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Some few days since I arriv’d here and trust I have so arranged the line of communication between us, that whatever alteration the course of events may effect in my own situation, I shall have it in my power to make it subservient to my wishes. I expected I shou’d more effectually put in execution your Excellency’s Orders by coming immediately here, the source from which Governor Nash at...
Your kindness and attention to me in this and a variety of other instances has realy put me under such obligations to you that I fear I shall hardly ever have it in my power to repay them. But believe me in what ever situation of life the chance of fortune may place me, no circumstance can happen which will give me such pleasure or make me so happy, at present or during my progress thro’ life,...
I sometime since address’d a letter to you from a small estate of mine in King George whither I had retir’d to avoid the enemy from the one I lately dispos’d of on the Potowmack river. I had then the pleasure to congratulate you on your safe retreat from Richmd. to Charlotsville and anticipated the joy yourself and family must have felt on your arrival at Montichello from which the misfortune...
I propos’d to myself the pleasure of visiting yourself and family before this at Montichello but the prospects below and the arrival of Genl. Washington in the State induc’d me to postpone the trip of pleasure to the less agreeable one to camp upon the Idea of bearing some small part in bringing about the event we all so anxiously wish for. With this view I waited on Gov. Nelson and solicited...
Mr. Short being just sitting out for Monticello I am happy to take the opportunity to assure you how sincerely I thank you for the late instance of your kindness and attention to me, which I particularly value as a testimony of your regard for me, and at the same time to assure you that nothing but a series of disappointments in the vessels I had appointed to sail in deprivd me of the...
As I so lately wrote you by Mr. Short and have since daily expected to see you here I did not propose writing you till after I should have that pleasure; but as I begin to fear you will not abate that firmness and decision which you have frequently shewn in the service of your country even upon this occasion, and as I have had an opportunity since I wrote last of being better informed of the...
I am sorry I have had no opportunity or should have answer’d your favor by your servant sooner. Indeed should have wrote by him but was so unlucky as not to see him while in town. I have been much distress’d upon the subject of Mrs. Jefferson and have fear’d, as well from what you suggested yourself as what I have heard from others, that the report of each succeeding day would inform me she...
I fear this will not reach you but I risque it for tis probable you may be detaind a few days at Baltimore. I take the liberty to enclose you a cypher of men and places which will perhaps in some instances form the subject of a correspondence. I beg of you to accept my most sincere acknowledgments for your kind offer. As yet I cannot possibly determine how to act but shall consult Mr. Short....
I hope before this you have safely arriv’d in Phila. I very sensibly feel your absence not only in the solitary situation in which you have left me but upon many other accounts. What direction the delegation may take even for the short space that we shall remain here, upon the few important subjects that are before us, is to me altogether incertain. The same men still act on the same...
I have received Mr. Hopkinsons letter enclosing from the office of finance a bill containing 506 ⅔ dolrs. which I will negotiate agreeably to your desire, pay the Intendant the sum you owe him and transmit the balance. The committee, of which I am a member, appointed to view the country around Georgeton under the Princeton engagement set out this morning upon that business. I think with you...
I received this moment yours of the 21st. My letter by the last post will inform you of the occasion which pointed that as the favorable moment for a trip to Georgetown and of our availing ourselves of it. Yesterday evening we return’d. Our report will be in favor of the Maryland side and of a position near the town . Upon our return we found that business had been conducted as we expected....
I have been favord with yours of the 25 by the last post with its enclosures and will pay due attention to the contents. Two points have been effected since my last, the puting the office of finance into commission and establishment of the committee of the States and appointment of the members. Each State nominated its own member and congress confirmd the preference. The committee consists of...
By Mr. Short I have the pleasure to forward you a more complete cypher in which we will correspond in future. He will find you I hope safely arriv’d in Paris and recoverd from the fatigues of your voyage, and situated with Miss Patsy agreeably to your wish. In my letters from Annapolis I informd you of the latter proceedings of Congress and as I addressd them to Boston hope you received them....
I wrote you lately by Mr. Short from Richmd. He intended sailing in a few days from Warwick so that by this time or at least before this reaches you, you will have received it. I am so far on my way in performance of my trip thro’ the Lakes rivers &c. You will observe by this that I have chang’d my rout and commence for the westward here up the No. river, thence to the Lakes, thro’ the Lakes...
Two days since I arrivd here after performing a tour up the north river by fort Stanwix down the wood—creek, thro’ the Oneida Ontario and (by the Niagara falls) part of Lake Erie, thence back by Niagara thro the Ontario by Carlton Island thro the St. Laurence to Montreal and from Montreal over Lake Champlain by Albany to N. York again. You find I have taken a rout different from the one I...
Upon my arrival here I wrote you and committed my letter to the care of the secretary of Congress who said he would transmit it thro Mr. Morris. I hope you have received it. It gives you a concise account of my late rout to the lakes &c. as well as some observations which I thought worthy your attention in the formation of a commercial treaty with Great Britain respecting Canada . It was late...
New York, 6 Apr. 1785. Introducing John Cooper of North Carolina, who intends establishing himself in commerce in London or at the Hague. He was introduced to Monroe by “the gentleman of the No. Carolina delegation and Mr. Hardy as a person of note and probity in his line.” RC ( DLC ); 2 p.; endorsed. Entered in SJL as received 23 Sep. 1785, “by W. Short.” Enclosed in John Cooper to TJ, 2 Aug....
Since my last I have received yours of the 11th. of Novr. and 10th. of Decr., the former by Col. LeMaire, from whom however I did not receive it altho’ I saw him, nor untill after his arrival nearly a month and then I believe by post from Phila. I have had the same difficulty with the cypher but from a different cause. The copy of that I sent by Mr. Short I left in Virga. when I sate out for...
By Colo. Smith secretary to the London Legation I wrote you in April last very fully upon our transactions previous to that date. I also inclos’d you the Journals that were then printed with the copy of a report upon the first paragraph of the 9th. of the articles of Confideration proposing a change in it and the absolute investment of the U.S. with the controul of commerce. I now inclose you...
By Mr. and Mrs. Macauly Graham I have the pleasure to transmit this. They intend immediately for the south of France and as from yours in March I had reason to suspect you intended thither I have suggested to them the probability of their meeting you in that quarter. This lady is the author of the history under her name. She hath been on a visit to Mount Vernon, hath been well receiv’d by...
I have had the pleasure to receive yours by Mr. Adams with the cypher accompanying it and am happy to hear of the recovery of your health. I have only fail’d writing you by two of the packets the first of which sail’d before I had been advis’d she would, and the 2d. while I was ill of a pleurisy which I caught by walking in the rain to Congress and had like to have given me my final repose....
We have the honor of addressing this by our worthy friend, the honorable Mr. Sayre, who was formerly Sheriff of London. The active part, which at the commencement of the revolution, he took in favor of America, is, we presume, too well known to you, to require a relation: and the loss he sustained, in consequence of his opposition to the british ministry, is not less a matter of general...
Since my last nothing very material hath taken place here. I leave this meerly to inform you of my departure hence for the Indian treaty on the Ohio which will be in about two hours. The two commercial propositions are as they were. Although congress will I believe not adjourn yet , I apprehend the business of consequence will be postpon’d for the present, perhaps till the winter. There is but...
My last advis’d you of my departure hence on the 24th of August last for the westward, with intention to take a view of the indian treaty to be held at the mouth of the big Miamis, and of the country lying between lake Erie, and the head waters of James or Potowk. river, with those which empty from either side into the Ohio, thence to attend the federal court on the 15. of Novr. at Wmsburg....
Since my last I have received yours of Decr. 11th. and Jany. 27th last. Untill lately we have had so thin a Congress that few acts of consequence have pass’d, a very pointed recommendation to those States who have hitherto declined, to accede to the recommendation of respecting a revenue system only excepted. Since which R. Island and Georgia have acceded to the impost fully, so that it now...
Since my last but little hath been done in Congress. We have had generally no more than 7. States present. The only time that 9. were their time was employd upon the subject of the Connecticut cession, which ultimately was accepted; whereby she cedes all the land lying westward of a line to be drawn westward of the Pena. line parallel with the same. Our State voted against it but were in...
I have not heard from you for several months past, the last being dated sometime previous to your removal to London. Not knowing you would have staid so long I have wrote you by every packet to France. We have now present 12. States and hope this will be the case for some time. Soon after my arrival here in the winter I suggested to you my apprehensions that the condition of the act of cession...
My last advis’d you of the progress of Spanish negotiation. Until that time the reference of Jay’s letter to a committee was , I believe, the point at which it rested ; but to enable you to form a satisfactory opinion of the object of that letter I transcribe you only operative paragraph in it. “ I take the liberty therefore of submitting to the consideration of Congress whether it might not...
Since my last I have receiv’d yours of the 9. of July. I advis’d you therein of the progress that had been made by Mister Jay in the Spanish negociation , that he had brought a project before Congress for shutting the Mississippi and not for opening it for the term of twenty five or thirty years combin’d with some commercial stipulations , the latter to be the price of the former, although...
I can scarcely venture on an apology for my silence for sometime past but hope notwithstanding to be forgiven. Since I left N. Yk. I have been employ’d in the discharge of duties entirely new to me, oftentimes embarrassing and of course highly interesting, but which have sought the accomplishment of only a few objects. In Octr. last I was admitted to the bar of the courts of appeal and...
I must depend on your kindness to pardon my omission in not writing you oftener, for I will not pretend to justify it. I should have wrote you as before, and can give no satisfactory reason even to myself why I have not, for that my communications will not be of much importance I do not urge as an excuse. I will however make amends in future. The real pleasure of my life, which consists in...
Altho I am persuaded you will have received the proceedings of our convention upon the plan of government submitted from Phila. yet as it is possible this may reach you sooner than other communications I herewith enclose a copy to you. These terminated as you will find in a ratification which must be consider’d; so far as a reservation of certain rights go, as conditional, with the...
Your favor of the 9th. of August last has been received. Before this I doubt not mine of a date subsequent to those you acknowledge has reach’d you. It gave you a detail of the proceedings of the convention of this state, since which the eleven that have adopted the government, under the act of Congress that was necessary to put them in motion, have taken the necessary measures for its...
The badness of the weather and Mrs. M’s ill health has prevented our calling on you since we saw you. As the people of the county intend to make you their acknowledgments for your services, sometime in the course of the ensuing week , I have thought it might not be improper to give you a view of the manner in which they propose to express them. I forwarded your letters by the post to Richmond...
Your friends have been made uneasy by a report of your indisposition, but flatter themselves it has been remov’d ere this, as they hear it was a periodical complaint you have had before and which was never accompanied with any dangerous symptoms. I have just return’d from Albemarle whither I went lately from the chancery to qualify in the circuit court of the U. States. The Judges were...
I wrote you lately by Judge Wilson whom I accompanied to the circuit court at Charlottesville. I have since been to the chancery which clos’d as to business of consequence on Saturday. Our child who hath been dangerously ill hath so far recover’d as to admit of her removal home. We sit out thither tomorrow, where I shall remain untill the appeals about the 25th. This will be presented to you...
Your favor of the 20th. of June I have received and am happy to hear of your restoration to health. Mrs. Monroe and family are in Albemarle whither I sit out in a day or two. They are well.—The assumption of the state debts is disliked here, and will create great disgust if adopted under any shape whatever. The minds of all are made up on it, and I doubt whether even the immediate removal to...
My last from Richmond in answer to yours of the 20th. of June has no doubt been received. The more I have reflected on the subject, the better satisfied I am of the impolicy of assuming the state debts. The diminishing the necessity for State taxation will undoubtedly leave the national government more at liberty to exercise its powers and encrease the subjects on which it will act, for that...
A few days past your favor of June 11. was presented me by your relation Mr. G. Jefferson expressive of your friendly and benevolent wishes toward that young gentleman. Colo. Lewis is on a visit to Bedford, so that whatever depends on him will remain in suspense, untill his return, which will be in a few days. In the interim he will remain with me, and indeed untill he shall be comfortably...
After the most mature reflection I have at length yielded to my inclinations to suffer my name to be mention’d for a public appointment. If it takes place, unless some unpleasant reflections on probable future events should press on me, it will contribute greatly to my own and the gratification of Mrs. M. as it will place us both with and nearer our friends. But to be candid there is not that...
I wrote you a few days past in great hurry by the Albemarle post which I presume has been received. You have been able to collect from that communication that my services will be offer’d for the Senate, unless upon the information of my friends it shall appear probable they will be rejected. I gave you there a detail of circumstances relative to that business, and can only now add that as far...
Since my appointment I have not before had leasure to acknowledge the receipt of your obliging favor from Monticello. The arrangement of my business in the different courts, and other affairs, has given me full employment and detain’d me so long that it will be difficult to reach Phila. by the day appointed for the meeting of the Congress. This however I shall attempt and for this purpose sit...
I send you the letters mention’d last night, among which you will find two, from Mr. Fitzhugh and Mr. Page each, cover’d by one from the old gentleman his father recommendatory of young Mr. Mortimer. He is extremely anxious to have him admitted into your office and under your care. The young man appears to be amiable in temper and manner, sensible, prudent, and is well esteem’d among his...
I wrote you soon after my arrival here relative to the wishes and pretentions of a Mr. Mortimer, son of Dr. M. of Fredbg., to an appointment in your office. As I understood mine was accompanied with letters from Mr. Fitzhugh and Mr. Page I suppos’d an answer would have been communicated to these gentlemen. Latterly I have received several applications on that subject from the Doctor and his...
This will be presented you by Mr. Yard at present residing in this city, but lately from St. Croix, whither also he proposes shortly to return. Presuming the establishment of consuls will be extended to that Island, and being willing to accept of such appointment, he has requested me to make his pretensions known to you. His connection with Mrs. Monroe’s family has given me the pleasure of his...
Charlottesville, 29 Mch. 1791. When he left for Philadelphia last November he sought to place his brother “in a quiet good family and where he might pursue his studies to the best advantage.” From general opinion of his friends he engaged lodgings for him with James Kerr, the more so because Monroe “had render’d him services, and had a claim to his attention.” But to his astonishment he...
Your favor of the 10th. found me here upon the business mention’d in my last. I left Mrs. M. at Monticello to remain till my return. I have been here near three weeks and shall leave it tomorrow on my way back. We have gone thro’ the business, allotted to each his duty and are to meet again in Fredbg. on the 5th. of Octr. next. A part of our duty was to consolidate (when many were drawn) all...
I have been favor’d with 2 letters from you since my arrival with Paine’s pamphlet in one, and should have answer’d them sooner, but knew of your departure Eastward and of course that it would not have been sooner received. By the 25th. we shall be settled in Albemarle upon my plantation, the unfinish’d state of the buildings having prevented the removal there sooner. The appeals and general...
You will have heard that upon the discussion of G.M.’s merits, the foreign business was postponed untill tomorrow, nothing having been done respecting the Hague. The order of proceeding required that a similar question shod. have been taken respecting that court that had been as to the others. But owing I presume to the friends of the gentn. in nomination for it, being in opposition to the...
I have been requested by Mr. Dawson to make known to you his willingness to accept the office of Director of the Mint, to which bill the President has this day announced his assent. As my opinion of this Gentleman was communicated to you on a former occasion and he is known personally to you, tis not necessary that I should add any further on the subject. With the greatest respect & esteem...