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On our journey hither we have fallen in with the Bearer of the Electoral votes of Georgia. They are unanimous as to the President and are all thrown away on individuals of the State as to the Vice President. The Representatives were not chosen when the Gentleman set out, but the election was to take place in a day or two after. General Matthews, he tells us will be one, Mr Baldwin another, &...
We arrived here yesterday evening where we have met with Mr Dawson just from New York. When he left it, 18 Representatives and 8 Senators had assembled. It is not certain when the deficiencies will [be] made up. The most favorable conjectures postpone it to Monday Sennight. The members attending are chiefly from the Eastward. I do not learn that a single member except Mr White is from a State...
On our arrival here we found that the number of Representatives on the spot had been stationary from the second day of the Meeting. Mr Page, Mr Lee, & myself raised it to 21. and Mr S[amuel] Griffin and Mr [Andrew] Moore have been since added. The number of attending Senators continues at 8. When a Quorum will be made up in either House, rests on vague conjecture, rather than on any precise...
The inclosed copy of Morgan’s invitation to his fellow Citizens was obtained from one of his friends, and forwarded to me from Pennsylvania. It is the most authentic & precise evidence of the Spanish project that has come to my knowledge. The instrument referred to as retained in Morgan’s hands in order to be signed by the adventurers, would still further explain the transaction. No Quorum is...
The arrival of R.H. Lee yesterday has made up a Quorum of the Senate. a Quorum in the other House was made on Wednesday last. The ballots will be opened today unless an indisposition of Mr Basset should prevent, which was not probable yesterday afternoon. The notifications to the President & Vice President will be left to the Senate. Mr Charles Thomson will be the messenger to the former. The...
It was my purpose to have dropped you a few lines from Philada but I was too much indisposed during my detention there to avail myself of that pleasure. Since my arrival here I have till now been without a fit conveyance to the post office. You will recollect the contents of a letter shewn you from Mr Innis to Mr Brown. Whilst I was in Philada I was informed by the latter who was detained...
Since my last I have been furnished with the inclosed copy of the letter from the Senators of this State to its Legislature. It is well calculated to keep alive the disaffection to the Government, and is accordingly applied to that use by the violent partizans. I understand the letter was written by the first subscriber of it, as indeed is pretty evident from the stile and strain of it. The...
After being detained 8 or 10 days beyond the intended commencement of my Journey, by the critical illness of my mother, I am now subjected to a further delay by an attack on my own health. A slight complaint in my bowels which I first felt on the day of my arrival here (friday last) very suddenly took the form of a pretty severe dysentery. With the aid of Doctr Stuart who has been good eno’ to...
“The act for establishing the temporary and permanent seats of the Government of the U. States” requires the following steps for carrying the latter into effect. 1. The appointment of three Commissioners of sufficient respectability having good will to the general object without any particular bias of private interest residing (a majority at least) so conveniently to the scene of business as...
Copy of a paper made out & sent to the President at his request, to be ready in case his judgment should finally decide agst the Bill for incorporating a National Bank, the Bill being there before him. Gentlemen of the Senate Having carefully examined and maturely considered the Bill entitled, “An Act I am compelled by the conviction of my judgment and the duty of my Station to return the Bill...
Substance of a Conversation with the President In consequence of a note this morning from the President requesting me to call on him I did so; when he opened the conversation by observing that having some time ago communicated to me his intention of retiring from public life on the expiration of his four years, he wished to advise with me on the mode and time most proper for making known that...
Having been left to myself, for some days past, I have made use of the opportunity for bestowing on your letter of the 20th Ult: handed to me on the road, the attention which its important contents claimed. The questions which it presents for consideration are 1. at what time a notification of your purpose to retire will be most convenient. 2 what mode will be most eligible. 3 whether a...
The period which will close the appointment with which my fellow citizens have honoured me, being not very distant, and the time actually arrived, at which their thoughts must be designating the citizen who is to administer the Executive Government of the United States during the ensuing term, it may conduce to a more distinct expression of the public voice, that I should apprize such of my...
Mr Madison presents his respectful compliments to the President, and informs him that Mr Johnson⟨,⟩ the candidate for the light-house appointment, having left the City yesterday morning, it cannot now be ascertained how far he is apprised of the limited provision annexed to the place. AL , DNA : RG 59, Miscellaneous Letters. For background on John Waller Johnston’s unsuccessful attempts to...
Your letter of the 14th instant did not arrive till sunday night, and being not then at home, I did not receive it till last night. I now lose not a moment in complying with its request; tho’ I foresee it cannot reach you before you will have left Mount Vernon, and before you will probably have made up a final determination on some if not on all the questions proposed. These are 1. Ought the...
Mr Madison presents his respectful compliments to the President, and begs leave to lay before him the inclosed letters, on behalf of a candidate for a vacancy in the Custom-House Department in Virginia. Mr M. being a perfect stranger to the candidate can add no information whatever of his own. He knows Mr Maury well, and considers his recommendation as respectable. AL , DLC:GW . On the reason...
Mr Madison presents his respectful compliments to the President of the United States, with a letter from Arthur Cambell Esqr. which an accompanying letter to Mr M. requests him to deliver to the President. Mr Cambell makes a further request of Mr M. to make any explanations that may be necessary. Mr M. is not sensible that he possesses any local or other knowledge that can elucidate the...
J. Madison presents his respectful compliments to the President & returns the Treatise on small Canals &c., with his acknowledgments for the perusal of it. He is not enough conversant with such subjects to decide on the merits of the various plans & machinery recommended by the Author. In general his principles appear to be both effective & practicable; but the question of their utility must...
Mr Madison presents his respectful compliments to the President, and begs to mention the wish of Joseph Nevil Esqr. (late a member of the House of Representatives) to be taken into consideration in the appointment of Surveyor, under the law for the sale of lands N. West of the Ohio. He takes the liberty also of inclosing a Letter from General Posey, expressing his wishes with respect to an...
We received this morning a letter subscribed by Peter Thornton informing us that he is the son of a gentleman in Virginia, that he lately made his escape from N. York and is now detained by your Excellency till some testimony shall be given by the Delegates from Virga in his favor. Although we are total strangers to the youth, and are very imperfectly informed of his case yet as we have us...
Amidst the Acclamations of Multitudes contending who shall applaud you most, accept, Sir, from us, that Tribute of Respect & Gratitude, in which none withhold but those who are your Enemies, only because they are Enemies to the Deliverer of their Country, and to the Friend of Mankind. We rejoice with you upon the Reduction of York: a Success, which all ascribe to wise Counsel, prudent Conduct,...
I have been honored with your Excellency’s favor of the 22d inst: bearing testimony to the merits & talents of Mr McHenry. The character which I had preconceived of this gentleman was precisely that which your representation has confirmed. As Congress have not yet fixed the peace establishment for their foreign affairs and will not probably fill up vacancies unless there be some critical...
113Commonplace Book, 1759–1772 (Madison Papers)
This manuscript volume is in part a copybook and in part a notebook, all written by JM in his youth with the exception of the final six lines. On the one hand, there are nearly accurate transcriptions of poetry from two magazines, and, on the other, notes upon selections from three fairly difficult books, supplemented by JM’s comments and other interpolations. At the top of the first page of...
MS ( LC : Madison Miscellany). One hundred and twenty-two pages of this copybook are filled with writing in JM’s youthful hand. They are preceded by four almost blank pages and followed by fourteen others devoted to the drawings described in the editorial note below. JM’s great-nephew, James Madison Cutts II, gave this manuscript to the Library of Congress in 1881. On the manuscript’s...
I am not a little affected at hearing of your misfortune, but cannot but hope the cure may be so far accomplished as to render your journey not inconvenient. Your kind Advice & friendly cautions are a favour that shall be always gratefully remembered, & I must beg leave to assure you that my happiness, which you and your brother so ardently wish for, will be greatly augmented by both your...
I recieved your letter by Mr. Rosekrans, and wrote an Answer; but as it is probable this will arrive sooner which I now write by Doctor Witherspoon, I shall repeat some circumstances to avoid obscurity. On Wednesday last we had the annual commencement. Eighteen young gentlemen took their Batchelors’ degrees, and a considerable number their Masters Degrees; the Degree of Doctor of Law was...
Recievd of Mr. Richard Patterson by order of Mr. Adam Hoops twenty two Shillings and six pence on acct. of Mr. Robert Patterson. Richard Paterson’s mercantile establishment in Princeton, situated on Main Street next to the well-known tavern of Jacob Hyer at the sign of Hudibras, appears to have had an important place in the life of the college. Paterson (d. 1781) was the father of William...
Mr. Richard Patterson Please to let the bearer Mr. Wm. Livingston have fifteen Shillings on acct of your Obliged Humble Servant The date was written over by JM. He may have intended it to be “April 1.” On the back of this draft is the endorsement: “Received this 4 of April 1770 of Richd. Paterson the sum of fifeteen shillings on Acct. of James Madison by me. William S. Livingston.”...
I reciev’d yours dated June 4th. & have applied to Mr. Hoops as you directed; he says you must suit yourself in paying him, & if you should let him have a bill of Exchange it must be on your own terms: Forty Pounds £40. New Jersey Currency is the Sum I shall have of him before I get home. my frugality has not been able to keep it below that, consistant with my staying here to the best...
MS ( LC : Madison Papers). With the exception of the extracts from Proverbs, these notes are quoted verbatim, or almost verbatim, from William Burkitt, Expository Notes, with Practical Observations, on the New Testament of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ , first printed posthumously in London in 1724. The pagination of the editorial footnotes is taken from the sixteenth edition of this work,...