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Mr Sullivan who will have the pleasure to present you this letter, intending to visit the upper part of our State, & particularly the university, having expressd a desire to be made known to you, I give him with pleasure this introduction. He is the son of gov r Sullivan of Massachusetts with whom you were probably acquainted. With great respect & sincere regard I am dear Sir your friend— MHi .
Mr. Livingston intimated to me some time since, his desire to hold with you and Mr. Jefferson, the same relation which he held in 1798., & that I would communicate that sentiment to you on his part, & apprize him of the result. I think that I informd you that Mr Conway had been appointed to a land office in Alabama. Having communicated to Mr. Jefferson, the views taken in the admn., respecting...
The claim of the State, for the allowance of interest, on monies borrowed & applied to the payment of the militia in the late war, has been considerd by the administration, in a full meeting, at the instance of the Senators, & of Mr Cabell, & the result has been, that the allowance could not be made by the Executive, the uniform decision in such cases, having been against it. The claim will be...
I have the pleasure to inform you that the Senate has confirmd the nomination of Mr. Conway, to a land office in Alabama, as valuable in point of profit, as I am assur’d, tho’ not that, for which you recommended him. Of this be so good as to inform Mr Catlet Conway your neighbour. The vacancy at Petersbg. gave me great embarrassment, as to the person, to be selected for it. Dr. Field had...
Such has been the pressure on me of late, that I have not had a moment, to pay attention or even answer the calls of my friends. I have felt that I had faild, both to you, and to Mr Madison. there have been several candidates, under me, in the adm n for the office which I hold, and such the activity & animosity of their respective advocates & friends, towards, the rival candidates, that my...
I have been so much pressd by various duties since the meeting of Congress that I have scarcely had a moment for my friends. The body increases and the number of new members, has added its share to my burdens. The only material fact, that has come to our knowledge since my last to you, relating to the views of the allied powers on So. Am: amounts to this, that the presumption that they would...
The bearer Richard H. Lee, a grand son of the revolutionary character of that name, will have the pleasure to present to you this letter. He has been employed in writing the biography of his ancestor, and has thought, as you were an active party to many of the great events of that important epoch, & well acquainted with all, that you might be able, & would give him, very useful information, in...
Since my last we have received no communication from Mr Rush, on the subject of Mr Cannings proposition. From our chargé des aff rs in France a letter has been recently rec d by which it appears that the British Ambassador there, had intimated to the French Minister of foreign affairs, the desired expectation of his gov t that no measure should be decided on, by the allied powers, without a...
I have long intended to write you to communicate further views respecting the proposition by Mr. C. to Mr R., but have been so much pressd by the duties of the moment, & by calls, that I have not been able to do it. Just before the meeting of Congress the Russian minister addressd a note to Mr Adams, informing him, that the Emperor, having heard that Genl. D’Everaux had been appointed minister...
Shortly after the receipt of yours of the 24 th of October, & while the subject treated in it, was under consideration, the Russian minister, drew the attention of the gov t to the same subject, tho’ in a very different sense, from that in which it had been done by Mr Canning. Baron Tuyll, announcd in an official letter, and as was understood by order of the Emperor, that having heard that the...