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After the most mature reflection I have at length yielded to my inclinations to suffer my name to be mention’d for a public appointment. If it takes place, unless some unpleasant reflections on probable future events should press on me, it will contribute greatly to my own and the gratification of Mrs. M. as it will place us both with and nearer our friends. But to be candid there is not that...
This will be delivered you by Mr. Peters with whom you are acquainted. He was presented me in a very favorable light by Mr. Beckly. Unfortunately my situation as he pass’d thro lately to Norfolk put it out of my power to profit of his acquaintance, and the dangerous indisposition of my child deprives now of that pleasure. Our Infant is in the utmost danger & I begin to fear that we shall want...
There are two persons in this place who according to the information I have recd., have respectable claims to the office in question. The first of these is Jacob I. Cohen , a Jew but sound in his principles, of fair character & much employed in the business of the corporation. the other is Tarlton W. Pleasants , a brother of the clerk of the h. of Delegates , of equally fair character, and...
Our correspondence will be printed today in a pamphlet, a copy of which shall be sent to you by the mail if it is completed in time. I have omitted in the publication every passage which had been noted by you, and added to the list of omissions, one passage, in your letter of April 11th. which speaks of the use made of my name for vindictive purposes, the publication of which could only serve...
On information of the death of John Page which gained general belief here, I wrote you a letter two days since, which had relation to an object connected with that event. The present accounts contradict that report & as I hope & believe on good ground. I hasten therefore to correct the error into which I had been led.   You are I presume by this time return’d to Washington. I hope that you...
We have the honor of addressing this by our worthy friend, the honorable Mr. Sayre, who was formerly Sheriff of London. The active part, which at the commencement of the revolution, he took in favor of America, is, we presume, too well known to you, to require a relation: and the loss he sustained, in consequence of his opposition to the british ministry, is not less a matter of general...
I parted from Mr. Madison three days past at my house. He was so kind as shew me your letter to him by Mr. Randolph. The state into which the conduct of an indiscreet man on the one part, and some very wicked men on the other, has thrown us in respect to France fills me with extreme concern. That he should not have implicitly followed your advice in all the affairs of his country is to me...
We have all been very much distressd, of the accounts recently receivd, of the misfortune you have Sustaind, in the fracture of your arm, or at least of one of its bones. We hope that it has not been so Serious, as has been represented, & that you are rapidly recovering from it— This is a moment, as you well know, when, in addition to the heavy cares which bear on me, the calls of the Members...
Since my appointment I have been extremely occupied in a variety of respects. I had likewise flattered myself with the hope I should see you before my departure till within a day or two past—but of this I now begin to despair. I shall sail from Bal: for which place I sit out in 4. days hence. Tis possible the vessel may not be ready altho I am advised she is. I feel extremely anxious upon the...
The intelligence which you communicated to me the evening before I left home, of a vote having been given in the H. of C. against L d C. has not been confirmed, and I fear will not be. Little, has been receiv’d of late from Europe , but all accounts concur in the probability of a war, which Engl d prompts & leads, that will become general. Nothing can be more unprincipled than such a war,...
I have just returned from Richmond & send the inclosed for yr. inspection in the hope that you may not have set-out to day for Washington, knowing that you have heretofore frequently staid a day longer than that which you had appointed for your departure to arrange more completely your private affairs. I take the liberty to submit to your perusal a copy of my letters to Mr. Randolph, being the...
M r Russell has arrived at New York & is expected here in a day or two. He made the second proposition to the British gov t authorised by his instructions, which you have seen published, which was also rejected, & in terms rather acrimonious, imputing to it a character—which it did not merit. This gov t has been sincerely desirous of an accomodation but it appears that the British gov t will...
It was my intention to have called on you this evening, and to have presented in person M r Goodwyn, who will have the pleasure to deliver to you this letter, but have been prevented by the rain. He is a son, of M r P. Goodwyn, a member of Congress, I believe, during your service, in the gov t , as well as mine. Having purchased a part of my land here, he will become your neighbour, and I am...
By Mr. Short I have the pleasure to forward you a more complete cypher in which we will correspond in future. He will find you I hope safely arriv’d in Paris and recoverd from the fatigues of your voyage, and situated with Miss Patsy agreeably to your wish. In my letters from Annapolis I informd you of the latter proceedings of Congress and as I addressd them to Boston hope you received them....
I came here a few days past to attend the ct. of appeals, it being an irregular term and formed of Judges of the general court and some of those of the proper ct. of appeals, to take cognizance of those causes in which any of the judges of the latter ct. may be interested. Tis likewise expected a meeting of the gentlemen appointed for the revision of the laws will be obtained and that business...
The enclosed letter from M r Go relating to a subject interesting to you, and your family, I forward it to you with pleasure. we have heard with deep regret, of the afflicting calamity with which you have been visited, but well know that you will not want resources, to meet any disaster, to which, our nature is subject. with our best wishes to M rs Randolph & family, I am Dear Sir very...
Two days since I arrivd here after performing a tour up the north river by fort Stanwix down the wood—creek, thro’ the Oneida Ontario and (by the Niagara falls) part of Lake Erie, thence back by Niagara thro the Ontario by Carlton Island thro the St. Laurence to Montreal and from Montreal over Lake Champlain by Albany to N. York again. You find I have taken a rout different from the one I...
I have had the pleasure to receive your favor of the 24 th of sep r , to which I shall pay particular attention, and on which I will write you again soon. Nothing but the disasters here, and the duties which have devolvd on me, in consequence, the most burthensome that I have ever encounterd, would have prevented my writing you long since, as well as more recently. I had devoted this morning...
Since my last I have received yours of Decr. 11th. and Jany. 27th last. Untill lately we have had so thin a Congress that few acts of consequence have pass’d, a very pointed recommendation to those States who have hitherto declined, to accede to the recommendation of respecting a revenue system only excepted. Since which R. Island and Georgia have acceded to the impost fully, so that it now...
I came here abt. 6. days past to use my endeavors to raise money to pay the expences upon importation of my furniture. I have drawn on Mr. Barnes for 250. dolrs. wh. I hope he will pay. I think the time is expired when you intimated the sum plac’d in his hands wod. become due. I hope to get thro this heavy business without any very serious loss. Our assembly adjourned two days since. Of a...
Your favor of the 20th. of June I have received and am happy to hear of your restoration to health. Mrs. Monroe and family are in Albemarle whither I sit out in a day or two. They are well.—The assumption of the state debts is disliked here, and will create great disgust if adopted under any shape whatever. The minds of all are made up on it, and I doubt whether even the immediate removal to...
I came here a few days past to attend the district court and shall leave this place on the 10th. for the chy. in Richmond which commences on the 12. In Charlottesville in the case of Barrett the verdict and judgment were against you, deducting the interest as you had proposed during the war. He had no proof except that of Colo. Lewis to establish his claim (at the trial). Upon confering with...
Since my last I have received yours of the 11th. of Novr. and 10th. of Decr., the former by Col. LeMaire, from whom however I did not receive it altho’ I saw him, nor untill after his arrival nearly a month and then I believe by post from Phila. I have had the same difficulty with the cypher but from a different cause. The copy of that I sent by Mr. Short I left in Virga. when I sate out for...
General La Fayette left this for York, on saturday, and is I presume, now, near his post of destination. Whether he will proceed thence, by Richmond, to your house, or directly, to charlestown, & Savannah, & return by your residence, he had not decided, when he left us. Time, has produced less waste of his form, since you last saw him, than it does on most men, and none on his mind. His...
It was my intention, as it was my desire, to have communicated to the committee no part of your letter of the 13 th of Jany 1803, announcing my appointment, to France & Spain, and on that principle I acted, at the last Session. From this however, I have been induced to depart reluctantly, by intimations which have been recently given me, by some friends in Washington, that no evidence being...
Major General Brown, who commands the northern division of our army, will have the pleasure to deliver you this letter. He visits Virg a for the purpose, of manifesting his respect & regard for yourself & M r Madison & I gave him this introduction to you at his request. His gallant conduct on the Niagara frontier, in the last war, and his meritorious services, thro’ the whole war, in other...
I returned on friday from Albemarle without having accomplished the object of my trip by the sale of my land above Charlottesville. In my absence an alarm took place at Norfolk relative to the negroes, wh. was felt here, but which seems to have little foundation for it. Such is the state of things that it is hasardous for me, in regard to the publick opinion, to be absent from this place at...
My last advis’d you of my departure hence on the 24th of August last for the westward, with intention to take a view of the indian treaty to be held at the mouth of the big Miamis, and of the country lying between lake Erie, and the head waters of James or Potowk. river, with those which empty from either side into the Ohio, thence to attend the federal court on the 15. of Novr. at Wmsburg....
I was much gratified to find that you approved the ground taken with the Spanish minister , respecting the sp h colonies & in our affairs with Spain generally. the minister left this shortly after the correspondence for Phil a , on account of the ill health of his family, not in disgust as has been represented. He has since arrival there written me another letter, adhering to his former...
Our communication will be laid before the assembly to morrow with its doors closed. The objection which I suggested applied to a delegation of any confidence or trust over the subject, from the legislature to our Executive, not to the agency of the federal Executive in the affair. In the latter view I saw no objection to the clause, for what was proposed in that respect was precisely what the...