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I have lately received your favors of the 2d. and 21. of March last and by which I find, to my surprise, that only two letters from me and those of the last year had reached you, tho’ I had written one more of the last year and two of the present one. Frouillé as I informed you in one of these was one of the victims of the reign of terror; Dr. Jemm is living and much gratified to find he has a...
In the proceedings of Congress there is little interesting as yet. Some question will probably be brought forward respecting the affrs. of the Spanish colonies, in some form, with intention to bring into discussion, the conduct of the government towards them, thro’ the whole of their contest with Spain, & more particularly within the last year. The recognition of Buenos Ayres, as an indept...
I have the pleasure to inclose to you a report of a the com: of the. 7th. on our for: relations with govts. in which the communications wh took place between the Ex: of the US. & the Br. govt., are review’d, & the a project of an act of congress, relative to seamen submitted to considerations—The object of the report seems to be and as it undoubtdly is, to place the controversy between the two...
I quartered last night near charlotte Hall, and took a view this morning at 8 oClock, from a commanding height, below Benedict Creek, of all the enemy’s shipping near the town and down the river, to the distance at least, of 8 or 10 miles. I counted 23 Square rigged vessels. Few others were to be seen, and very few barges. I inferred from the latter circumstance that the enemy had moved up the...
I lately receiv’d the inclosed, from a gentleman residing in Bladensburg, who applies, for the professorship, held by Mr Long, in case he should accept that, wh. it is reported, has been offered to him, in the University of London. I have inform’d him, in reply to his letter, that I did not know, that the offer had been made to Mr Long, or if made, that he would accept it, but that I should...
The inclosed was left with me by M r Rush , for your opinion, of the propriety of the measure proposed. I retaind it, in the hope of finding you alone, before we separated, for a moments conversation on the subject. The first question is, whether such a notice of the occurrence, which it is proposed to commemorate, is proper, or silent contempt, will be, more expressive, & dignified? You will...
I have the pleasure to inform you that the Senate has confirmd the nomination of Mr. Conway, to a land office in Alabama, as valuable in point of profit, as I am assur’d, tho’ not that, for which you recommended him. Of this be so good as to inform Mr Catlet Conway your neighbour. The vacancy at Petersbg. gave me great embarrassment, as to the person, to be selected for it. Dr. Field had...
I have yours of the 23d. ulto. by Fredbg. We had hear⟨d⟩ of yr. indisposition and inferrd from yr. not mentioning ⟨it⟩ it had been slight, and were happy to learn from Mr. Maco⟨n⟩ that altho’ it was more serious than we supposed, you h⟨ad⟩ recovered entirely yr. health. Every ⟨an⟩ticipati⟨on⟩ of th⟨e⟩ views of the admn. in this State seems to have been verified, or so many facts established as...
I have yours of the 22d. ulto., communicating the purport of a letter to you, from H. Lee, at Nashville, of Augt. 24. with an extract from him, of a letter to him from Genl. Armstrong, respecting his provisional order to Genl. Jackson, of July 18. 1814., to take possession of Pensacola, on certain conditions, as to the presum’d cause, of the delay, in the transmission of that letter, and the...
The enclosed from Mr Rush, will give you a view of our present relations with England. Retain them till we meet, which I expect will be next week. The meeting of the visitors, is to be, I understand, then, in which, we shall expect to see you, if not we shall have the pleasure of se[e]ing you at your own house as we go to Washington, which we propose doing next week. We hope that you are all...
I have had the pleasure to receive yours of Octr. 26. and shall not fail to bring with me the articles mentioned in it from Jones the Instrument maker in Holborn. I am much indebted to you that the sum they will cost on an old account so that that matter will rest of course for the present.   I am very thankful to you for the information given me respecting the state of my affrs. in Albemarle....
I have recd. yours of March 30th. with a list of the documents lately submitted to Congress, and the papers sent you from this place. I return to you those latter papers, on a presumption that you have not copies, of them, or rather the originals; if you have they can be of no use to you, & in that case I will thank you to send them back, or that you will send me copies at your leisure. My...
I have been with Mr. R. & have given him no final answer. The fact appears to be that the message to me was directly from the President, so that a decision settles it. He has also had an interview with Mr. Dayton. May I request of you to go to Mr. Randolph, & settle the matter with him. I promised him you wod. in the course of ½ an hour. If it has not the approbation of my few friends &...
On enquiry I found that major Armstead had been regularly appointed principal assessor for our district by the advice of the senate & been furnishd with his commission. It had been intended, as I understood, to appt M r Minor , but the office of Collector , having been disposed of in our county , it was decided on the distributive principle to confer the other office on some person in another...
Mr. Monroe readily consents to an interview with Colo. Hamilton tomorrow at ten in the morning at his lodgings with Mr. Knox in Wall Street. He will bring whom he pleases. AL , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. For background to this letter, see the introductory note to Oliver Wolcott, Jr., to H, July 3, 1797 ; H to Monroe, July 10, 1797 . Thomas Knox, a New York City merchant, lived at 46...
The Secretary of State, to whom was referred the Resolution of the House of Representatives of the 13th inst, requesting the President to lay before the House such documents relative to the Russian mediation, as in his opinion it may not be improper to communicate, has the honor to transmit to the President, for the information of the House, the following letters in relation to that subject...
I find that I omitted to send you a copy of my letter to Genl Jackson, yesterday, as I intended, & therefore, now enclose it. Perhaps I have sent some other paper, in which case be so good as to retain it till we meet. Sincerely yours RC ( DLC ).
M r Lawrance & M r Jones, two young gentlemen of New York, lately presented to me by M r Sandford a Senator from that State, & otherwise highly recommended, intending to visit you and M r Madison, I have taken the liberty to give them this introduction. It is thier object to visit Europe in the Spring & I am satisfied that it will afford them much pleasure, to convey any letters there for you,...
I enclose you several letters on subjects wh. are explained by the parties, better than I can otherwise do. That of our friend La Fayette is no further material than as it mentions his not having recd. the copy of the grant by Congress. You will return it to me when we meet. Respecting those of Mr. Forbes I can only say that I think him a worthy man, very attentive to the enterest of his...
I have receivd yours of the 28th. april, from monticello. The late events in France will doubtless be sensibly felt by most of the powers of Europe, and even by the UStates. I suggested some ideas in my last, growing out of them, for your consideration. With those powers, generally, there is no regard for principle. Every thing is decided, by a prospect of advantage, & renown. I have no doubt...
Permit me to present to yr. acquaintance the bearer Mr. Voss of Culpepper county, a young man of merit, who has expressd a wish of being personally known to you. He is a lawyer by profession, of respectable standing at the bar, and a fair prospect of becoming eminent if he pursues his profession. He intends making a visit this spring to the south, and hearing that it is proposed to adjust the...
At the request of Mr. Arthur Lee of Norfolk I have given him an introduction to you, but not knowing his object, think proper to mention that I do not, as the contrary might otherwise be inferrd. He is in my opinion a young man of merit, tho it is not founded on much acquaintance with him. He deliver’d an oration not long since which was well spoken of, and is a republican. He is however...
The Secretary of State respectfully submits to the President the nominating to the gentleman as vice consul for the Island of St. Thomas. DNA : RG 59—LAR—Letters of Application and Recommendation.
I have not heard from you lately but hope it hath not arisen from ill-health. Two days since we recd. dispatches from Mr. Adams in which he informs us of his demand of the surrender of the posts, & remonstrance agnst the violation of the treaty also in the instance of the negroes, with the answer of the minister to his memorial. In this answer it is stated that the King admits a violation in...
Since writing the letter—inclosd, to Mrs. Adams, I have conferr’d with the President on the subject of your sons return, and am authorised to state to you, that in case of peace with G Britain, the mission to London will be offer’d to him. The conduct of your son, it gives me pleasure to state, has obtaind the entire approbation of the President.—It is hoped that it will suit his convenience...
I am too recently on this theatre to give you any information of the state of public affairs which you will not obtain of the Gazettes, wh. I shall therefore not repeat. It will be more useful to go back to the transactions in which I have been lately engaged, and to communicate some incidents which occurrd in them, with which you are not yet acquainted. The pressure of business at the time,...
I send you herewith the principal documents which have been printed since the commencment of the Session. Should any be omitted, or should there be any information on any point not touched by them, which you may desire, or [ sic ] being so advised, I will communicate it. The Missouri question, as it is call’d, still engages the attention of Congress, & will probably do it, much longer. The...
General King of the district of Maine in Massachusetts, being desirous, of making you a visit, I take much pleasure in promoting his wishes by giving him this introduction to you. His steady & firm attachment to the principles of our govt., & support of it, in the late war, by very meritorious services, are known to you. I hope that you derive no inconvenience from this severe attack of cold...
Captn. Dulton having occasion for money in the UStates with a view to his accomodation I have given him a draft on you for the amt. here, for my expences <per? > for the sum of sixteen hundred sixty dolls. 14. cents. I send you a letter from the Chevalr. Frere containing some offcl. papers relative to his recall. He is a worthy man a friend of the UStates. He feels some sensibility to the...
Permit me to present to your acquaintance Mr Owen, who proposes to make a visit to you & Mr Jefferson. Of his character for benevolence & useful improv’ments I need say nothing to you. With sincere regard dear Sir yours RC ( DLC ).