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I shall not be able to get from this place so soon as I expected. You well know how much is to be attended to at such a time preparatory to my departure from the city. I send you a copy of my letter to Genl Jackson, which will unfold to you, our views on the whole subject. I wish you to shew this paper, & the Russian document to Mr Jefferson, in confidence, when you see him. Your friend RC (...
Since my last but little hath been done in Congress. We have had generally no more than 7. States present. The only time that 9. were their time was employd upon the subject of the Connecticut cession, which ultimately was accepted; whereby she cedes all the land lying westward of a line to be drawn westward of the Pena. line parallel with the same. Our State voted against it but were in...
I avail myself of the opportunity afforded by Mr. Biddle to communicate to you a copy of a correspondence, and the substance of a conference, between Mr. Canning and myself relative to the late aggression on the peace and sovereignty of the U. States, by the British Ship Leopard in an attack on the Chesapeak frigate off the Capes of Virginia. Mr. Canning’s private letter of July 25. which gave...
Upon not receiving any answer to my first information and observing the enimy inclining toward your right I thought it adviseable to hang as close on them as possible—I am at present within four hundred yrds of their right—I have only about 70 men who are now fatigued much—I have taken three prisoners—If I had six horsemen I think If I co[ul]d serve you in no other way I shod in the course of...
Letter not found. 28 April 1786. Mentioned in JM’s letter to Monroe, 13 May 1786 , and Monroe’s letter to JM, 18 May 1786 . Related to the speculation in which Monroe purchased land in the Mohawk Valley for JM and himself. Monroe expressed an interest in taking a journey with JM to see the lands, and discussed odd appearance of two conventions sitting simultaneously with similar powers to...
I was yesterday favored with yours of the 4th. of Decr. the only one yet recd. I had perfectly an[ti]cipated the secret causes & motives of the western business, and was extremely happy to find that the patriotism of the people in every quarter, left to its own voluntary impulse and without any information that was calculated to stimulate it, was sufficient to triumph over the schemes of...
I enclose a copy of the journals so far as they are printed. They contain nothing you will find respecting the requisition nor the commercial interests of the Union. The former upon the report of a committee hath been frequently before Congress of late and as often recommitted, in which state it now lies. As the principal part of the debt which in other States forms a part of the present...
I received a note from Lord Harrowby on the 3d. instant requesting me to call on him at his office the next day, which I did. His Lordship asked me in what light was our treaty viewed by our goverment. I replied that it had been ratified with the exception of the 5th. Art:, as I had informed him on a former occasion. He observed that he meant the treaty of 1794, which by one of its...
My publick letter of the 8th shew’d the state of affrs. here, since which nothing has occurr’d to change it, having recd. no reply from Lord Harrowby. As I inferr’d from what passed in the interview, that the cabinet was yet to deliberate on the whole subject, and of course that it had never acted on it before or even heard of it, for Lord Harrowby told me that by some casualty the project...
My St. Croix friends have mentioned that it might reach you, that a Mr. Durant would be more acceptable there as Mr. Yards successor than any other person. The enclosed letter respects the pretensions of another Gentleman for another place and which I have thought expedient to submit to your inspection. Sincerely I am yr. affectionate friend & servt RC ( DLC ); endorsed by TJ as received 2...
[In the letterpress edition this letter was erroneously identified as being from James Monroe to George Washington.] May I take the liberty of our former acquaintance to confer with you freely upon the following propositions—You seem’d satisfied with those presented to the view of Congress on friday by Colo. Grayson viz. that exports be admitted down the Missisippi to N. Orleans as an entrepot...
I arrived on saturday so much fatigued that I found it was impossible to proceed by the route of Albemarle & Loudon back to Washington. A slight injury wh. I recd. in descending from the stage made the exn. of that project the more inexpedient. I therefore sent up for Major Jas. Lewis in whose hands I propose to leave my affrs. to come down; I expect him to morrow, and hope to adjust them so...
I have receivd yours of the 12th. Since my return home I have recover’d daily from the debilitating effect of my late indisposition, so that I have reason to presume on a thorough restoration in a short time, if circumstances shod. allow me to remain here. I feel however uneasy lest something shod. occur in which my absence might be improper. I am surprised that we hear nothing from our...
My last to you was of the 4th. by original and duplicate, to the care of Mr. Jarvis at Lisbon. Since Captain Dultons return we have done every thing in our power to conclude the negotiation by a treaty in case one could be obtained, or without it, if not to be had. The great delay of the Minister to send us an answer on the Western limits, induced us to enquire whether he meant to give one, or...
Mrs Douglas, with two of her daughters, having intimated their intention to visit Virginia, & to take Richmond, & some of the upper counties, including orange in their route, I have taken the liberty to give them this introduction to yours & Mrs Madisons acquaintance. They are of New York, & well respected there, & my nephew Lt Monroe having married one of her daughters, excite a strong motive...
I think I mentioned to you sometime since that Mr. Paine was with me. Upon my arrival I found him in prison, & as soon as I saw my application in his behalf would be attended to, I asked his release & obtained it. But he was in extreme ill health, without resource, & (affrs. being unsettled) not without apprehensions of personal danger, & therefore anxious to avail himself as much as possible...
We have had no rain since my arrival here, nor had there been any for some time before. The most discouraging prospect for corn exists, which added to a defective crop of small grain, menaces us with almost a famine. I am glad to hear that the Neptune has enterd the Delaware. Of the Passengers we shall be better informd tomorrow. I send every paper back to the depts. lately receivd except that...
I have not yet presented a note to this govt. respecting the impressment of our seamen, as I intimated to you in my last I shod. do. Mr. Erving is very attentive to the object, who most probably obtains every thing that can be expected on it at this time. I am persuaded that at no former period had we so little cause of complaint for injuries under this practice. Some however have occurr’d...
Major Thompson belongd to a Penna. brigade in the revolutionary war, when I knew him. He was I think a subaltern. I have seen him often, since I came here, & apparently in indigent circumstances. I have always thought well of him, without any minute knowledge of him. DNA : RG 59—ML—Miscellaneous Letters.
Your favor of the 9th. reach’d me a few days since. Mine by the last post advis’d you of my arrival here; still I am with out a colleague and the representation of the States, the same. I am perfectly satisfied that the more fully the subject is investigated, and the better the interests of the States severally are understood, the more obvious will appear the necessity of commiting to the U S....
I recd. on saturday yr. letters of the first inst. wh. were put in the mail on that day, with a copy of the laws of the UStates, and I recd. this morning my instructions, with the letters to our ministers abroad and other documents that were forwarded with them. The ship had clear’d at the custom house on saturday, my baggage was on board, and every preparatory measure was taken for sailing...
As you will be on the ground or convenient to it for negotiating further engagments on the Mohawk as well as concluding that we have already enter’d into, I commit to you the papers respecting it. You will take such steps as you find necessary in both instances. We hope to see you if convenient on your way to N. York. Let me hear from you in the mean time whilst you remain where you are....
The Secretary of State, to whom was referred the resolution of the House of Representatives, requesting the President to cause to be laid before that House information relative to the duties laid on articles imported from the United States into the British provinces of Canada, Nova Scotia, and New Brunswick; relative to the duties on articles exported to the United States from the said...
Our last to you was of the first instt. which was sent by original & duplicate by Bordeaux, in which you had copies of our correspondence with Mr. Cevallos to the 28 ulto. Since then we have discussed the question relative to W. Florida, in his last note on which point is a passage relative to France of which I enclose you an extract. Having in our note to him of the 26th. ulto. stated that...
I have recd. yr. communications by Mr. Baring, & shall write you in reply by Mr. Smith who sails the day after tomorrow (son of Genl. Smith) to New York. I shall avail myself of the same opportunity to write the President an acknowledgment of his. The object of this is to make known to you the bearer, a Mr. Herries, who visits our country with a view to make an establishment in the western or...
I have already forwarded you copies of two letters to Ld Mulgrave respecting the late seizure of American vessels, and you will receive with this a Copy of a third one. His Lordship has endeavourd to manage this business without writing, from a desire which has been very apparent to get rid of it, without any compromitment. With that view he gave me in an early interview, a report of the...
Your letter of the 13. ult o found me at the Shannondale spring, to which I had carried my family on account of the indisposition of M rs Monroe & of our little g d child the daughter of M r Gouverneur. The duties which I had to perform, in this distressing occurrence, which terminated the day before yesterday, in the death of the infant, superadded to those of the office I hold, prevented my...
Mr Serurier presented to me yesterday a copy of his letter of credence from the Emperor reappointing him Minister to the ustates. He read me at the same time the letter accompanying it from the minister of his govt., by which he was instructed to state that his govt. was resolvd to cultivate the most friendly relations with the UStates: that in case they engaged in war, they would respect our...
I have this moment recd. yr favor of sepr. 24. the only one for a great length of time. You will find by mine forwarded by Col: Mercer & subsequent letters how the business stands, on which you touch, with this govt. Lord Mulgrave has given no answer to my letters, nor have I heard anything of late from him, or indeed since the short one to that notifying my intention to sail to the UStates by...
I enclosed you today from the council chamber a copy of my correspondence with the bankers relative to the 120,000 dolrs. remitted by the late Secry of the Treasury to me at Paris for them, intending to write you fully this afternoon on that & some other subjects, but am prevented by compy. I have the original letters of the bankers, and other papers referr’d to in that correspondence, which I...