however be very sorry if you reduc’d yr. own stock so as to feel the want of them. We send you two mattresses—one of hair & another of wool. 4. dozen of the better kind of diaper napkins & 2. of infr., very useful for common purposes. 4....
I presume you have seen Mr. Adams attention to me in his reply to an address from Lancaster. I send you however a copy in the enclosed gazette. I also send an extract from an oration delivered by Judge Addison of Pensylva. wh. seems to have collected all the calumnies heretofore circulated agnst me. My friends in Phila. think some attention due to the publication of this judge & Mr. Dawson...
If you can conveniently I will thank you to furnish to Mr. Jones for me abt. £45. wh. I am to pay at Fredbg. under an engagment wh. cannot be delayed. I have adjusted my affr. with Pickett by the payment of ⅔ ds. the amt. and otherwise securing him in the balance in three months, so that I am freed from that difficulty. This was done by the sale of my military land. I shall probably be down,...
I observe in the Aurora a letter signed Junius wh. seems to incite the respectable marshall of France to continue his essays agnst me in a manner best calculated to forward the views of his prompter. I suspect that piece was written, either by the volunteer aid or the inspector genl. I am surprised such a piece shod. have been introduc’d in that paper without a comment. I gave Mr. Dawson the...
Have you ever recd. yr. wine from Mr. Yard. Presuming you have not, I intimated in a letter by Dr. Bache to Mr. Yd., requesting mine to be forwarded to the care of Geo. Jeffn. Richmond, that if yrs. had not already been, I doubted not it wod. be agreeable to you it shod. be by the same route. I hope we shall receive it, since to me it will be a most acceptable accomodation having had none of...
Mr. Alexr. Stuart brother of Archd. has desired me to make known to you his pretentions to a seat in our council with a view to yr. friendly aid in obtaining it. It is impossible to refuse saying of him what I think, especially as my acquaintance with him is of ten years, commencing with his study of the law & continuing since. He is a sensible young man, sound in morality & political...
I was yesterday at Monticello when Mr. Jefferson informed me he proposed sitting out on the next (this) morning on a visit to you, to remain a day & return. Considering yr. present publick engagment, the business before the legislature & the part you will necessarily take in it, with his publick station, I was immediately impressed with an idea the trip had better be declined & so observed. He...
I did not receive yr. favor of teusday last, till late yesterday, owing to my having moved to my lower plantation; and my important papers resting still behind, did not get them till late today, on acct. of the badness of the weather. I comply however in the best manner I can with your request and that of my other friends. I send you a copy of my letter to Dr. Edwards and his answer, also a...
You will receive herewith pamphlets, the proportion allotted to the County of containing the report of a select Committee of the House of Delegates, made at the last Session of the General Assembly, on the answers of Several States, with copies of those Answers, to certain resolutions of the General Assembly of the 21st. December, 1798. on the Alien and sedition laws of the United States,...