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    • Mitchell, John
    • Mitchell, John
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    • Madison, James
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Documents filtered by: Author="Mitchell, John" AND Author="Mitchell, John" AND Recipient="Madison, James" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency"
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Perceiving by the public prints that the Embargo is likely to be raised on the 4th. March; I have thought it likely that the interest of the U States might require Agents to be appointed & particularly in the Portuguese & Spanish posessions. Should this be the case, permitt me to solicit the favor of your granting Me an Appointment in that quarter. If no Appointments should be thought...
It is with reluctance that I intrude on you to solicit your Attention to a Business which personally concerns Me, & which I should have noticed to You When I had the pleasure of seeing you at Washington, had I not had the hope that the first Arrival from france would have brought Me information that General Armstrong had finished it; the inclosed extract of a Letter received this day shews...
From the reception I received from you at Washington, I take the Liberty to Mention to you a vacancy that has taken place in the Custom house in this City by the Death of Mr. John Shea the Collector, and to request the favor of Your recommending Me to the President to fill that office. Should I be so fortunate as to receive the Appointment, I pledge myself to Use every exertion in My power to...
I have the Honor to forward You two packets (papers) & two Letters I received from our Minister at Paris. The one under this cover, is some what soiled, haveing at the desire of Mr. Armstrong kept it constantly about me from the Moment of my being Captured. My long detention in England upwards of 2 Months, causes thees Letters to be now of old date. But no Oportunity offerd me to return for...
§ From John Mitchell. 10 April 1806, Paris. “At same time that I cover You Copy of my last of the 10th Ulto. I take the Liberty to give the substance of an article that has appeard in the journal of Commerce this day as from Hambourg —— of April 1806 ‘Yesterday the British Consul gave orders to all the Captns of Vessells of His Nation to quit the Port in 24 hours. In consequence, many saild...
§ From John Mitchell. 10 March 1806, Paris. “Since I had the Honor to Acknoledge the receit of your Letter covering Me a New Commission for the vice Agency at Havre, Nothing has passed at that port worthy of Notice, the Port continues to be blockaded by the British, and the Town abandon’d by the former Inhabitants. “I now beg leave to Notice to you a Decree of the 24 feby. imposeing a Duty of...
§ From John Mitchell. 20 January 1806, Paris. “In conformity to your instructions with My New Commission as Vice commercial Agent for Havre—I now cover you a Bond signed by my self and Mr. James Caldwell of the City of Philadelphia—as this Gentlemn. has considerable landed property in that City, it will I presume meet your approbation. “Notwithstanding my putting myself in rule, I have little...
§ From John Mitchell. 4 November 1805, Paris. “I am honord with your Circular letters of the 1st. & 4h. july last, with a Volume of the Laws; and a New Commission as Vice Commercial Agent for Havre. I have handed the Commission to His Excellency Gl. Armstrong for to Obtain My Exequatur. Agreably to your instructns, I have Advertized, that, in future no Certificate will be granted for Vessells...
§ From John Mitchell. 19 July 1805, Havre. “Since I had the honor to Write you, this port has daily diminished in Consequence, from the effect of the Blockade, Commerce has totally desert⟨e⟩;d it. “The Armed Vessells fitted out here have all saild & arrived safe at their destination, (Boulogne) not a merchant Vessell has entered, Fecamp & Dieppe are Watched with equal strictness; that, I have...
1 February 1805, Le Havre . “Since I have had the honor to Write You, this port has remain’d under a constant state of Blockade and not a Vessell suffered to enter. “But since the flotil sail’d & arrived at Boulogne, the British force has seldom exceeded one or two Ships, and in general they keep at a distance from the shore. This may possibly be owing to the Bad Weather that generally...