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I send you the papers which I mentioned to you yesterday, that is, the letter of L t Lewis, & the opinion of the court of Enquiry, on the charges alledged against Commodore Barron, which, after perrusing, be so kind as to return to me. A letter from M r Thompson is also enclosed. I shall set out to morrow, it appearing necessary, by the communications from Washington, that I should either be...
Your letter of the 13. ult o found me at the Shannondale spring, to which I had carried my family on account of the indisposition of M rs Monroe & of our little g d child the daughter of M r Gouverneur. The duties which I had to perform, in this distressing occurrence, which terminated the day before yesterday, in the death of the infant, superadded to those of the office I hold, prevented my...
Had I receiv’d your letter respecting Mr. Robt. Taylor, before the appointment of General Pegram to the office of marshall was made, I would not have hesitated to appoint Mr Taylor. But I knew nothing of his wish on the subject, & being appriz’d by the person who sent forward the resignation of General Moore, that an immediate appointment of his successor, would be necessary, as judge Tucker...
I find, on conferring with the Secretary of the Treasury, that it will proper for me to appoint a naval officer for the customs at Pensacola, and to allow him one thousand dolrs. pr. annm. salary, with the other emoluments incident to the trust. If you are willing to accept the appointment, I will confer it on you, & will direct the commission to be issued immediately. A sloop of war will sail...
The whole amount of claims of the state of Virg a , against the UStates, which has been presented, is not more than 50,000 dol rs , of which 11.000 have been suspended a long time, for the want of satisfactory explanation, which it is apprehended cannot be given. The residue of the claims, that is, of the claims exceeding that sum, have been presented by the agent of the State, M r C. Selden,...
My absence from this city on a visit to my farm in Loudoun, prevented an earlier attention to your letter of the 8 th , respecting the fund appropriated by the gen l assembly at its last session, for the use of the university, expected to be deriv’d from the settlement of the claims of the state, on the general government. I now enclose you a report on that subject, from the secretary of war,...
Since I have been in this office many newspapers have been sent to me, from every part of the union, unsought, which, having neither time nor curiosity to read, are in effect thrown away. I should have stopped the practice, but from delicacy to the Editors, & expecting also, that they would subject me to no charge. Lately I have been informed that the same practice took place in your time, &...
I regret to have to inform you of the death of Mr Wm. Burwell which took place on yesterday, after a long illness. He was a virtuous man & good member. The treaty with spain has been ratified unconditionally by her govt., & the grants annulld in the instrument of ratification. It is now before the Senate on the question whether it shall be accepted, the time stipulated for the ratification...
I regret to have to reform you of the death of mr W. Burwell which took place on yesterday, after a long & distressing illness. all possible care was taken of him. He was a most virtuous man & estimable member of the H. of Rep s . The treaty with Spain has been ratified by her gov t , unconditionally, & the grants annulled in the instrament of ratification. It is before the Senate, on the...
Mr Lawrance & Mr Jones of New York, young gentlemen of merit, well connected there, expressing a wish to visit you & Mr Jefferson, I have felt it due to the introduction they have presented me, to make them known to you. They intend to visit Europe in the Spring, & will I am satisfied, take much interest in bearing any letters from you, or being in any respect useful to you. With great respect...
M r Lawrance & M r Jones, two young gentlemen of New York, lately presented to me by M r Sandford a Senator from that State, & otherwise highly recommended, intending to visit you and M r Madison, I have taken the liberty to give them this introduction. It is thier object to visit Europe in the Spring & I am satisfied that it will afford them much pleasure, to convey any letters there for you,...
The question as to the admission of Missouri into the union, which is still depending, will probably not be decided untill after the holydays, & the decision is then quite uncertain. You have I presume seen a proposition of Dr Eustis, for admitting her, after a certain day, provided, in the interim, the obnoxious clause in her constitution shall be stricken out. Should this fail, it is...
We have just receivd a letter from Mr Rush of the 20th of october, communicating one from the Spanish ambassador in London to him, of the preceding date, stating that he had been informd confidentially that the Florida treaty had been ratified. It does not appear that the information had been imparted to him, from Madrid or London or by whom. It being possible that it might have been receivd...
You will receive by this mail a copy of the message in which I have endeavourd, to place our institutions in a just light, comparatively with those of Europe, without looking at the latter, or even glancing at them by any remark. The state of our finances is I presume more favorable, than was generally supposd. It seems probable that it will improve in future, the quantity of goods which...
You will receive herewith a copy of the message, in which I have endeavored without looking at the old governments of Europe, to place our own, in such prominent circumstances, as seemed to require attention from me, at this time, in such a light, as to shew a striking contrast between them. The amount of the debt paid off since the war, is, I presume, greater than has been generally supposed,...
¶From James Monroe. Letter not found. 22 September 1820 . Offered for sale in The Collection of Autographs of Hon. James T. Mitchell (Stan. V. Henkels Catalogue No. 731 [1894], 77).
I return you the extract which you were so kind as to give me the perusal of, with an assurance of my thorough conviction that it cannot fail to have a good effect. The sentiments expressd in favor of an american interest & policy, extended in the first instance to the preservation of order, along our coast, & in our seas, in sound, and will in all probability ripen into a system, at no...
A man of whom I heard you speak lately, as a gardener, to whom you had rented some land below me, called with M r Price, some days since, to rent, a piece of my land, on my saw mill stream. Finding that he was the person of whom you spoke, I observ’d that unless, I knew, that you consider’d him at liberty, to treat with another, I could have nothing to say to him He promised to produce that...
In addition to mr Gallatin’s & mr Rush’s letters which I promised last night to send you to day, I inclose a copy of the instructions given to mr Forbes appointed agent to S o America, either Buenos Ayres, or Chili, to be decided, by a circumstance mentiond in them. as they explain in a general way, and relations with that country, and state some facts of an interesting nature, I have thought...
I have receiv’d your letter of the 14. containing a very interesting view of the late treaty with Spain, and of the proceedings respecting it here. If the occurrence involvd in it nothing more, than a question between the UStates & Spain, or between them & the Colonies, I should entirely concur in your view of the subject. I am satisfied, that we might, regulate it, in every circumstance, as...
Our troubles with Spain are not ended, nor is it possible to say when they will be. It was hoped and presumed that this minister would have been authorisd to settle every difficulty, but it appears that he came, simply, to ask explanations, and report those given to his government, to amuse, and procrastinate as his predecessor had done. He admits that he is personally satisfied, as to the...
We are still destind to have further trouble with Spain. It was hoped, that the minister lately arrived, would have terminated every difficulty, but it appears that he has come to act the part of his predecessor,—to make complaints, demand explanations & report them to his government, who may take as many years to conclude another treaty, as they did the last. This minister admits, that there...
I have the pleasure to forward to you by the mail of this day, a copy of the journal of the convention, which form’d the constitution of the U States. Congress having appropriated a copy for you, one for Mr. Jefferson, and another for Mr. Madison, I have chargd myself with the execution, of so much of the resolution, as relates to each of you. This instrument–having secur’d to us and to our...
I send you by this days mail a copy of the journal of the convention which formd the fedl. constitution. One is allowed by the act of Congress to yourself, to Mr Jefferson & to Mr Adams. Several votes were taken yesterday in the Senate on different propositions, respecting the Missouri question, & it appears that one was adopted by a majority of 4. for the establishment of a line to commence...
I forward to you by this days mail a copy of the Journal of the Convention which formd the constitution of the UStates. By the act of congress providing for the distribution of them, one is allowd to you, & likewise to Mr Madison & to Mr Adams. The Intelligencer will communicate to you some account of the proceedings of congress on the Missouri question, & particularly of the late votes taken...
Major General Brown, who commands the northern division of our army, will have the pleasure to deliver you this letter. He visits Virg a for the purpose, of manifesting his respect & regard for yourself & M r Madison & I gave him this introduction to you at his request. His gallant conduct on the Niagara frontier, in the last war, and his meritorious services, thro’ the whole war, in other...
I send you by this days mail, the documents of greatest interest, which have been presented to Congress during the present session. on our concerns with Spain we have nothing new, & little reason to expect a minister here from that country, during the session, mr Vives, said to have been appointed some months ago, being under quarantine, within a few leagues of Madrid, in consequence of...
I send you herewith the principal documents which have been printed since the commencment of the Session. Should any be omitted, or should there be any information on any point not touched by them, which you may desire, or [ sic ] being so advised, I will communicate it. The Missouri question, as it is call’d, still engages the attention of Congress, & will probably do it, much longer. The...
I intended on my late visit to albemarle, to have communicated freely with you, on the subject of internal improvement, in reference to the power of the gen l government, especially as to the appropriation of the public money, but circumstances were unfavorable then, to such a communication. my object has been, rather to state certain facts & considerations, which I was compelled to advert to,...
I send you a copy of the message which has just been sent in to Congress. The affair with Spain has been plac’d on the best ground, that great consideration had suggested, and we hope that it may be managed, in a manner, to secure the object desir’d, without war. I have reason to think, that the efforts of several powers, will be exerted, on that side; those of France, certainly will be; and...
I receivd your kind letter, with the information, respecting my acct., with the estate of our late friend Mr. Jones, the day after my meeting with the Commissrs.; but they admitted the item on a view of the passage in Mr Yards letter relating to it, & my assurance, that I would withdraw it, if it should not be supported by you. Your letter will be very satisfactory to them, without even a copy...
I have been endeavouring, while here, to settle my administration on the estate of our friend the late Judge Jones, and believe that I shall accomplish it. The settlement of my account with the estate, is ⟨necessarily?⟩ involvd in the other, & in recurring to former transaction[s], I find, that I must give you, some little trouble in the affair. The two papers enclosed, will explain the...
I have lately heard with much pleasure of your return in good health to monticello, to which place, I address, this letter. The papers relating to mr dodge partner of the late mr Cathalan, were reciev’d & deposited in the dep t of State. Altho’ no promise was made to him, relation to the office, application to the present time, yet being there, in the discharge of its duties, under the...
I receiv’d at Washington your letters respecting Mr. Lehre, Mr R. B. Lee & Mr Scott, and in consequence of the pressure of business there, declind answering them, untill after my arrival here. I had made up my opinion while in So. Car: in favor of Mr Pringle, who is a republican, President of the State Senate, and without being a very popular man, respected by all. The opposing candidates were...
Mr Vaughan, with whose character you are I presume well acquainted, left this city lately on a visit to Mr Jefferson, & yourself, by Norfolk & Richmond, having much desire to see him once more, & to become personally acquainted with you, before, he returns to Kennebeck in Maine, to remain stationary the residue of his days. He was the confidential friend of the M. of Landsdowne & Dr Franklin...
I was much gratified by your late letter to find that you had recover’d your health, which has since been confirm’d by Edward Coles. The view which you take of the late proceedings in Florida, affords me great pleasure, being that — which we had formed, on the same evidence, and acted, in the measures connected with them. on receiving Gen l Jackson’s report, our attention was directed...
A most afflicting event occurrd yesterday, the death of Genl. A: Mason, killd in a duel by Mr McCarty. They fought with muskets. The distress is universal & deep, proceeding from regret at the loss of the highly respected & meritorious individual, & the terrible example it exhibits of party feuds. The debate respecting the proceedings in Florida is still depending, tho’ it is probable that it...
I believe I now send you the document you asked for, in the form, you wished it. Mr Gallatin & Mr Rush have formd a treaty with G Britain, by which the commercl. convention is continued for 10. years, the questions of boundary & fisheries are settled, as is that respecting slaves taken in the late war, & Columbia river, but on what conditions, we know not, as the treaty is not yet receivd. The...
General King of the district of Maine in Massachusetts, being desirous, of making you a visit, I take much pleasure in promoting his wishes by giving him this introduction to you. His steady & firm attachment to the principles of our govt., & support of it, in the late war, by very meritorious services, are known to you. I hope that you derive no inconvenience from this severe attack of cold...
General King of the District of maine [mass:] expressing a desire of being known to you personally, & his intention, to make you a visit, I take much interest in forwarding his views, by giving him this introduction. His uniform support of the republican cause, & useful services, in the late war, are I presume known to you. I hear with great pleasure that your health is completely restord....
The enclosed from Mr Rush, which you will return at your leisure, gives the latest intelligence from England, except what is containd in a statment from Mr Maury, of the gradual augmentation of our shipping, beyond that of G. B., in the trade between this country & G. B. I send you a copy of the documents relating to our affrs. with Spain, from a distant date to the last session inclusive....
I send you a copy of the documents relating to negotiations with Spain , from a very distant day, to the end of the last Session, which will be interesting to you, tho’ not new, having had the direction of them, in the stage, which formd the outline of what has since followd. Our attitude with the allied powers, in regard to S o Am: , is as favorable, as it well can be, mr Rush & mr Gallatin...
I had the pleasure to receive your letter of the 2d. yesterday. We shall set out to morrow & be with you the day after. I am much pushd by many important concerns to get to Washington as soon as possible, but will certainly remain a day with you. Mr Crowninshield has resignd, & that dept., suffers, most essentially in some interesting circumstances. I have thoughts of offering it to Mr Snider...
J. Monroe has the pleasure to submit to mr Jefferson ’s perusal a letter from Judge Bland , on S o american aff rs , which he mentiond to him sometime since. If the weather & mr Jefferson ’s health permit J. M. will be very much gratified by his company to day, with the gentlemen, now at Monticello , who promisd, with Col Randolph , to dine with him to day. RC
The enclosed from Mr Rush, will give you a view of our present relations with England. Retain them till we meet, which I expect will be next week. The meeting of the visitors, is to be, I understand, then, in which, we shall expect to see you, if not we shall have the pleasure of se[e]ing you at your own house as we go to Washington, which we propose doing next week. We hope that you are all...
J. M ’s best respects to mr Jefferson . He has the pleasure to send, for his perusal, a late letter from mr Rush , which it may be gratifying to mr Jefferson to see. J. M. will retake it, the next time he calls at Monticello . He hopes that mr Jeffersons health continues to improve. RC ( MHi ); dateline at foot of text; endorsed by TJ as received 17 Sept. 1818 from
Sometime ago you intimated to me a desire to dispose of a small tract of land, which you have between mr Alexander s & my land lying below the Blenhims tract. As this is detatched from your other lands, it is probable, that you may still be desirous of parting from it, and that it may fall into other hands, [which I should regret] without an arrangment between us. If my impression is correct,...
mr Poinsett , whose name & character are I presume well known to you will have the pleasure of giving you this introduction. He was employd very usefully in S o America , several years, under mr Madison , & had previously travelled thro’ most of the European countries & particularly Russia , by whose Sovereign he was known, & treated with much attention. I expected to have presented him...
I declind answering your letter, untill I could obtain some details, which were material, in relation to its object. The interest, which you take, in favor of persons a family, with whom you are so closely connected, & with whose merit, you are so well acquainted, commands my great high respect & warm approbation, and it would give me much great satisfaction, if circumstances permitted, an...
I came home yesterday, & should have called at Monticello this morning, but for an injury I receivd in one of my legs on the journey, which has inflamed it. A few days nurs ing will I hope restore it. I shall call as soon as I can ride out. I hope that you & your family are well, & that the business in which you are engagd has taken a direction satisfactory to you RC ( MHi ); addressed: “M r...