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I have had the pleasure to receive yours of Octr. 26. and shall not fail to bring with me the articles mentioned in it from Jones the Instrument maker in Holborn. I am much indebted to you that the sum they will cost on an old account so that that matter will rest of course for the present.   I am very thankful to you for the information given me respecting the state of my affrs. in Albemarle....
I have recd. yours of March 30th. with a list of the documents lately submitted to Congress, and the papers sent you from this place. I return to you those latter papers, on a presumption that you have not copies, of them, or rather the originals; if you have they can be of no use to you, & in that case I will thank you to send them back, or that you will send me copies at your leisure. My...
I have been with Mr. R. & have given him no final answer. The fact appears to be that the message to me was directly from the President, so that a decision settles it. He has also had an interview with Mr. Dayton. May I request of you to go to Mr. Randolph, & settle the matter with him. I promised him you wod. in the course of ½ an hour. If it has not the approbation of my few friends &...
On enquiry I found that major Armstead had been regularly appointed principal assessor for our district by the advice of the senate & been furnishd with his commission. It had been intended, as I understood, to appt M r Minor , but the office of Collector , having been disposed of in our county , it was decided on the distributive principle to confer the other office on some person in another...
Mr. Monroe readily consents to an interview with Colo. Hamilton tomorrow at ten in the morning at his lodgings with Mr. Knox in Wall Street. He will bring whom he pleases. AL , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. For background to this letter, see the introductory note to Oliver Wolcott, Jr., to H, July 3, 1797 ; H to Monroe, July 10, 1797 . Thomas Knox, a New York City merchant, lived at 46...
The Secretary of State, to whom was referred the Resolution of the House of Representatives of the 13th inst, requesting the President to lay before the House such documents relative to the Russian mediation, as in his opinion it may not be improper to communicate, has the honor to transmit to the President, for the information of the House, the following letters in relation to that subject...
I find that I omitted to send you a copy of my letter to Genl Jackson, yesterday, as I intended, & therefore, now enclose it. Perhaps I have sent some other paper, in which case be so good as to retain it till we meet. Sincerely yours RC ( DLC ).
M r Lawrance & M r Jones, two young gentlemen of New York, lately presented to me by M r Sandford a Senator from that State, & otherwise highly recommended, intending to visit you and M r Madison, I have taken the liberty to give them this introduction. It is thier object to visit Europe in the Spring & I am satisfied that it will afford them much pleasure, to convey any letters there for you,...
I enclose you several letters on subjects wh. are explained by the parties, better than I can otherwise do. That of our friend La Fayette is no further material than as it mentions his not having recd. the copy of the grant by Congress. You will return it to me when we meet. Respecting those of Mr. Forbes I can only say that I think him a worthy man, very attentive to the enterest of his...
I have receivd yours of the 28th. april, from monticello. The late events in France will doubtless be sensibly felt by most of the powers of Europe, and even by the UStates. I suggested some ideas in my last, growing out of them, for your consideration. With those powers, generally, there is no regard for principle. Every thing is decided, by a prospect of advantage, & renown. I have no doubt...
Permit me to present to yr. acquaintance the bearer Mr. Voss of Culpepper county, a young man of merit, who has expressd a wish of being personally known to you. He is a lawyer by profession, of respectable standing at the bar, and a fair prospect of becoming eminent if he pursues his profession. He intends making a visit this spring to the south, and hearing that it is proposed to adjust the...
At the request of Mr. Arthur Lee of Norfolk I have given him an introduction to you, but not knowing his object, think proper to mention that I do not, as the contrary might otherwise be inferrd. He is in my opinion a young man of merit, tho it is not founded on much acquaintance with him. He deliver’d an oration not long since which was well spoken of, and is a republican. He is however...
The Secretary of State respectfully submits to the President the nominating to the gentleman as vice consul for the Island of St. Thomas. DNA : RG 59—LAR—Letters of Application and Recommendation.
I have not heard from you lately but hope it hath not arisen from ill-health. Two days since we recd. dispatches from Mr. Adams in which he informs us of his demand of the surrender of the posts, & remonstrance agnst the violation of the treaty also in the instance of the negroes, with the answer of the minister to his memorial. In this answer it is stated that the King admits a violation in...
Since writing the letter—inclosd, to Mrs. Adams, I have conferr’d with the President on the subject of your sons return, and am authorised to state to you, that in case of peace with G Britain, the mission to London will be offer’d to him. The conduct of your son, it gives me pleasure to state, has obtaind the entire approbation of the President.—It is hoped that it will suit his convenience...
I am too recently on this theatre to give you any information of the state of public affairs which you will not obtain of the Gazettes, wh. I shall therefore not repeat. It will be more useful to go back to the transactions in which I have been lately engaged, and to communicate some incidents which occurrd in them, with which you are not yet acquainted. The pressure of business at the time,...
I send you herewith the principal documents which have been printed since the commencment of the Session. Should any be omitted, or should there be any information on any point not touched by them, which you may desire, or [ sic ] being so advised, I will communicate it. The Missouri question, as it is call’d, still engages the attention of Congress, & will probably do it, much longer. The...
General King of the district of Maine in Massachusetts, being desirous, of making you a visit, I take much pleasure in promoting his wishes by giving him this introduction to you. His steady & firm attachment to the principles of our govt., & support of it, in the late war, by very meritorious services, are known to you. I hope that you derive no inconvenience from this severe attack of cold...
Captn. Dulton having occasion for money in the UStates with a view to his accomodation I have given him a draft on you for the amt. here, for my expences <per? > for the sum of sixteen hundred sixty dolls. 14. cents. I send you a letter from the Chevalr. Frere containing some offcl. papers relative to his recall. He is a worthy man a friend of the UStates. He feels some sensibility to the...
Permit me to present to your acquaintance Mr Owen, who proposes to make a visit to you & Mr Jefferson. Of his character for benevolence & useful improv’ments I need say nothing to you. With sincere regard dear Sir yours RC ( DLC ).
The Undersigned acting as Secretary of State to whom was referred the Resolution of the Senate, requesting the President to cause to be laid before the Senate such information in his possession, respecting the existing state of the Relations between the United States and the Continental powers of Europe as he may deem not improper to be communicated, has the honor to report: That the Relations...
It is hinted to me by a person lately from London that it was said there I presume by King or Gore or both that Fulton had mentioned me in some correspondence hence to the United States perhaps with Governor Blount as being friendly to their interest, and which has got into Timothy’s hands and is considered by that enlightened statesman & his friends as a proof [of] a conspiracy—when this man...
The late session, considering the flourishing & happy condition of the country, has been unusually oppressive on every branch of the Executive dept. There have been more calls for information, than I recollect to have been made at any former session, and in some instances, with a portion of the H. of R. a very querulous spirit has been manifested. The questions, involving the right in...
I attended on the 15. according to appointment at Richmd. to meet the gentn., my associates, in the revision of the laws, on that business, but found only Mr. Nelson there. Mr. Lee & Mr. Tucker came abt. the 20th. but predisposed not to enter on it at that place. Three days were taken up in occasional consultations about an adjournment to Wmsburg wh. was advocated by the two latter & but...
Finding that my arrangments in Loudoun might be completed on the day I arriv’d there, I came down on the following day, monday. Altho the upper road is bad, I still think it will be found better than either of the others. Some letters are recd. from Mr Crawford, the most important of wh. are in cypher. They shall be forwarded without delay we have nothing from our comrs. Chauncey’s fate is...
The unfavorable state of the weather since my arrival here, has kept me so much confind, that I have been unable, to pay, that attention to my affairs, that I should otherwise have done. I shall however be with you in the course of the insuing week. I send you a letter from Judge Nelson, & two from Mr. Appleton, which give the latest accounts, from them, of affairs in Spain. I send you also,...
I have just heard it stated here that the suspension of the payments to France was in the first instance by Mr. Short before the commencement of Mr. Morris’s service and without orders from this place and that the latter only conformed to a rule shewn him, implicating strongly that there never had been any direction from this quarter on the subject. This statement was given by Cabot upon an...
§ From James Monroe. 8 November 1814, War Department. “I have the honor respectfully to submit for your approbation the following list of appointments in the Army of the United States. “I have also to request that the enclosed list of promotions may be substituted for the list of promotions in the Light Artillery and Riflemen now before the Senate, and that the name of Garret E. Pendergrast...
An accident lately occurr’d which has given me great concern. The inclosed letter was received, with many others, several from your son at St Petersburg, & laid before me in the dept. of State. I opend it, without looking at the Superscription. On reading a line or two, I perceived the error I had committed, & searching for the address found the envelopes of two letters, one addressed to you,...
I have not yet receiv’d an answer from Mr Crowninshield, respecting the Labrador coast, or the Algerine letter. The letter to Mr Harris, will be ready for Mr Coles whenever he arrives. It being pretty much a legal subject, I have availd myself of the aid of Mr Rush in preparing the dispatch. Mr Homans says that a corvette is prepard to take him, & that the cost will be inconsiderable, she...
I have lately heard with much pleasure of your return in good health to monticello, to which place, I address, this letter. The papers relating to mr dodge partner of the late mr Cathalan, were reciev’d & deposited in the dep t of State. Altho’ no promise was made to him, relation to the office, application to the present time, yet being there, in the discharge of its duties, under the...
I had the pleasure some weeks past to receive your favor of the 25. of June and should have answered it sooner, had any safe private opportunity offered for Bordeaux from whence vessels most frequently sail for America. I called the evening after its receit on Mr Morris, & put your letter for him into his hands so that he recd it unopened. He left this about the beginng of octr for...
I have recd. yr. favor of the 27. of Novr. in answer to mine of the 15th. My last gave you the state of the representations here. The business of importance is still before committees or if reported not yet acted on. It seems to be the Genl. sense of Congress to appoint a minister to the Ct: of London & to give him instructions upon many subjects & particularly those wh. arise in the conduct...
I have yours of 21. ulto. and very sincerely thank you for the interest you take in what concerns my welfare, of which indeed I have heretofore had so many proofs as long since to have ceased to make acknowledgments. The cause of irritation to wh. you allude is indeed a serious one, considering the station from whence it emanated: considering the person, only an object of contempt. I had seen...
Mr. Livingston intimated to me some time since, his desire to hold with you and Mr. Jefferson, the same relation which he held in 1798., & that I would communicate that sentiment to you on his part, & apprize him of the result. I think that I informd you that Mr Conway had been appointed to a land office in Alabama. Having communicated to Mr. Jefferson, the views taken in the admn., respecting...
I receivd with great pleasure your favor of the 29 of march, with a copy of one which you had sent to our friend mr Short, and should not be surpris.d, if the prediction containd in this letter, should be verified, by a rapid succession of events, proceeding from the mov’ment of the french government lately announced in the Speech of the King. when it is recollected that he, his whole family,...
Altho’ it is not yet decided whether I shall sail this fall or not to the UStates, as I most earnestly wish to do, yet I cannot neglect the opportunity by Col: Mercer, to add something to you which it is possible may not be in any other letters. It was my intention as I intimated by Captn. Dulton, to sail immediately after my arrival here, & nothing wod. have prevented it but the seizure of...
Some very interesting domestick concerns which could not well be postponed, seconded by the state of the wound on my leg, prevented my having the pleasure of waiting on you in the last week, but I shall be with you to morrow if no accident presents an obstacle to it. I shall bring all the papers with me which it will be necessary to submit to your view at this time. Indeed many things have...
Mr Lawrance & Mr Jones of New York, young gentlemen of merit, well connected there, expressing a wish to visit you & Mr Jefferson, I have felt it due to the introduction they have presented me, to make them known to you. They intend to visit Europe in the Spring, & will I am satisfied, take much interest in bearing any letters from you, or being in any respect useful to you. With great respect...
I have nothing from you to day. Col Cass has arrivd & gives the same acct. heretofore recd. from others of the surrender of Detroit. Genl Cushing thinks that a power to grant a volunteer comn., to give effect to the law, is a necessary construction of it. I shall, unless some other view be taken in the course of the day, accept such a comn. & set out in discharge of it, in a few days. A short...
Mr Owen intending from motives of respect to pay to you & Mr Madison, a visit, has requested of me a letter of introduction to you, with which I readily comply. His character for benevolence, & improvement in certain branches of industry is I doubt not, well known to you. He indulges a strong hope that the good effect of his system, may be sensibly felt, in improving the condition of mankind....
Soon after my last I requested an interview with Lord Hawkesbury which took place on the 2d instant, in which I informed him, that I had received your instructions to propose to his government, the regulation by Convention, of certain points which I was persuaded both countries would find their advantage in placing on explicit and equitable ground. I stated to his Lordship the concerns it was...
As I shall write you a publick letter soon I take occasion to observe in this that the material changes in the ministry, are Mr. Pitt in the room of Mr. Addington, Ld. Harrowby in that of Ld. Hawkesbury who has taken that of Mr. Yorke retired; Ld. Melville at the head of the admiralty instead of Ld. St. Vincent. The Grenvilles & Wyndham refused to enter the ministry without Mr. Fox, who it is...
Upon my arrival here I wrote you and committed my letter to the care of the secretary of Congress who said he would transmit it thro Mr. Morris. I hope you have received it. It gives you a concise account of my late rout to the lakes &c. as well as some observations which I thought worthy your attention in the formation of a commercial treaty with Great Britain respecting Canada . It was late...
Being under the necessity of explaining the motives of my conduct upon my arrival, to the Executive, & in consequence of presenting a statmt. of the circumstances under which I acted, I have thought I could not better convey my ideas to you on that head than by enclosing a copy of the paper. This will of course be kept from Mr. R. because of his official station, & all others from whom it...
I have within a few days past received yours of Febry. 26th. by the French consul, the only one since June last. That spoken of from Mr. Jones has not come to hand. I informed you sometime since that this government had taken up the treaty with a high tone ( our treaty with England ) appointed forthwith an envoy extra. to repair to the United States and with instructions in case he did not...
My letter of the 8th, and to which I was on the succeeding day honored with a reply, was written in the belief that great exertions were made to convince you that it was the general wish of the community Colo. Hamilton should be appointed Envoy extra[ordinar]y to G. Britain upon the present occasion. As I knew that this was not the case, but on the contrary was persuaded that a great majority...
I wrote you on the 26th. ulto a private letter which was sent with my publick one of the day before by Liverpool, respecting some objections wh. had been made to me by some friends to the arrangment abt. our citizens creditors of France in the late treaties with that power. I promised you in that letter one to some friends, open to be delivered or withheld as you thought fit, explanatory of...
I wrote you two days since by my servant who was to put the letter in the post office at charlottesville. This will be presented by Mr. Ervin a young man of merit from Boston. I saw him in Paris, but on some ground wh. I forget refused him my passport, in consequence whereof we did not become acquaint⟨ed. He pub⟩lished my book in Engld., of which he sent me a copy. Last winter he was...
I have addressed to your care a letter for Mr. R. & two others, to be addressed by you according to circumstances either to Langdon, Burr, Butler, Ross or any other person in case you shod. deem it proper to be presented at all & sent them in a packet by Havre. This which covers one for Mr. R. is to go by Bordeaux. I submit it entirely to you either to present or suppress it as the state of...