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Documents filtered by: Author="McHenry, James" AND Period="Confederation Period"
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I obey you. The homilies you delivered in Congress are still recollected with pleasure. The impressions they made are in favor of your integrity and no one but believes you a man of honor and republican principles. Were you ten years older and twenty thousand pounds richer, there is no doubt but that you might obtain the suffrages of Congress for the highest office in their gift. You are...
Whilst the Marquiss de la Fayette was on his late visit to this country he suggested to me that if I could recollect the train of his military proceedings and commit them to paper, that you would send them to Doctor Gordon who is engaged in writing a history of the revolution; at least so I understood him on this occasion, for the subject being delicate I did not seek explanation. My desire...
Mr. Bentelow who will have the honor to deliver you this letter is a native of France where he goes to forward some merchantile concerns. He has served with honor in our army as Captain, and is a respectable citizen of this place. It being natural for him to wish to pay his respects to the first minister of his adopted country, I have presumed to gratify so laudable a wish by presenting him to...
I have just received from L’orient by the Iris, a present from the Marquiss de la Fayette for your Excellency, of a Jack ass two mules some pheasants and partridges, which I shall after some days rest forward to your Excellency. The reason for giving you so early information is to request you send two careful servants to assist in conducting them to your seat. I imagine I must send the birds...
I received your letter by Mr Fairfax yesterday noon. The Marquiss who does nothing by halves has paid every expence incurred by his present till its arrival at this place as well as the wages and passage of their conductor, one Campion. While here the asses have been carefully attended by my own servants in my own stable, not caring to trust them to the hostler of a tavern, or from under my...
I received your letter of the 16th this evening and am extremely sorry at the loss of the French mans pocket book; but I flatter myself that your name being on the letters will be a means of recovering it. With respect to Campion the conductor of the asses he has no other claim to your consideration than as a faithful servant. I collect from himself that he is an expert swordsman, and that his...
The delegates were considering in place of the first resolution of the Virginia Plan a substitute offered by Randolph: “that a national Government ⟨ought to be established⟩ consisting of a supreme Legislative, Executive & Judiciary” ( Farrand, Records Max Farrand, ed., The Records of the Federal Convention of 1787 (4 vols.; New Haven, 1911–37). , I, 33). Mr. Madison—The motion does go to bring...
I have just received an express from Baltimore informing me that my brother lays dangerously ill, in consequence of which I set out immediately for that place. I wish to communicate this circumstance to your Excellency that it may be mentioned to the convention should my absence without leave be taken any notice of. With the greatest respect I have the honor to be your Excellency’s ob. st ALS...
Your election for members of convention being over must have furnished data by which to form an opinion of the probable fate of the constitution in your State. I wish you to favor me with a line on this subject, and whether you think an adjournment of our convention would operate with yours against its adoption. Our opposition intend to push for an adjournment under the pretext of a conference...
It has not been in my power to acknowlege the receipt of your letters of the 27 Ulto and the 8 inst. before to-day. Immediately on my return from Annapolis I sent the peas by Capn Mann with orders, if the wind would admit, to drop them at Mount Vernon, otherwise, to leave them with Col. Hoe; so that I expect they will have reached you long before this comes to hand. Campion for some time...