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I have receivd yours of the 12th. Since my return home I have recover’d daily from the debilitating effect of my late indisposition, so that I have reason to presume on a thorough restoration in a short time, if circumstances shod. allow me to remain here. I feel however uneasy lest something shod. occur in which my absence might be improper. I am surprised that we hear nothing from our...
The late heat has not agreed well with me; I shall however set out for albemarle tomorrow with my family, where I have been expected some days past. I had at first intended to leave mrs monroe here, but after duly considering the subject it has been decided that she & both our daughters will go up with me. This change producd a delay of some days to make the necessary preparation. If my health...
I have had the pleasure to receive yours of the 18th. I have inform’d Mr Changuyon, that altho it would be agreeable to you to receive him at your own house, to afford him an opportunity to present his letter of recall, you would to prevent delay dispense with that form & receive it thro’ me: that I would lay it before you, as soon as he should transmit it, unless he desird a personal...
We came here on sunday & shall proceed to Richmond the day after to morrow. We left washington on saturday. We concurr’d in the opinion suggested in your letter that it would be proper to execute the law for reducing the army, and to permit the squadron to sail for the mediteranean, with instructions to keep a look out as to events, & the mov’ment of the fleets of other powers. These measures...
I recd. yours with the communications lately forwarded to you from France, by the mail of this morning. Mr Dallas Mr Crowninshield & I are to meet, after 2 p.m., at which hour, I shall receive Mr Baker, in consequence of his application. I may be able to extract something from him, on the points under consideration, that may have influence in the deliberations on them; Indeed he may have asked...
The Bearer, Mr. Wm. Taylor, is the Gentleman who was appointed by Mr. Skipwith to reside at St. Domingo, as the agent of the United States. As he proposes to pass thro’ Orange County, on his way to New Orleans, and is desirous of seeing you, I take the liberty of giving him this letter, to make him known to you, especially as he may be able to make some interesting details to you in relation...
I fear that it will not be in my power to leave this for the present. Several of our friends have advised me not to do it, lest it might be injurious to us both. The reason is the unsettled state of Europe, & the suspension of some of the most important measures of the govt. in consequence. They say that the President & Secry. of State ought not both to be absent at once, especially as there...
Mr Shaler intimates that the commanders of the squadrons about to sail for the medeteranean, expect some additional allowance to their pay in the navy, on account of their new office as commissioners to treat for peace, and that it may be made by a sum in gross for the expences of their table. I have conferrd with Com: Rodgers on the subject, who thinks that the claim is reasonable, and is...
Mr Baker inform’d me in the interview which I lately had with him, that the British commanders would deliver up the posts with the exception of Michilamackinac without delay, & that as soon as barracks could be rebuilt for the troops to be removd thence to St Joseph’s, at the latter place, Michilk. would also be restord. He has written me to this effect. I have answerd his note & pressd an...
I have receivd yours of the 28th. april, from monticello. The late events in France will doubtless be sensibly felt by most of the powers of Europe, and even by the UStates. I suggested some ideas in my last, growing out of them, for your consideration. With those powers, generally, there is no regard for principle. Every thing is decided, by a prospect of advantage, & renown. I have no doubt...
Mr. Dallas inform’d me that he had forwarded to you a communication to him from Phila., founded on an acct. from Rochelle in France of the restoration of Boniparte in march last. The details which have reached us, give to the report a strong claim to credit, independently, of other circumstances making such an event highly probable. The whole army, marshalls, generals, & soldiers, have been I...
The instructions & comn., to mr Shaler & the commodores, and letter to the Dey were forwarded yesterday, soon after the receit of which, it may be presumd, from the of preparation in which the squadron is, that it will sail. I sent letters to the secretaries of State of all the powers on the mediteranean, notifying the measure and expressing your desire that the squadron might be recd. kindly...
I expected to have had the pleasure of seeing you, more than a month past, and to have deliver’d to you the enclosed letters on finance in person, with a paper on the same subject, which was written in our revolution by the President , & given to me for perusal, with a request that I would forward it to you for the same purpose. The ill health of M rs Monroe , and more recently of our daughter...
I have yours of the 23 d. Col: Aspinwall is desirous of obtaining the appointment to London as you were apprizd before you left us. The principal competitors are Col: Drayton & Com: Barney. The loss of his arm gives him I think a stronger claim than either of the others, and will perhaps reconcile both of them to his appointment. His appointment would open a place in the army for some other...
The affair with onis will require much delicacy in the managment of it. Our relations with spain, in detail especially, are perhaps less understood than with France or England, owing to the crisis never having obtaind the same height with her, and they being in consequence of much less importance. Her conduct has been equally unprincipled towards the UStates, and in many respects very...
I send you within, copies of the other letters that were address’d to General Pinckney. I find that one only had been forwarded to you. A gentleman recommended by general mason, mr magruder, who resided sometime in the w. Indies has been sent, on a like agency to Bermuda, to go thence where circumstances may invite for the two fold purpose of establishing sales, & getting the slaves back....
I returned yesterday from Loudoun, rather injur’d than benefitted by the trip. The slightest exposure, since my late indisposition produces cold & fever, both of which I have suffer’d in my absence. I found our daughter sick of the epidemick, & mrs. M. not much improvd in her health. These circumstances will keep us longer here than we had intended & expected. I had the pleasure to receive...
I return you mr Jefferson’s letters, having shewn them to mr Dallas. I enclose some letters from mr Pinkney in one of which he is joined by mr Nicholson. As the communication is of a delicate nature, I do not wish them to be returnd here till about thursday next, as I leave town to morrow for Loudoun & may not get back till wednesday evening. When returnd, note, them as private. I see nothing...
I enclose you a letter from mr Changuyon, in reply to one I wrote him shortly after your departure, in which I stated your willingness to enter into a new treaty with his govt., to make the old one the basis, and referr’d to the late act of Congress, for abolishing all discriminating duties, on the condition stated, as an evidence of the good disposition of this govt. to meet other powers in...
I send you a sketch of a letter, of instructions to our commissrs to treat with the Dey of Algiers, & a project of a letter from you to the Dey; to be used, if they find it expedient so to do. I send a blank paper for your signature, to be substituted to that sent, should you deem alterations in it necessary. I send you also a copy of two letters to genl. Pinckney respecting the slaves which...
I receiv’d yours of the 5th. & 8th. this morning. I will endeavour to forward you by tomorrow’s mail a copy of the letter to genl. Pinckney, which corresponds strictly with that to Mr Baker respecting the treaty, & with what has passed between us relative to the sale of slaves in the W Indies. How much shall be given for the ransom of our people to the Dey of Algiers? I will forward for your...
Mr Shaler return’d from norfolk yesterday & leaves this for new york to morrow. The squadron, to sail under com: Decatur, is prepard for sea & will sail, in the course of next week, as is understood. I hope to receive your ideas respecting instructions to the commissrs., by to morrow’s mail. Peace without tribute is the principal object. The commissn. sent for your signature, includes Mr....
I have received yours of the 29th. ulto: with the project of a letter in reply to adml. Cochrane. The alterations suggested will improve it, tho’ I doubt whether I ought to enter into the subject with him. It may produce an insulting reply. I am inclined to think that it will be better to communicate with Mr Baker on the subject. I am endeavouring to collect proof of the most material facts,...
I enclose you a project of a letter to adml. Cochrane, in reply to his, which I lately sent you. The subject is in every view of it a very delicate one. You will suggest any changes, you may think proper, on the enclosed project. In my report to the Senate, I intimate that further investigation will be made to place this subject in its true light. Does the expression of regret that an appeal...
The enclosed letters was received since you left us, one from Col: Cochrane Johnston, the other from his brother admiral Cochrane. Either Burr, Bollman, or Sanders, was I presume the author of the papers recd. from the former, whom I knew in London. You recollect the charge aganst him, with his nephew Ld. Cochrane, which has probably brought him to this country. On the subject of the other...
Whereas it has been represented to me that a certain Sloop, or vessel, called the Fame, whereof Barnabas Haskell was master, did, some time in the year 1814, commit a breach of the act of Congress passed on the 2d of August, 1813, entitled “An Act to prohibit the use of licenses, or passes, granted by the authority of the Government of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland,” and...
§ From James Monroe. 2 March 1815, War Department. “I have the honor respectfully to propose for your approbation the appointment of Bernard Pratte, of the Mississippi Territory, as a Brigadier General of the upper or northern Brigade of the Militia of said Territory. ” Letterbook copy ( DNA : RG 107, LSP ). 1 p. JM forwarded the nomination to the Senate on 3 Mar. 1815 ( DNA : RG 46, Executive...
The undersigned acting as Secretary of State to whom was referred the resolution of the Senate of the 24th. of October last, requesting the President of the United States to lay before the Senate (provided he shall not consider the same improper to be communicated) the proof of any traffic carried on in the West Indies by the sale of Negroes taken from the United States by the British forces...
An opportunity offering this evening of conversing freely with Mr. Dallas, on the subject of the nominations you have had in contemplation I should have availed myself of it, had I not found that you had not done it, to any extent at least. It was afforded by his calling here, to converse on the subject of my report which I had sent to him last night. I expressd a hope that he would remain...
§ From James Monroe. 23 February 1815, War Department. “I have the honor respectfully to propose for your approbation the enclosed appointments and correction in the Army of the United States.” RC and enclosure ( DNA : RG 46, Executive Proceedings, Nominations, 13B–A3); letterbook copy and letterbook copy of enclosure ( DNA : RG 107, LSP ). RC 1 p.; in a clerk’s hand, signed by Monroe. The...