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I hope that you & Mrs Madison derive all the satisfaction & comfort which the country can afford, after the fatigue of the last winter here. My daughter continues to be very weak, but as Mr Hay has arrived, they with Mrs M. will probably set out on their intended journey sometime next week. After their departure, I shall leave this for Albemarle by Loudoun, calling on you as I pass, of which...
As my letters to Mr Pinkny & Mr Gallatin are partially concluded, and little is to add to that to Mr Russell I have thought that a trip to Loudoun to return on tuesday, will be no embarrassment to public concerns, and some advantage to myself. You will, I understood, from Mr Todd, yesterday, not leave town till the last of the week. Mr Dallas leaves it on wednesday. I saw him last night. He is...
The Revd. John H. Rice called on me to day, with a view that I might present him to you. He is on his way to New York, to attend a general meeting of the bible societies of the UStates, and the object of his call was, to solicit such countenance to them, as yourself & the others, in the principal offices of the govt., might be disposd to give, not as members of the govt., but individuals...
The enclosed may gave you some amusment. I have read neither, and cannot therefore speak of their merits. one is attributed to armstrong & the other to winder. The book which you were so kind as to send me respecting Louisiana will be taken advantage of, in the contemplated discussion with the Spanish gov t . It shall be restord afterwards. your letter to Miss Bruff was sent to her as soon as...
The Secretary of State, to whom was referred the resolution of the House of Representatives, requesting the President to cause to be laid before the House a statement of the number of impressed American seamen confined in Dartmoor prison; the number surrendered, given up, or taken from on board British vessels captured during the late war; together with their places of residence, respectively,...
The Secretary of State, to whom was referred the resolution of the House of Representatives, requesting the President to cause to be laid before that House information relative to the duties laid on articles imported from the United States into the British provinces of Canada, Nova Scotia, and New Brunswick; relative to the duties on articles exported to the United States from the said...
Major Thompson belongd to a Penna. brigade in the revolutionary war, when I knew him. He was I think a subaltern. I have seen him often, since I came here, & apparently in indigent circumstances. I have always thought well of him, without any minute knowledge of him. DNA : RG 59—ML—Miscellaneous Letters.
The enclosed from Genl. Ripley, was intended for my own inspection only; but as it is interesting in many views, and especially as his objects can be effectd only by your being acquaintd with them & his reason in their favor, and your seeing it, can do no harm to him or any other person, I send it to you. I send also Mr. Bagots reply to my note respecting the British Commissn. for the...
Col: Hawkins, will accept the offer of agent, for the boundary under Porter; and there is reason to think that they are on a very good footing. His name is "Samuel". He had better be sent in to day, and it will fortunate if he & Col: Austin go together. Consuls , I.C. Barnett (of Jersey) for Paris- Septimious Tyler of Connecticut for Bayonne- Joseph Ficklin, Kentucky, for St. Bartholomews-...
I was much gratified to find that you approved the ground taken with the Spanish minister , respecting the sp h colonies & in our affairs with Spain generally. the minister left this shortly after the correspondence for Phil a , on account of the ill health of his family, not in disgust as has been represented. He has since arrival there written me another letter, adhering to his former...
The letters to D r Jackson & mr Appleton received with yours of the 16 th shall be forwarded by the first opportunity, of which, many, frequently offer. you will settle the question between m r Short and me, whenever it may be most convenient to yourself & the arbitrators. my attendance is altogether unnecessary. I will instruct a m r York who has succeeded
The Secretary of State respectfully submits to the President the nominating to the gentleman as vice consul for the Island of St. Thomas. DNA : RG 59—LAR—Letters of Application and Recommendation.
I have this moment recd. a letter from Mr Hay, & several others from other persons, chiefly on private concerns, from Mr Graham, by the messenger of the dep’t. I found on my arrival, Mrs Hay much indisposed of a sore throat & fever, of which she was beginning to recover, & from which she has since so far recover’d, as to authorize a hope of our being able to set out for Washington the day...
I intended to have written you by the two last mails but was interrupted at the moment I had allotted for the purpose. In truth I had little to communicate, which it was worth troubling you with, while ingaged in packing up & preparing for your departure for this place. Mr Cutts intimated to me that you would probably leave home the beginning of this week, which, coinciding with your intention...
I arriv’d here last night, having left my family in Loudoun, to attend some preparation for their reception, & my report of the health of the city. I find that cases of indisposition have occurr’d, proceeding from the late heat, but untill the last & present week, the city was never more healthy. I hope that the present approaching change in the weather will dissipate every unfavorable...
Judge Roane committed to my charge his opinion on the question whether the congress had power to regulate an appeal from the superior courts of the States individually, and of course from any of their courts, in cases relating to treaties & laws of the U states , with a view that I might submit it to you. He remarked that his opinion had not been deliver’d, the cause tho’ argued, being still...
I returnd here on friday last, the 15., much improvd in my health, & propose setting out on monday or tuesday for your house, from whence I shall proceed by Loudoun, for Washington, at such time, as it shall appear to you adviseable for me to be there. My whole family accompany me, tho’ I fear, as mr Clay & his, form a part of it, that we shall subject mrs. Madison to some inconvinence. We...
I am now on my return home, where I expect to arrive on friday next. I visited the white sulphur, & sweet springs, & staid 10 or 12. days at each. From the former I derivd advantage, and might have been equally fortunate at the latter, had I not caught a cold, from which I have not had entirely recoverd. I think on the whole that the trip promises to be useful to me. Bonaparte it seems has...
I arriv’d here on the 21., and have already deriv’d advantage from the use of the water. I propose to leave this for the sweet springs on the 28. or 9., and after remaining there a week at most, to return home, where I expect to be on the 12., if not sooner. My hope is sanguine, that this trip will completely restore my health. This water, promises to remove every unfavorable simptom of bile,...
I was mistaken in supposing that I had sent mr Cathcarts letter to the Dept.; I now enclose it to you with some other papers which you may not have seen. I am just setting out for the springs and have only time to present the respects of my family to mrs madison & mrs Cutts, and also to the old Lady, and my best wishes for your welfare. RC ( DLC : Rives Collection, Madison Papers). Docketed by...
The career of Bonaparte is it seems ended. What effect his abdication may have is uncertain. It may stop the progress of the allies, save his life, & secure to the nation some agency, in the appointment of its future sovereign. This will probably be the case if the allies treat with the national assembly, which appears to have been organized, on the motion of La Fayette. But if they disregard...
I am much gratified to hear that mr Crawford has consented to take the dept. of war. I think he will render useful service, & gain credit by it. My family are very anxious that I should visit the sulphur springs, thinking that the use of the waters is necessary to the complete restoration of my health. In this they are supported, by the advice of the phisicians, particularly dr Everett, in...
I return Mr Cutts’s letters. The accounts from France present a gloomy prospect in relation to Bonaparte, under the most favorable view that can be taken of them. The loss of so many cannon, is a strong proof of a retrograde movment, if not defeat. This is stated by Wellington & may therefore be relied on. The last letter, if true, is decisive. I have supposed that his hope of success was...
J. M’s best respects to mr Jefferson. He encloses him a hand bill just receivd which seems to confirm the account of yesterday. RC ( MHi ); dateline at foot of text; addressed: “M r Jefferson Monticello”; endorsed by TJ as received 11 Aug. 1815 and so recorded in SJL . Enclosure not found.
I return the papers relating to Fort Washington with my entire concurrence in the result proposed in the report of mr Dallas; that major L’Enfant be no longer employd & that the superintendance be committed to an officer of the Corps of Engineers. I submit it however for consideration, whether a milder term than, “discharg’d,” may not be used. He came into the service at a distressing period...
We have had no rain since my arrival here, nor had there been any for some time before. The most discouraging prospect for corn exists, which added to a defective crop of small grain, menaces us with almost a famine. I am glad to hear that the Neptune has enterd the Delaware. Of the Passengers we shall be better informd tomorrow. I send every paper back to the depts. lately receivd except that...
I found my family, except our gd. child, much recover’d from their indisposition. She is improving, but weak. I am in better health. I return to you Mr Jeffersons letter. The others will be forwarded to Mr Pleasanton. Mr Jefferson is in good health, & intends to make you a visit in a few days. I had intended to go to the sulphur spring, & Mr Hay had agreed to accompany me, but I find myself so...
Mr Serurier presented to me yesterday a copy of his letter of credence from the Emperor reappointing him Minister to the ustates. He read me at the same time the letter accompanying it from the minister of his govt., by which he was instructed to state that his govt. was resolvd to cultivate the most friendly relations with the UStates: that in case they engaged in war, they would respect our...
The intelligence which you communicated to me the evening before I left home, of a vote having been given in the H. of C. against L d C. has not been confirmed, and I fear will not be. Little, has been receiv’d of late from Europe , but all accounts concur in the probability of a war, which Engl d prompts & leads, that will become general. Nothing can be more unprincipled than such a war,...
I set out this morning for washington in the hope of being with you on monday next, as I shall stay only one day in Loudoun. My family remain here, in the expectation of my return. My health is much improvd, but my exterior does not correspond with its former state. I shall probably derive advantage from the journey. From mr Condit I hear that our ministers are daily expected; and it is said...