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J. M ’s best respects to mr Jefferson . He has the pleasure to send, for his perusal, a late letter from mr Rush , which it may be gratifying to mr Jefferson to see. J. M. will retake it, the next time he calls at Monticello . He hopes that mr Jeffersons health continues to improve. RC ( MHi ); dateline at foot of text; endorsed by TJ as received 17 Sept. 1818 from
I send you by this days mail, the documents of greatest interest, which have been presented to Congress during the present session. on our concerns with Spain we have nothing new, & little reason to expect a minister here from that country, during the session, mr Vives, said to have been appointed some months ago, being under quarantine, within a few leagues of Madrid, in consequence of...
Hearing that mr Webster & mr Ticknor will call on you, and indeed that their visit is principally intended for yourself & mr Madison, I take much interest in recommending them to your kind attention. They are known to the public, as citizens of great respectability & talents, and the latter, is well known to you personally, in those lights, so that little is left to me to add, than to bear my...
The view which you have communicated of the condition, relation, & disposition, of Cuba, & its inhabitants, founded on the information of M r Miralla, is very interesting. It accords also in every particular, with that which has been taken here, aided by all the light which we have been able to obtain, through the most authentic channels, from the Island. The people consider Columbia, too...
I arrived here two days since and sit out in return the day after to morrow for Phila. where I shall probably be a fortnight before I proceed on home. Here I have had an interview with the friend of Mr. or Mrs. R. each of us having a friend present , and which furnished no result, the business being adjourned over to Phila. where we meet the day after my return there in company with the other...
Yours of the 15th. (last) was left here by Mr. Tyler while I was on a trip to Albemarle. The necessity I was under of remaining here while the affr. at Georgetown was depending had delayed some arrangements on my plantation of importance to me. as soon as that affr. was settled I went up for a few days and was sorry to find on my return that Mr. Tyler had passed in my absence. I lose the...
Mr. Madisons propositions are yet depending and their fate incertain. The probability is they will pass in the H. of R. and be rejected in the Senate. The steady zeal with which any thing like a systematic operation on the British commerce, or indeed any branch of her interest is opposed, you have long witnessed and can of course readily conceive upon the present occasion. The opposition as...
I mentiond in a letter which I lately wrote to you, that I had seen in a paper from Richmond, a notice of an application which you had made to the legislature, for permission to sell a large portion of your estate, by lottery, for the payment of your debts, and that I should write you again on the subject. Since then I have been much indisposed, with the influenza, from which, I have not yet...
I returned from Albemarle on saturday & had the pleasure to receive your favor of the 28. ulto. on Monday last. I perceive that the idea which I suggested of a new and decisive effort, to avert the dangers interior & exterior of the present crisis, by a special mission to France & England, has not obtained your approbation. As the idea was suggested without illustration you will permit me to...
Your favor of the 11th. reached me yesterday. We were mortified to find that our letters had not reached you, but hope the obstacle at Richmond is removed before this. As Mr. M. has written you I shall say nothing at present upon the subject of affairs here. I shall only commence with the inclosures of your correspondence with Hammond which after perusal by your family and any others whom you...
The enclosed may gave you some amusment. I have read neither, and cannot therefore speak of their merits. one is attributed to armstrong & the other to winder. The book which you were so kind as to send me respecting Louisiana will be taken advantage of, in the contemplated discussion with the Spanish gov t . It shall be restord afterwards. your letter to Miss Bruff was sent to her as soon as...
A man of whom I heard you speak lately, as a gardener, to whom you had rented some land below me, called with M r Price, some days since, to rent, a piece of my land, on my saw mill stream. Finding that he was the person of whom you spoke, I observ’d that unless, I knew, that you consider’d him at liberty, to treat with another, I could have nothing to say to him He promised to produce that...
Since my last I have receiv’d yours of the 9. of July. I advis’d you therein of the progress that had been made by Mister Jay in the Spanish negociation , that he had brought a project before Congress for shutting the Mississippi and not for opening it for the term of twenty five or thirty years combin’d with some commercial stipulations , the latter to be the price of the former, although...
The session begins to draw to a close. The 3d. of June is agreed on by both houses as the day on which it shall end, and I believe the agreement will be executed. The inclosed paper will shew you the state of things with Engld. This incursion into our country has no pretext to be calld or considered otherwise than an actual invasion, and as such presume it will be treated by the President...
Altho I am persuaded you will have received the proceedings of our convention upon the plan of government submitted from Phila. yet as it is possible this may reach you sooner than other communications I herewith enclose a copy to you. These terminated as you will find in a ratification which must be consider’d; so far as a reservation of certain rights go, as conditional, with the...
The inclosed was lately sent me by Col: Newton to be forwarded to you. Since my last R. Evers Lee has been here and a suitable occasion presenting itself, I confered with him on the subject of the comr of bankruptcy at Norfolk, in which he informed me that William Bennett a merchant the brother of the person mentioned in my last was the most suitable of the two. He lamented that there was no...
Your favor of May 4th. was presented to me on the 24th. ulto. by Mr Pinkney. That of March 16th. has not yet reached me. You are so good as to offer me either of the governments of Louisiana & to intimate that they shall be kept open sometime for my answer. I should be very sorry if any injurious delay proceeded from that cause; I hasten therefore to prevent it. At one time I was inclined to...
We are still destind to have further trouble with Spain. It was hoped, that the minister lately arrived, would have terminated every difficulty, but it appears that he has come to act the part of his predecessor,—to make complaints, demand explanations & report them to his government, who may take as many years to conclude another treaty, as they did the last. This minister admits, that there...
I communicated to you, when I had last the pleasure to see you, that during the late conspiracy of the slaves in this state, I had, by advice of the Council, ordered a guard, consisting of a subaltern and suitable number of men over the deposit of Arms and military Stores of the United States at New London , which would be continued until you had made some disposition of those Arms, which...
The sum I have been forc’d to advance on the subject of my last , will force me to draw on you for the portion chargeable to you. This draft will be for 300. dolrs. at ten days sight in favor of Jas. Hooe of alexa.—wh. if you cannot otherwise pay than by a draft on me beg you to make. From this particular item, I mentioned in my last a deduction of 30£ for so much paid to Mr. Kinney by you for...
Be so kind as inform me whether in consequence of our conversation respecting the nominations for command of, and inferior appointments in the army, there is any executive calculation on my conduct. An opposition will probably be made to the Commander, but most certainly if there is in the most distant degree, I shall not join in it, especially as tis possible (as it has been hinted by King...
The embargo passed two days since. […] of some moment in the character […] […]ber of this city was discovered […] had opposed the embargo on fr[iday an]d on monday introduced the proposition himself. It contained a proviso which implied a right that those vessels which had already obtained clearances should be exempt from the operation—but this was amended in the Senate . A vessel of his was...
Jas. Monroe’s best respects to Mr. Jefferson. He has lately been in Orange at Mr. Madisons, from whom he encloses him a letter. At Mr. Ms. he met Mr. Dawson lately from Richmond and who bade him inform Mr. Jefferson that if he takes the stage for Phila. from Fredbg. it will be necessary for him to be in the latter place on tuesday next to arrive in time for the commenc’ment of Congress, as it...
I wrote you lately by Judge Wilson whom I accompanied to the circuit court at Charlottesville. I have since been to the chancery which clos’d as to business of consequence on Saturday. Our child who hath been dangerously ill hath so far recover’d as to admit of her removal home. We sit out thither tomorrow, where I shall remain untill the appeals about the 25th. This will be presented to you...
On my return from Richmond I was favored with yours of the 14. of July. I should have answered it sooner had I not been prevented by some peculair engagements. At present I should be more full upon some points but that the favor of Mr. Madisons company likewise prevents it. Upon one point I think it necessary to say a few words. You suggest that some indiscretions of Mr. Genet have given an...
I believe I mention’d in my last that great part of my time would be occupied in the completion of our report to the Legislature of the revision of the laws. The only act of the Committee at Richmond was to adjourn here which left me the alternative of returning home and bringing Mrs. M. down with me, or abandoning the trust altogether. Mature consideration determined me in favor of the former...
Dr. Barraud who will present you this is a very respectable citizen & able physician of Norfolk. Having been intrusted with the care of the marine hospital at that port, he thinks it incumbent on him to make some communications relative to it to the Executive of the UStates, for which purpose he makes a visit to the seat of govt. you will I am well persuaded find his communication very...
I have inclosed you the papers relative to the British Consul at Norfolk, in the affr. of the man who was sent to the Island and as reported executed, for mutiny on bd. a British ship. In a private letter sometime since I submitted to you a question respecting the mode of correspondence to be observed, between the Executive of the Genl. Govt. and a state, in wh. I gave my opinion freely. I...
Mr. Fauchetts pamphlet was the last communication from you. Mine by Mr. Giles you doubtless have before this. We are here so barren of incident that we have nothing worthy yr. notice. We look to the admn. for the coloring we are to have of European or rather our affrs. with France, and we know enough of the admn. to know that it will be black or white according to circumstances. If for example...
You will have heard that upon the discussion of G.M.’s merits, the foreign business was postponed untill tomorrow, nothing having been done respecting the Hague. The order of proceeding required that a similar question shod. have been taken respecting that court that had been as to the others. But owing I presume to the friends of the gentn. in nomination for it, being in opposition to the...