You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Mitchell, John
    • Mitchell, John
  • Recipient

    • Madison, James
  • Period

    • Jefferson Presidency

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Mitchell, John" AND Author="Mitchell, John" AND Recipient="Madison, James" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency"
Results 1-30 of 57 sorted by date (descending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
Perceiving by the public prints that the Embargo is likely to be raised on the 4th. March; I have thought it likely that the interest of the U States might require Agents to be appointed & particularly in the Portuguese & Spanish posessions. Should this be the case, permitt me to solicit the favor of your granting Me an Appointment in that quarter. If no Appointments should be thought...
It is with reluctance that I intrude on you to solicit your Attention to a Business which personally concerns Me, & which I should have noticed to You When I had the pleasure of seeing you at Washington, had I not had the hope that the first Arrival from france would have brought Me information that General Armstrong had finished it; the inclosed extract of a Letter received this day shews...
From the reception I received from you at Washington, I take the Liberty to Mention to you a vacancy that has taken place in the Custom house in this City by the Death of Mr. John Shea the Collector, and to request the favor of Your recommending Me to the President to fill that office. Should I be so fortunate as to receive the Appointment, I pledge myself to Use every exertion in My power to...
I have the Honor to forward You two packets (papers) & two Letters I received from our Minister at Paris. The one under this cover, is some what soiled, haveing at the desire of Mr. Armstrong kept it constantly about me from the Moment of my being Captured. My long detention in England upwards of 2 Months, causes thees Letters to be now of old date. But no Oportunity offerd me to return for...
§ From John Mitchell. 10 April 1806, Paris. “At same time that I cover You Copy of my last of the 10th Ulto. I take the Liberty to give the substance of an article that has appeard in the journal of Commerce this day as from Hambourg —— of April 1806 ‘Yesterday the British Consul gave orders to all the Captns of Vessells of His Nation to quit the Port in 24 hours. In consequence, many saild...
§ From John Mitchell. 10 March 1806, Paris. “Since I had the Honor to Acknoledge the receit of your Letter covering Me a New Commission for the vice Agency at Havre, Nothing has passed at that port worthy of Notice, the Port continues to be blockaded by the British, and the Town abandon’d by the former Inhabitants. “I now beg leave to Notice to you a Decree of the 24 feby. imposeing a Duty of...
§ From John Mitchell. 20 January 1806, Paris. “In conformity to your instructions with My New Commission as Vice commercial Agent for Havre—I now cover you a Bond signed by my self and Mr. James Caldwell of the City of Philadelphia—as this Gentlemn. has considerable landed property in that City, it will I presume meet your approbation. “Notwithstanding my putting myself in rule, I have little...
§ From John Mitchell. 4 November 1805, Paris. “I am honord with your Circular letters of the 1st. & 4h. july last, with a Volume of the Laws; and a New Commission as Vice Commercial Agent for Havre. I have handed the Commission to His Excellency Gl. Armstrong for to Obtain My Exequatur. Agreably to your instructns, I have Advertized, that, in future no Certificate will be granted for Vessells...
§ From John Mitchell. 19 July 1805, Havre. “Since I had the honor to Write you, this port has daily diminished in Consequence, from the effect of the Blockade, Commerce has totally desert⟨e⟩;d it. “The Armed Vessells fitted out here have all saild & arrived safe at their destination, (Boulogne) not a merchant Vessell has entered, Fecamp & Dieppe are Watched with equal strictness; that, I have...
1 February 1805, Le Havre . “Since I have had the honor to Write You, this port has remain’d under a constant state of Blockade and not a Vessell suffered to enter. “But since the flotil sail’d & arrived at Boulogne, the British force has seldom exceeded one or two Ships, and in general they keep at a distance from the shore. This may possibly be owing to the Bad Weather that generally...
20 September 1804, Le Havre. “In my last I mentiond that the British frigats were stationd of[f] Fecamp & Dieppe which were declared in a State of Blockade, as are all the ports from Dunkirk to Havre—this has forced some and will probably many of our Vessells to take shelter at Cherbourg—this induced me to appoint Mr. P. V. Liais My Attorney there, I have been personally aquainted with Him for...
7 August 1804, Le Havre. “I wrote you the 3d instant to inform you of this place haveing been again Bombarded on the Evening of the 1st. & Morning of the 2nd. instant, and ’tho a great Nomber of shells were thrown, the Damage is very in considerable: from the British still Continueing in force and the frequent Attacks it is feard the intention is, to destroy the place, This has induced the...
3 August 1804, Le Havre. “Since I last had the honor of Writeing you, in which I mentiond this place being Bombarded by the British fleet, which is Composed of 7 frigats 5 Bomb vessells & 3 Cutters, and have kept the place in constant dread, On the Eveng. of the 1st. inst: about 7 oClock they began to throw Shells at the Town, which continued till Nine, with in considerable damage. Yesterday...
24 July 1804, Le Havre. “In a late Letter I mentiond to you that this port was strictly blocaded and Watched by the British; and of a fleet of Gun boats being ready to sail & in the road. The Night before last, they all returnd into port: and yesterday Morg. by 9 oClock the British fleet (13 Sail) were rainged abreast of the Town, When the forts began fireing and throwin shells—which was...
21 July 1804, Le Havre. “Since mine of the 5h. I have received the Returns from Dieppe of the Vessells enterd at that port [not found] & forward it ⅌ this Occasion. This Day the Embargo is raised and I hope the Vessells detaind at fecamp & Dieppe will be able to sail. I forward the last News papers from Paris.” RC ( DNA : RG 59, CD , Havre, vol. 1). 1 p.; docketed by Wagner as received in October.
5 July 1804, Le Havre. “I had the Honor to write you at different times from Paris. I have to inclose you the Returns [not found] of Vessells that have enterd and cleard at this place since last was made. “I am sory to observe, there is no prospect of Any Commerce being carryed on to this port from the United states so long as the War between this Country and England continues. “The Road is...
31 March 1804, Paris. Acknowledges receipt of a commission appointing him vice-commercial agent for Le Havre, “which I have handed our Minister mr. Livingston to Obtain my Exequtur: so soon as I receive it I will return to Havre.” “Mr. I. Cox Barnet to whom I have Communicated my Appointment, has writen me and also to the Minister, that, having received the offer of the Agency either for Havre...
13 March 1804, Paris. “The port of Havre continuing in State of Blockade and for some months past Without a single American Vessell—or any Business What ever doing in the Port, I have taken advantage of the moment to come here to look after some private Business (of Claims) but return in a few Days. Hearing of a Vessell sailing from Dieppe for Balto. I cover to care of Colo. Smith the last 3...
24 October 1803, Le Havre . Since his last letter, the port has been “so strictly watched that scarce any vessel has enterd.” “The Commerce of Havre is totally ruined.” U.S. ships are “deprived of the best & safest port from Cherbourg to Dunkirk, in fact, it is the only one in which vessells lay afloat or fitt for one above 200 Tons to enter.” U.S. trade will suffer, as American ships are...
Since I had the Honor to write You, our port is so strictly watched that scarce any vessell has enterd; prudence would forbid any Under the Law relative to Blockade as laid down in England. The Commerce of Havre is totally ruined, and our Vessells deprived of the best & safest port from Cherbourg to Dunkirk, in fact, it is the only one in which vessells lay afloat or fitt for one above 200...
19 August 1803, Le Havre . Encloses a copy of his last letter “stateing the situation of our vessells.” Has not yet received permission for discharging the cargoes of American vessels. “I have drawn up a petition to the Minister for Captn. Steel and Cap. Wallace, requesting permission to discharge, or leave to depart with their Cargoes, and free of Duty or charges. This Petition goes ⅌ post...
Here with you have copy of my last stateing the situation of our vessells. No permission haveing been yet obtaind for their dischargeing, I have drawn up a petition to the Minister for Captn. Steel and Cap. Wallace, requesting permission to discharge, or leave to depart with their Cargoes, and free of Duty or charges. This Petition goes ⅌ post this Day coverd to our Minister. This Day the...
14 August 1803, Le Havre . Informs JM that the ships from Lisbon that have certificates from the French commercial agent were permitted to discharge their cargoes “this Day.” RC ( DNA : RG 59, CD , Havre, vol. 1). 1 p.; docketed by Wagner. A full transcription of this document has been added to the digital edition.
I have the pleasure to inform you that the Vessells from Lisbon with Certificate of the Comml. Agent, of France have this Day permission to Discharge With Perfect Respect I am Sir Your very H Ot. Servt. The preceding is the full transcription of a document that was previously abstracted in The Papers of James Madison , Secretary of State series. The original abstract contains additional...
12 August 1803, Le Havre . Describes the effects of that “rigid measure,” the law of 1 Messidor [20 June 1803], which was “carryed into force the 10th July.” Several American ships have arrived here without certificates from the French commercial agents as required by this law. The South Carolina , Captain Steel, of New York, which carries a cargo of cotton and coffee, was permitted to land...
I now take the Liberty of addressing You, for the purpose of mentioning the rigid measure the Law passed here the first Messidor (of Which I sent you Copy) is caryed into force. July the 10th. The Ship So. Carolina Captn. Steel of NYork Arrived here from that place, with a Cargo of Cotton Coffee &c. As this vessell saild before the 1st. Messidor, there was no Certificate from the french...
24 July 1803, Le Havre . Sends returns for the last three months by vessel to Norfolk. In his last remarked on “the Heavy charge for Brokers fees.” Proposed to Barnet to “employ a person in the office for that purpose, and make a moderate Charge.” Barnet suggests waiting for the U.S. and France to make some arrangement “stipulating that the Agents shall report & clear the Vessells instead of a...
The returns for the last three Months is made out & will be forwarded ⅌ a vessell that sails for Norfolk. In my last I remarked on the Heavy charge for Brokers fees, & hoped to do it away: as I proposed to Mr Barnet, that it wd. be well to employ a person in the office for that purpose, and make a moderate Charge. He prefers waiting untill Some Arrangement is made between the two Governments...
June 1803, Le Havre . Informed JM in his last letter of 23 May that Hughes sailed in the Experiment for New York with the original of the treaty and dispatches from the U.S. ministers in Paris. This letter is carried by Jay, who bears a copy of the treaty. “The Entrance of this port is constantly watched by British ships of War.” Has heard of no American ship that has been “molested or...
My last of the 23d. May informed you of the Sailing of Mr. Hughes ⅌ the Experiment for N York with dispatches from our Minister at Paris. The Present will be handed you ⅌ Mr. Jay Who is Charged with Copy of the Treaty of Which Mr. Huges was Bearer of the Original and which I hope may Arrive after a short passage. The only inteligence I can Communicate is that the Entrance of this port is...