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I have seen in a gazette from of Richnd. as published from one of Philadelphia, in a reply from Mr. Adams P. of the US. the following passage— I have seen an address from the people of Lancaster to Mr. Adams P. of the US. & his reply to it, both which papers were published in the gazettes of Phila., & afterwards in most of it of those States throughout the union. In Mr. Adams’s the Mr. As...
It wod. give me great pleasure to have it in my power, on yr. arrival at the seat of govt. of this Commonwealth, to pay you the attention to wch. yr. office in titles you to . But you have in that office made an attack on me, to deny to by wch. you attempted to injure my character in the estimation of my countrymen. This attack too was the more extraordinary because it was unprovoked by me,...
In the course of last year on the receipt of information from mr. Lee of Norfolk, that a Mariner from the United States Frigate Constellation, had been delivered up by a magistrate of the Borough of Norfolk to the british consul at that port and sent by him to a british island, where he was condemned and executed on a charge of being a mutineer on board the british ship of War, the Hermione, I...
I have had the honor to receive your letter of the 25. ulto. in which you are so good as to express a wish for my success in the discharge of the duties of the important & difficult office, to which I have been lately appointed by the President. For this obliging communication I beg you to accept my sincere acknowledgment. Permit me to reciprocate this friendly sentiment in your favor, & to...
An accident lately occurr’d which has given me great concern. The inclosed letter was received, with many others, several from your son at St Petersburg, & laid before me in the dept. of State. I opend it, without looking at the Superscription. On reading a line or two, I perceived the error I had committed, & searching for the address found the envelopes of two letters, one addressed to you,...
I have the pleasure to inclose to you a report of a the com: of the. 7th. on our for: relations with govts. in which the communications wh took place between the Ex: of the US. & the Br. govt., are review’d, & the a project of an act of congress, relative to seamen submitted to considerations—The object of the report seems to be and as it undoubtdly is, to place the controversy between the two...
Since writing the letter—inclosd, to Mrs. Adams, I have conferr’d with the President on the subject of your sons return, and am authorised to state to you, that in case of peace with G Britain, the mission to London will be offer’d to him. The conduct of your son, it gives me pleasure to state, has obtaind the entire approbation of the President.—It is hoped that it will suit his convenience...
The arrangment for the negotiations at St. Petersburg being compleated, I have the pleasure to apprize you of it, as that there will Still be time, to enable you to write to your son, by the vessel which takes his Colleagues there. The occasion was thought to be of that high importance, to require, according to the usage of our government, a special mission of three. Mr Gallatin & Mr Bayard...
I have the pleasure to inclose you a copy of a report of the committee of the H. of Reps. on foreign relations, in which the communications between the Executive of the UStates & the British govt., since the war, are reviewed, and a project of an act of Congress relative to seamen submitted to consideration. The object of the report seems to be as it undoubtedly is, to place the controversy...
I regret that I could not have the pleasure of seing you again before you left town, which I found that you had done, when I calld yesterday at your lodgings. I wanted to communicate more fully with you, respecting the part I ought to take, in the ceremonies of this day. It is possible you may be in town to day in which I case I may still enjoy that advantage. my particular object in sending...
I have the pleasure to forward to you by the mail of this day, a copy of the journal of the convention, which form’d the constitution of the U States. Congress having appropriated a copy for you, one for Mr. Jefferson, and another for Mr. Madison, I have chargd myself with the execution, of so much of the resolution, as relates to each of you. This instrument–having secur’d to us and to our...
I have had the Honor to receive your Letter of the 28th ult. covering one to your Son the American Minister at St Petersburg. I fear it will be too late for the “Hornet” sloop of war: but I have had it put under cover to Mr Barlow and sent to the Collector of the Customs at Newyork, requesting him to forward it by the first safe conveyance With great Respect / I have the Honor to be / Madam /...
I fear that the pressure of much business, and an anxiety to avail myself of a moment of leisuir, to write to Mr Adams in reply to his kind letter, made me delay it longer than I ought to have done. I now return you the letter—which he had the goodness to submit to my perusal, and with many thanks to him for it. The sentiments which it conveys do honor to the head & the heart of the author—....
I declind answering your letter, untill I could obtain some details, which were material, in relation to its object. The interest, which you take, in favor of persons a family, with whom you are so closely connected, & with whose merit, you are so well acquainted, commands my great high respect & warm approbation, and it would give me much great satisfaction, if circumstances permitted, an...
I find, on conferring with the Secretary of the Treasury, that it will proper for me to appoint a naval officer for the customs at Pensacola, and to allow him one thousand dolrs. pr. annm. salary, with the other emoluments incident to the trust. If you are willing to accept the appointment, I will confer it on you, & will direct the commission to be issued immediately. A sloop of war will sail...
I have the honor to inclose you copies of the papers requested in yrs. a few days past. That of the notes you will retain—the others you will be pleased, after transcribing, to return me. With due respect I have the honor to be yr. very humble servant Every thing you desire in the letter above mentioned shall be most strictly complied with. ALS , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. This...
I was informed by M. Paine that you had some papers of Importance to our governement which you Sometime Since expressed a wish to deposit in my hands. Being on the point of departing for the U. States, I have thought proper to notify you of it, and to assure you that I Shall be happy to take charge of Such papers. M. Prevost who will have the pleasure to deliver you this, will explain to you...
Mr. Monroe readily consents to an interview with Colo. Hamilton tomorrow at ten in the morning at his lodgings with Mr. Knox in Wall Street. He will bring whom he pleases. AL , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. For background to this letter, see the introductory note to Oliver Wolcott, Jr., to H, July 3, 1797 ; H to Monroe, July 10, 1797 . Thomas Knox, a New York City merchant, lived at 46...
Minutes of an Interview between Colo. Monroe and Colo. Hamilton at Colo. M’s. lodgings in the presence of Mr Church & myself. Colo. Hamilton came about 10 oClk in the morning introduced Mr Church as his brother in law. Colo. H. appeared very much agitated upon his entrance into the room, and observed the cause or motives of this meeting being he presumed pretty well understood, he went into a...
Mr. Monroe has the honor to inform Colo Hamilton that he arrived in this city yesterday abt. 12.—that Mr. Muhlenburg & himself are to have a meeting this morning upon the subject which concerns him, & after wh. Colo. Hamilton shall immediately hear from them. AL , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. This letter is document No. XXXII in the appendix to the printed version of the “Reynolds...
It was our wish to have given a joint answer with Mr. Venable to your favor of the 5th. instant concerning the publication of the proceedings in an enquiry in which we were jointly engaged with him in 1792, respecting an affair between yourself & Mr. Reynolds & into which, from the circumstances attending it, we deemed it our duty to enquire. His departure however for Virginia precludes the...
It is impossible for me to trace back at this moment, occupied as I am with other concerns, all the impressions of my mind at the different periods at which the memoranda were made in the publication to which you refer in your favor of today, but I well remember that in entering the one which bears my single signature, altho’ I was surprised at the communication given, yet I neither meant to...
I can only observe that in entering the note which bears my single signature I did not convey or mean to convey any opinion of my own, as to the faith which was due to it, but left it to stand on its own merits reserving to myself the right to judge of it, as upon any fact afterwards communicated according to its import & authenticity. with due respect I am Sir yr. very humble servt ALS ,...
Your favor of yesterday (to use your own language) gives an indelicate and improper coloring to the topic to which it refers. I will endeavor in a few words to place the points in discussion where they ought to stand. It was never our intention other than to fulfill our duty to the publick, in our enquiry into your conduct, and with delicacy & propriety to yourself, nor have we done otherwise....
I received your Letter of the 22d. instant by Major Jackson and have paid it the attention it merits. Always anxious to do justice to every one it would afford me pleasure could I answer it in a manner satisfactory to your feelings: but while the respect which I owe to myself forbids my replying in that harsh stile which you have adopted, that same respect with an attention to truth, according...
Your letter of the 28th which I have recd. claims a short answer. I have always stated to you that I had no wish to do you a personal injury. The several explanations wh. I have made accorded with truth & my ideas of propriety. Therefore I need not repeat them. If these do not yield you satisfaction I can give no other, unless called on in a way which always for the illustration of truth, I...
I do not clearly understand the import of your letter of the 4th. instant and therefore desire an explanation of it. With this view I will give an explanation of mine which preceded it. Seeing no adequate cause by any thing in our late correspondence, why I shod. give a challenge to you, I own, it was not my intention to give or even provoke one by any thing contained in those letters. I meant...
I hereby certify that it was not my intention to give any sanction to, or opinion of my own, as to the entry which bears my single signature, in the papers containing an enquiry into Colo. Hamiltons conduct, by messrs. Muhlenburg Venable & myself in 1792, but that I meant it to stand on the credit of Mr. Clingman only upon whose application the entry was made. Phila. Augt. 16. 1797. ADS ,...
Being informed yesterday in the morning, that a person, of the name of Reynolds, from Virginia, Richmond, was confined in the jail, upon some criminal prosecution, relative to certificates, and that he had intimated, he could give some intelligence of speculations by Mr. Hamilton, which should be known, we immediately called on him, as well to be informed of the situation of the man, as of...
Being desirous, on account of their equivocal complection, to examine into the suggestions which had been made us respecting the motive for the confinement and proposed enlargement of James Reynolds, from the jail of this city, and inclined to suspect, for the same reason, that, unless it were immediately done, the opportunity would be lost, as we were taught to suspect he would leave the...
I requested Colo. Burr to inform you immediately after the recit of yours of augt. 9th that I was not satisfied with the explanation given by it of yr. preceding one of the 4th, since wh. my mind & time have been devoted to other objects claiming with me a priority of attention. It was not my intention to make the subject into the discussion whereof I was drawn by you upon my arrival, a...
[ Albemarle, Virginia, January 1, 1798. In January, 1798, Hamilton wrote to Monroe and referred to “your letter of the first instant.” Letter not found. ]
[ Philadelphia, August 4, 1797. Letter listed in dealer’s catalogue. Letter not found. ] ALS , sold by Stan V. Henkels, Jr., April 21, 1891, Item 393-H.
Upon not receiving any answer to my first information and observing the enimy inclining toward your right I thought it adviseable to hang as close on them as possible—I am at present within four hundred yrds of their right—I have only about 70 men who are now fatigued much—I have taken three prisoners—If I had six horsemen I think If I co[ul]d serve you in no other way I shod in the course of...
[In the letterpress edition this letter was erroneously identified as being from James Monroe to George Washington.] May I take the liberty of our former acquaintance to confer with you freely upon the following propositions—You seem’d satisfied with those presented to the view of Congress on friday by Colo. Grayson viz. that exports be admitted down the Missisippi to N. Orleans as an entrepot...
I take the liberty to submit the enclos’d to your perusal. It was written before the meeting of the late Convention, but being inaccurately printed and delay’d in the press untill the week it assembled, it was for those reasons at that time suppressed. Had not the propriety of making my sentiments known upon a late occasion, suggested this mode, in that situation it would have remain’d. Having...
Having casually heard that it was requested by many of Col. Hamilton’s political associates, that you would nominate him as Envoy to the Court of Great Britain, and as I should deem such a measure not only injurious to the public interest, but also especially so to your own, I have taken the liberty to express that sentiment to you & likewise to observe farther, that in case it is your wish I...
My letter of the 8th, and to which I was on the succeeding day honored with a reply, was written in the belief that great exertions were made to convince you that it was the general wish of the community Colo. Hamilton should be appointed Envoy extra[ordinar]y to G. Britain upon the present occasion. As I knew that this was not the case, but on the contrary was persuaded that a great majority...
I was presented yesterday evening by Mr Randolph with the commission of Minister for the French republick, which you were pleas’d with the approbation of the Senate, to confer on me. As I had previously intimated to him in consequence of a conversation I had with him the day before the nomination was presented, that I would accept this trust, I have only now to request that you will consider...
I had the pleasure some weeks past to receive your favor of the 25. of June and should have answered it sooner, had any safe private opportunity offered for Bordeaux from whence vessels most frequently sail for America. I called the evening after its receit on Mr Morris, & put your letter for him into his hands so that he recd it unopened. He left this about the beginng of octr for...
Your favor of the 5. of June did not reach me till a few days past or it shod have been sooner answered. I am happy now to answer it because I am able to give you details of the Lady in question which will be very agreeable to you. I had advanc’d her near 2000. dolrs when I was advised here by Jacob Van Staphorst that you had placd in the hands of his brother for Madame La Fayette the sum of...
You will decypher this by the publick cypher in the hands of the Secry of State. A letter from you to Gr Morris inclosed to Mr Deas has fallen by some accident into the hands of the Directoire. It contains five or six pages. Is said to be very confidential, authorizing communications with Lord Grenville, &c. The person who told me of it and who read it, says it has produced an ill effect. He...
You will pardon the liberty I take in writing you upon a subject wh. has no relation to the publick interest when I inform you I am induc’d thereto merely from a principle of gratitude to make acknowledgment for the personal service I have recd from yr Excellency. The introduction you gave me some time since to this State, for the purpose of attaining some military appointment to place me in...
I enclose you a cypher which will put some cover on our correspondence. We have yet only 5. States, & not a man from the Eastward except Mr. Holton. There is nothing new without doors, wh. I have not communicated to the Governor &, of those within I must defer writing you, untill the next post; the present is certainly an important crisis in our affairs, but as I shall write you very fully by...
You recd. I hope by the last post a small cypher from me. At fort Stanwix you were necessarily acquainted with the variance which had taken place between the Indian Commissioners of the U. States , & those of New York as well as of the principles upon which they respectively acted & the extent to which they carried them: as I reach’d N. York about eight days after you had left it & the Ind:...
I enclose you a paper wh. will give you a state of the representation of the States, beside wh. little else hath taken place worthy yr. attention. Mr Jay is here & will I understand accept the office of foreign affrs. upon condition Congress will establish themselves at any one place. The conduct of Spn. respecting the Mississippi &ca. requires the immediate attention of Congress. The affr. is...
I have recd. yr. favor of the 27. of Novr. in answer to mine of the 15th. My last gave you the state of the representations here. The business of importance is still before committees or if reported not yet acted on. It seems to be the Genl. sense of Congress to appoint a minister to the Ct: of London & to give him instructions upon many subjects & particularly those wh. arise in the conduct...
Yours of the 4th. inst. I have recd. Congress are now closely engag’d in very important business. Reports upon our affairs with G. B. Spain & our foreign affrs. in general have been presented & alternately acted on. To adjust the points of variance between us & the former Court . It seems to be the general opinion that a Minister shod. be sent there, that it would tend to conciliate the...
I have lately heard nothing from you nor indeed from Richmond. I shod. suspect it arose from the adjournment of the Assembly, if I did not presume, had that event taken place, I shd. been instructed to whose care I might address my letters for you in Fredericksburg or Richmond. My letters to Mr Jones have advised you of the principles upon wh. our delegation actd in the questions respecting...
The arrangment in our foreign affairs begins at length to assume some form. Upon whatever ground they were taken up for a considerable time, either with respect to France, Spn. or G. B., the same difficulties arose. If it was mov’d that Dr. Franklin be permitted agreeable to his request to retire home it was firmly oppos’d by R. Island [&] Massachussetts . If that a minister be appointed to...