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Mr Sullivan who will have the pleasure to present you this letter, intending to visit the upper part of our State, & particularly the university, having expressd a desire to be made known to you, I give him with pleasure this introduction. He is the son of gov r Sullivan of Massachusetts with whom you were probably acquainted. With great respect & sincere regard I am dear Sir your friend— MHi .
Mr. Livingston intimated to me some time since, his desire to hold with you and Mr. Jefferson, the same relation which he held in 1798., & that I would communicate that sentiment to you on his part, & apprize him of the result. I think that I informd you that Mr Conway had been appointed to a land office in Alabama. Having communicated to Mr. Jefferson, the views taken in the admn., respecting...
The claim of the State, for the allowance of interest, on monies borrowed & applied to the payment of the militia in the late war, has been considerd by the administration, in a full meeting, at the instance of the Senators, & of Mr Cabell, & the result has been, that the allowance could not be made by the Executive, the uniform decision in such cases, having been against it. The claim will be...
I have the pleasure to inform you that the Senate has confirmd the nomination of Mr. Conway, to a land office in Alabama, as valuable in point of profit, as I am assur’d, tho’ not that, for which you recommended him. Of this be so good as to inform Mr Catlet Conway your neighbour. The vacancy at Petersbg. gave me great embarrassment, as to the person, to be selected for it. Dr. Field had...
Such has been the pressure on me of late, that I have not had a moment, to pay attention or even answer the calls of my friends. I have felt that I had faild, both to you, and to Mr Madison. there have been several candidates, under me, in the adm n for the office which I hold, and such the activity & animosity of their respective advocates & friends, towards, the rival candidates, that my...
I have been so much pressd by various duties since the meeting of Congress that I have scarcely had a moment for my friends. The body increases and the number of new members, has added its share to my burdens. The only material fact, that has come to our knowledge since my last to you, relating to the views of the allied powers on So. Am: amounts to this, that the presumption that they would...
The bearer Richard H. Lee, a grand son of the revolutionary character of that name, will have the pleasure to present to you this letter. He has been employed in writing the biography of his ancestor, and has thought, as you were an active party to many of the great events of that important epoch, & well acquainted with all, that you might be able, & would give him, very useful information, in...
Since my last we have received no communication from Mr Rush, on the subject of Mr Cannings proposition. From our chargé des aff rs in France a letter has been recently rec d by which it appears that the British Ambassador there, had intimated to the French Minister of foreign affairs, the desired expectation of his gov t that no measure should be decided on, by the allied powers, without a...
I have long intended to write you to communicate further views respecting the proposition by Mr. C. to Mr R., but have been so much pressd by the duties of the moment, & by calls, that I have not been able to do it. Just before the meeting of Congress the Russian minister addressd a note to Mr Adams, informing him, that the Emperor, having heard that Genl. D’Everaux had been appointed minister...
Shortly after the receipt of yours of the 24 th of October, & while the subject treated in it, was under consideration, the Russian minister, drew the attention of the gov t to the same subject, tho’ in a very different sense, from that in which it had been done by Mr Canning. Baron Tuyll, announcd in an official letter, and as was understood by order of the Emperor, that having heard that the...
I enclosed you yesterday, a copy of the message, & now send another, rather in larger print. I have concurr’d fully in the sentiments, expressd by you, & Mr. Jefferson, in regard to the attitude to be assumd, at the present interesting crisis, as I am persu[a]ded you will find, respecting the views of the allied powers towards So. america. On this subject I will write again, and communicate...
I now forward to you a copy of the message, more legible than that which sent by the last mail. I have concurr’d thoroughly with the sentiments expressd in your late letter, as I am persuaded, you will find, by the message, as to the part we ought to act, toward the allied powers, in regard to S o America. I consider the cause of that country, as essentially our own. That the crisis is fully...
Two dispatches have been lately receivd from Mr. Rush, communicating a proposition from Mr Canning, confidentially made to him, of cooperation between our two governments, in opposing, by reciprocal declaration, in the first instance, a project which he thinks exists, of the holy alliance, to invade the So. american states, as soon as the business with Spain is settled, & which he intimates...
I transmit to your two despatches, which were receiv’d from mr Rush, while I was lately in Washington, which involve interests of the highest importance. They contain two letters from mr Canning, suggesting designs of the holy alliance, against the Independance of S o America, & proposing a cooperation, between G. Britain & the UStates, in support of it, against the members of that alliance....
The unfavorable state of the weather since my arrival here, has kept me so much confind, that I have been unable, to pay, that attention to my affairs, that I should otherwise have done. I shall however be with you in the course of the insuing week. I send you a letter from Judge Nelson, & two from Mr. Appleton, which give the latest accounts, from them, of affairs in Spain. I send you also,...
I enclose you, the latest account, which I have rec d of the affairs of spain, and of the incidents attending our mission there, in a letter from Judge Nelson. you will see, that the frigate has been warned, off, the port, whereby his entering has been prevented. Two letters from mr Appleton, of an earlier state, directly, from Cadiz will communicate other interesting details DLC : Papers of...
Can you give me any information respecting the boundaries, of your small tract of land, between mr Alexanders & mine, to enable me to ascertain its brasing, on the lower end, of that portion of mine, belonging to the Blenheim tract, & of the other tracts, which I purchased, of Henderson & Anthony Watkins. This knowledge will be material, in case, I should survey my land, while I am in the...
It will afford me great pleasure to sit for the artist, mentiond, in yours, just received, & to hold a place in society with those, who have been so highly, & deservedly, honourd by their country. I will receive him to morrow, and afterwards, as may suit our mutual convenience. I was very fearful that you sufferd by the rain yesterday, but hope that you escapd it. MHi .
It is painful for me to pass you, but some private concerns, & particularly the expectation of meeting Mr. Goodwyn, with whom I am in negotiation for the sale of my land, and who was expected there the day before yesterday hurries me on. We will indemnify ourselves on our return, in abt. a fortnight. I do not think it probable, that I shall sell, but I wish to be there as soon as in my power....
We came here on thursday last, with intention to proceed on to Albemarle, on Monday next, but such is the state of Mrs. Monroe’s health, that I do not know that it will be possible for her to undertake the journey. The trip here has derangd her whole system, & particularly her nervous system, & head. If she cannot accompany me, I must take her back to Washington, which will be decided in a day...
The inclosed letters from mr Appleton & gen l Dearborn, will give you our latest intelligence from Cadiz & Lisbon, which you will find of a very gloomy & discouraging nature. After perusing them, be so kind as to enclose them to Mr Madison, with a request that he return them to me. Our accounts from S o America, & Mexico, indicate, that those people must undergo great difficulties before they...
¶ From James Monroe. Letter not found. Ca. 9 August 1823. Offered for sale in the American Art Association, Catalogue of President Madison’s Correspondence from American Statesmen and Patriots American Art Association, Illustrated Catalogue of President Madison’s Correspondence from American Statesmen and Patriots … Collection of the Late Frederick B. McGuire (New York, 1917). , 26 Feb. 1917,...
The view which you have communicated of the condition, relation, & disposition, of Cuba, & its inhabitants, founded on the information of M r Miralla, is very interesting. It accords also in every particular, with that which has been taken here, aided by all the light which we have been able to obtain, through the most authentic channels, from the Island. The people consider Columbia, too...
I enclose you such documents mentiond in your memo: as are to be obtaind from the dept. of war. Those to be found, in the Natil. advocate, will be sent as soon as obtaind. There being no file of that paper, in that dept., they must be looked for elsewhere. I have allowed to Mr. Morris, the expence of his journey from Cadiz to Madrid six hundred dolrs., & a like sum to replace him there, &...
I deeply regret to have been compelled, as you will see by the gazettes, to advertise my lands in albemarle for sale, but in truth the debts which I owe, owing to bad management, bad crops, expensive trusts with incompetent salaries, untill the present, the savings from which, with the most rigid œconomy, will do little more than pay the interest, leave me no alternative. I am too far advanced...
I regretted very much that my duties here, with the necessity I was under to pass through Loudon & remain there some days, detaind me so long, as to deprive me of the pleasure of seeing you, on my late visit to albemarle. Being informed by M rs Randolph that you intended to return in a fortnight I should have prolongd my stay there for that term, but was compelled to return, to revise the...
I receivd with great pleasure your favor of the 29 of march, with a copy of one which you had sent to our friend mr Short, and should not be surpris.d, if the prediction containd in this letter, should be verified, by a rapid succession of events, proceeding from the mov’ment of the french government lately announced in the Speech of the King. when it is recollected that he, his whole family,...
I expected before this to have had the pleasure of seeing you on my way to Albemarle, but I have not be [ sic ] able to leave the city, as yet, tho’ I expect to do it, to morrow, on a short visit to Loudon, and after returning here to proceed on by your house, to mine in that quarter. The Secretary under the board, instituted under the convention with G. B. relating to the 1st art: of the...
¶ From James Monroe. Letter not found. 3 February 1823 . Described as a three-page autograph letter, signed, listed for sale in the Charles Hamilton Catalogue No. 103 (24 Feb. 1977), item 161, summarized and abstracted as follows: “dealing with a post for Madison’s nephew, a constitutional matter concerning grants of power in which he is in apparent disagreement both with Madison and...
I have long indulged a hope that I should be able to retire from this office, without the sale of any portion of my property, but I begin now to despair of it. The debts contracted in support of plantations, which ought to have made a clear & handsome income, with those incident to most of the trusts which I have held, are such, as almost to deprive me of all hope of retiring under such...