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Since my last nothing material has occurr’d here or in any other quarter that has come to my knowledge in which the United States are interested. On the impressment of our seamen and some other interferences with our commerce, I propose shortly to address a note to the Secretary of State for foreign affairs, to which I have reason to expect that a suitable attention will be paid. I took...
I have not yet presented a note to this govt. respecting the impressment of our seamen, as I intimated to you in my last I shod. do. Mr. Erving is very attentive to the object, who most probably obtains every thing that can be expected on it at this time. I am persuaded that at no former period had we so little cause of complaint for injuries under this practice. Some however have occurr’d...
I enclose you a copy of a letter recd. not long since from Mr. Marbois and of my reply relative to the guaranty of ten millions of livres, of wh. you are already informd, and also of a communication with Mr. Livingston on the same subject. I comprize the latter in a private letter for the reason mentioned in my last, subjecting it nevertheless to yr. disposition. I have been very reluctantly...
Within a few days past I have received your letters of the 29. of July, the first addressed to Mr. Livingston & myself, the second to me singly, with seperate letters to him & Mr. Pinckney, & also your letter to me of the 29. of september. These are the only communications that I have recd. from you since my arrival in this country. The letters to Mr. Livingston & Mr. Pinckney shall be...
Since my publick letter of the 16. I have recd. yr. private one of July 30th. with the originals of those of the 29th. They were sent from Paris by Mr. Livingston who expressed his satisfaction to find that our conduct had been approved in the great outline and surprise at the intimation it conveyed of a wish that the money intended for France had been so applied. He had not then (28. octr.)...
I have just received your circular letter of October 22d. with a copy of the President’s message to the Congress at the commencement of the session. It is with the highest satisfaction I learn, that the treaty and conventions with France are ratified by the President with the advice of the Senate; that the ratifications are exchanged; and that the ceded territory will be taken possession of...
I have yours by Mr. Purviance of the 10th. Octr. and had before recd. that of the 29. Sepr. with a list of the articles from Richmond. You will have recd. a note of the silver smith at Paris of the prices of the plate, several correspondent articles of wh. we obtaind of the same man when there last at the same prices. This note is good for the price of workmanship; your ⟨weight?⟩ of the silver...
The opposition of Spain to our treaty with France, by her minister in the UStates, attracts some attention here, and is the subject of speculation in certain circles as to the causes & probable effects. Some suspect France at the bottom of it, others ascribe it to the measures of this govt.: but I am far from suspecting either of any agency in the affair. I see no reason to doubt the good...
Every circumstance that has come to my Knowledge since my last, tends to confirm the doctrine it contains, that no time was to be lost in taking possession of Louisiana after the exchange of ratifications. It gives me great pleasure to find that the President has adopted the most decisive measures for that purpose. I hope in the course of a few weeks to hear that the ceded territory is in our...
I enclose you the letter from Mr. Livingston wh. was referr’d to in my publick one of the 9th. It is to be presumed that this affr. is ended between him & me. I have adverted to the guaranty in my publick letter in all the lights in wh. it seemed to be applicable to the existing state of affrs. in relation to France & Spain. It appears probable that it may be necessary that some person shod....