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I came here yesterday upon some business in the office of the Ct. of chancery, and shall return to morrow. I shall see Barrett to day and give him a line to Mr. Pope for the adjustment of his claim. Mr. Lewis and Divers have valued Thenia and children but have not furnished me the statement. They will on my return. I am likewise in your debt for the Encyclopedia. Be so obliging as state in...
By Colo. Smith secretary to the London Legation I wrote you in April last very fully upon our transactions previous to that date. I also inclos’d you the Journals that were then printed with the copy of a report upon the first paragraph of the 9th. of the articles of Confideration proposing a change in it and the absolute investment of the U.S. with the controul of commerce. I now inclose you...
I have been favor’d with 2 letters from you since my arrival with Paine’s pamphlet in one, and should have answer’d them sooner, but knew of your departure Eastward and of course that it would not have been sooner received. By the 25th. we shall be settled in Albemarle upon my plantation, the unfinish’d state of the buildings having prevented the removal there sooner. The appeals and general...
I send you the letters mention’d last night, among which you will find two, from Mr. Fitzhugh and Mr. Page each, cover’d by one from the old gentleman his father recommendatory of young Mr. Mortimer. He is extremely anxious to have him admitted into your office and under your care. The young man appears to be amiable in temper and manner, sensible, prudent, and is well esteem’d among his...
Your kindness and attention to me in this and a variety of other instances has realy put me under such obligations to you that I fear I shall hardly ever have it in my power to repay them. But believe me in what ever situation of life the chance of fortune may place me, no circumstance can happen which will give me such pleasure or make me so happy, at present or during my progress thro’ life,...
I came home yesterday, & should have called at Monticello this morning, but for an injury I receivd in one of my legs on the journey, which has inflamed it. A few days nurs ing will I hope restore it. I shall call as soon as I can ride out. I hope that you & your family are well, & that the business in which you are engagd has taken a direction satisfactory to you RC ( MHi ); addressed: “M r...
Yours of the 27 ulto. & that with the communications of Mr. Gerry I have recd.—I suspect also the infidelity of the post tho’ yr. letters give no cause for it apparently. But the game on foot, puts too much at stake with the principal gamblers, for them to lose any opportunity they possess, to forward their views. I am much deceived if the Virga. resolutions &ca are not the chief cause of the...
I deeply regret to have been compelled, as you will see by the gazettes, to advertise my lands in albemarle for sale, but in truth the debts which I owe, owing to bad management, bad crops, expensive trusts with incompetent salaries, untill the present, the savings from which, with the most rigid œconomy, will do little more than pay the interest, leave me no alternative. I am too far advanced...
Jas. Monroe’s best respects to Mr. Jefferson. If he has a moment of leisure, he will thank him for a few words on the subject of a note he left at Monticello yesterday, in addition to wh. he begs to trouble him with the inclosed. If the accommodation wh. it proposes can be given, it will essentially forward the arming of the militia of the State. He will be happy to bear Mr. Jefferson’s...
It was our intention to have passed a day with you & your family while I was in the county, but many interesting concerns and duties which require my constant attention will unavoidably prevent it. The arrangments which I have to make with my brothers family who arriv’d yesterday, will also take some portion of the short term allotted to my private affairs while here. As soon as our grandchild...
Shortly after the receipt of yours of the 24 th of October, & while the subject treated in it, was under consideration, the Russian minister, drew the attention of the gov t to the same subject, tho’ in a very different sense, from that in which it had been done by Mr Canning. Baron Tuyll, announcd in an official letter, and as was understood by order of the Emperor, that having heard that the...
I did not receive yours of the 9th. till the day before yesterday (15). I am sorry it will not be in my power to see you while at home. many considerations of a publick nature keep me here for the present, the most urgent of wh. is, the trials which are in train in several parts of the state of slaves on the charge of conspiracy & insurrection, and the applications growing out of them for...
I had the pleasure to receive your favor of the 11th. instant the day after I returned from Albemarle. It is very distressing to me to discuss with you the topicks on which it treats, but in the state in which things are it is certainly best to come to a perfect understanding on every point & to repair on both sides any injury which may have been received. To do you an injury or indeed any one...
Some days elapsed, after the receit of your letter of the 13. , before I could fulfill the injunction, of affording M r Mercer an opportunity of perusing, or, it, would have been returnd, immediately with my signature. I had nothing to alter in, or to add to it. I hope and think, that it will succeed, in placing the university , where it ought to be; & that, by means, of that institution, the...
Ja s Monroe’s best respects to M r Jefferson — He hastens to communicate to him the very interesting intelligence rec d this evening from the Secry of the navy , on which he gives him his most sincere congratulations RC ( DLC : TJ Papers , 199:35463); partially dated at foot of text; endorsed by TJ as a letter of 23 Sept. 1813 received the following day.
You have before this I presume heard of the death of Colo. Geo. Mason which was about the 8th. of this month of the gout in the stomack. His patriotic virtues thro the revolution will ever be rememberd by the citizens of this country, and his death at the present moment will be sensibly felt by the republican interest. We intended to have rested a day or two with him on our way, and this event...
Yesterday in concert with Mr. Izard to whose wishes I am forced to accomodate I agreed to the postpon’ment of the report upon weights and measures untill the first monday in Decr., that Mr. Ritenhouse might in the mean time make the experiment of the rod. It was moved by Mr. Ellsworth and seconded by Mr. Read to postpone it untill the next session, but withdrawn upon this motion. Mr. Sherman...
I have received Mr. Hopkinsons letter enclosing from the office of finance a bill containing 506 ⅔ dolrs. which I will negotiate agreeably to your desire, pay the Intendant the sum you owe him and transmit the balance. The committee, of which I am a member, appointed to view the country around Georgeton under the Princeton engagement set out this morning upon that business. I think with you...
Col: Sullivan of Massachussetts having intimated to me his intention of visiting certain parts of Virg a , & of calling on you, I have taken the liberty of giving him this letter of introduction to your acquaintance. He is a son of gov r Sullivan and was Secretary to M r Bowdoin, in his mission to Spain, in which character I became acquainted with him, at London in 1805. Our acquaintance has...
I expected long before this to have had the pleasure of seeing you in Albemarle , but the necessity of being here, on the receit of Gen l Jackson ’s report, of his operations in Florida , & in the expectation of the return of our commiss rs from Buenos Ayres , whom I wishd to meet, detaind me in Loudoun till lately, when on the occurrence of both events I returnd to the city. The occurrence at...
Jas. Monroe’s best respects to Mr. Jefferson. As the person for whose benefit the enclosed was intended has left this for Washington it is thought best to return it. It is presumed that every thing appertaing. to that object will be settled at Washington with that person; but shod. the contrary be the case, and it be proper to execute any thing here, J.M. will with pleasure attend to it when...
I have had the pleasure to receive your favor of the second instant, with one enclosed from M r Duane, & should be glad for the reasons stated in yours, & the interest you take in his behalf, to place him in some situation, which might afford a subsistence to him and his family. His abuse of me for 4. or 5. years is disregarded; his real standing however, in the community, must be attended to,...
My last from Richmond in answer to yours of the 20th. of June has no doubt been received. The more I have reflected on the subject, the better satisfied I am of the impolicy of assuming the state debts. The diminishing the necessity for State taxation will undoubtedly leave the national government more at liberty to exercise its powers and encrease the subjects on which it will act, for that...
Since my last we have received no communication from Mr Rush, on the subject of Mr Cannings proposition. From our chargé des aff rs in France a letter has been recently rec d by which it appears that the British Ambassador there, had intimated to the French Minister of foreign affairs, the desired expectation of his gov t that no measure should be decided on, by the allied powers, without a...
As I so lately wrote you by Mr. Short and have since daily expected to see you here I did not propose writing you till after I should have that pleasure; but as I begin to fear you will not abate that firmness and decision which you have frequently shewn in the service of your country even upon this occasion, and as I have had an opportunity since I wrote last of being better informed of the...
I have to acknowledge three letters from you, of the 8 th 13 th & 15 th of this month . The note, in the first, of the different kinds of wines, to be procur’d in France & Italy , and of the persons to be applied to for them, will be of great service to me. I shall immediately profit of it, and shall be very glad, to be able, to render you, any service by extending the order, to such as you...
The whole amount of claims of the state of Virg a , against the UStates, which has been presented, is not more than 50,000 dol rs , of which 11.000 have been suspended a long time, for the want of satisfactory explanation, which it is apprehended cannot be given. The residue of the claims, that is, of the claims exceeding that sum, have been presented by the agent of the State, M r C. Selden,...
In case you shod. have recd. the enclosed already, permit me to request you will be so kind, as forward them to Mr. Beckley; to whom I promised a copy of both papers: but you will retain them if you have not. It is mortifying the election shod. be attended with any circumstance, wh. checks or delays the expression of the publick will: but I consider the affair as plac’d beyond all doubt. It...
I forward to you by this days mail a copy of the Journal of the Convention which formd the constitution of the UStates. By the act of congress providing for the distribution of them, one is allowd to you, & likewise to Mr Madison & to Mr Adams. The Intelligencer will communicate to you some account of the proceedings of congress on the Missouri question, & particularly of the late votes taken...
I send you by Mr. Law a book from a Mr. Williams of this place who was presented to me by Mr. Barlow, as an old friend of Dr. Franklin. He appears to be a well enformed worthy man. If you chuse to answer it I will present the answer. He stood ill with his govt. some years since, but is on tolerable footing with it now. Your answer if you send one will certainly be spoken of, tho’ I presume not...
It is painful to touch on other topicks but I shod. feel myself deficient in candor if I did not observe that at no period of my life was I ever subjected to more inquietude than I have suffered since my return from Spain. I have found myself plac’d in a situation thro’ the whole of this interval altogether unexpected & in consideration of the parties to it equally novel. It was my wish to...
My great anxiety to forward to you the account and receit for the sum which I paid for your mathematical instruments at London, when I should acknowledge your kind letter of the 18th, prevented my answering it sooner. To obtain them I was forced to ransack all my papers, which required much time, & in truth I did not succeed in finding them till this morning. I have now the pleasure to inclose...
I have yours of the 26. March. I enclose you a letter for Mr. Irvine , wh. as you know the part of the case wh. is agnst me, I leave open that you may see my explanation. I will thank you to have it conveyed to him. Whether it is proper for you to withdraw yr.slf from the attention of the friends of free govt. at the present moment, is an important question wh. ought not to be decided but on...
My last advis’d you of the progress of Spanish negotiation. Until that time the reference of Jay’s letter to a committee was , I believe, the point at which it rested ; but to enable you to form a satisfactory opinion of the object of that letter I transcribe you only operative paragraph in it. “ I take the liberty therefore of submitting to the consideration of Congress whether it might not...
Despatches are rec d from our ministers as late of the 31. ult o , at which time the negotiation was depending. On paper, serious difficulties seem to be remov’d, and few only to remain, the principal one of which is however important. Impressment is laid aside, for the reason urgd in the instructions to our ministers, which is strengthend, by being us’d as an argument on the part of the...
I have the pleasure to transmit you a copy of the report of a Committee of the House of Delegates on the proceedings of several of the States on certain Resolutions of the General Assembly passed at a former Session on the alien and sedition laws of the United States—as also certain instructions to our Senators in Congress on the same subjects. and am Sir with great respect and esteem your...
I think you showd me last summer a note of the courses and distances, taken by M r R. Lewis , of my land, lying between the old road, passing by my house, & the top of the mountain, being, the first purchase, which I made of M r Carter . M r Lewis made this survey at the time & in consequence of Mr Shorts purchase. I will thank you to have the goodness to send me a copy of that survey, as it...
Mr. Fenwick has requested me to state to you what I know of his conduct while acting under my ministry with the French republick. Altho’ it wod. be more agreeable that no appeal shod. be made to me on subjects of the kind yet it is impossible to withhold my evidence where it is called for by the party interested, especially under circumstances like the present. When I went to France Mr....
I receivd lately the enclosed letter from ch: Carter in which he proposes to submit the question between m r Short and me, relating to the boundary of the land purchasd of him, to your decision. I most willingly accede to the proposition, and hope that you will undertake it. It will take you a mornings ride, thro’ some rough ground, with a guide, which you may easily procure. You have all the...
An unexpected change has taken place in my situation since I had last the pleasure to see you. an invitation from the President to enter into the department of State will take me to Washington . Having accepted the office, I set out to morrow in the stage to commence its duties. this appointment subjected me, in the first intimation, to great concern, from a doubt of the propriety of resigning...
The bearer M r M c Cullock of Baltimore was introduc’d to me by a particular friend there, with a request that I would make him known to you. He is the son of the collector of that port , & represented to have made considerable progress in the knowledge of natural history, for which science he is said to have much taste and a strong passion. He has stud i ed medic i ne in Phil a , & passed the...
There has been great alarm here of late at the prospect of an insurrection of the negroes in this city and its neighbourhood wh. was discovered on the day when it was to have taken effect. Abt. 30 are in prison who are to be tried on Thursday, and others are daily discovered and apprehended in the vicinity of the city. I have no doubt the plan was formed and of tolerable extensive combination,...
The avidity with which I knew you sought retirement and peace, undisturbed by political occurrences, with the further consideration that no event of any importance had taken place since you left us, prevented my trespassing on you sooner. I am perfectly satisfied you will find in that retirement a contentment and tranquility not to be hoped for in publick life. And yours will be the greater,...
I have read with great interest & satisfaction your remarks on finance, which I return by the bearer. we are now at the mercy of monied institutions, who have got the circulating medium into their hands, & in that degree the command of the country, by the adventurers in them, who without mu ch capital are making fortunes out of the public and individuals. many of these institutions are hostile...
I had the pleasure to receive the letter which you forwarded to me through Col: Trumbull , & to apply it, with the best effect, to the purpose for which it was intended. Congress passed a law, under which a contract has been concluded with him, for the painting of four pieces; the declaration of Independance; the surrender of Burgoyne , that of Cornwallis ; & the resignation of Gen l...
Colo. Cabell furnishes an opportunity by wh. I enclose you a copy of Mr. Madisons rept. on the acts of the other states on the alien & sedition laws. This report has been two days before the house supported by the author Taylor & Giles, and opposed by two or three whose names it is not necessary to give. Its effect is very discernible on the whole federal party, some of the more moderate of...
I am inclined to think the mode by which a certain end is to be accomplished, refering to a subject in discussion when I last saw you, is of less importance than I then thought it. A gradual operation will not offend republicans, nor will an off-hand entire one, make friends of the tories. Sooner or later that party will rally and make another effort. That course which best preserves, at the...
I have been requested by Colo. Goodall who is an honest republican character, I presume well known to you, to add his name to the list of candidates for the post office in this city. You will get correct information of every one not known to you from our members in Congress. In a late letter to Mr. Madison I gave the details of some federal intrigues here during the Session of our assembly. He...
Yours of April 24th. reached me yesterday. Since my last the proposition of Mr. Clarke for prohibiting the importation of British goods untill the posts shall be surrendered and compensation made for the depredation on our trade, was rejected in the Senate. Upon the question the first section which determined the fate of the bill, Jackson and Bradley withdraw which left us 11. only against...
I regret to have to reform you of the death of mr W. Burwell which took place on yesterday, after a long & distressing illness. all possible care was taken of him. He was a most virtuous man & estimable member of the H. of Rep s . The treaty with Spain has been ratified by her gov t , unconditionally, & the grants annulled in the instrament of ratification. It is before the Senate, on the...