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Your favour of came to hand by the mail of Wednesday. I did not write by several late returns for two reasons; one the improbability of [your] having got back to Mount Vernon; the other a bilious indisposition which confined me for some days. I am again tolerably well recovered. Appearances at present are less favorable than at the date of my last. Our progress is slow and every advantage is...
I am tolerably well over the bilious indisposition which confined me at the date of my last. The progress of the Convention is extremely slow; though from the impatience of the members, I think the Session will not be long. The issue of it is more doubtful than was apprehended when I last wrote. The ostensible points of opposition are direct taxation, the imperfect representation in the H. of...
Your favour of came to hand by the mail of Wednesday. I did not write by several late returns for two reasons; one the improbability of having got back to Mount Vernon; the other a bilious indisposition which confined me for some days. I am again tolerably well recovered. Appearances at present are less favorable than at the date of my last. Our progress is slow and every advantage is taken of...
Henry asked for information from those delegates who had served in Congress when a treaty with Spain covering navigation rights on the Mississippi had been debated. Henry Lee, Monroe, and Grayson spoke ahead of JM. Mr. Madison . Mr. Chairman—It is extremely disagreeable to me to enter into this discussion, as it is foreign to the object of our deliberations here, and may, in the opinion of...
Letter not found. 13 June 1788 . Acknowledged in Carrington to JM, 25 June 1788 . Apparently reports that the Federalists’ prospects at the Richmond convention depend upon favorable votes within the Kentucky delegation.
Letter not found. 13 June 1788 . Mentioned in Hamilton to JM, 25 June 1788 . Describes the critical outlook for ratification of the Constitution at the Richmond convention.
After Sections 4 and 5 of Article I were read, Monroe asked why the regulation of elections for members of Congress was under the “ultimate controul” of the national legislature, “and also why there was an exception as to the place of electing senators” ( Robertson, Virginia Debates David Robertson, Debates and Other Proceedings of the Convention of Virginia (2d ed.; Richmond, 1805). , p....
Henry complained that Article I, Section 6, was dangerous in allowing members of Congress to fix their own salaries and to be appointed to federal offices. Mr. Madison . Mr. Chairman—I most sincerely wish to give a proper explanation on this subject, in such a manner as may be to the satisfaction of every one. I shall suggest such considerations as led the convention to approve of this clause....
Mr. Madison . Mr. Chairman—The honorable gentleman has laid much stress on the maxim, that the purse and sword ought not to be put in the same hands; with a view of pointing out the impropriety of vesting this power in the general government. But it is totally inapplicable to this question. What is the meaning of this maxim? Does it mean that the sword and purse ought not to be trusted in the...
Yours of the 8th. is just come to hand. I mentioned in my last that Oswald had been here in consultation with the Antifedl. leaders. The contents of your letter confirm the idea that a negotiation for delay is [on] foot between the opposition here & with you. We have conjectured for some days that the policy is to spin out the Session in order to receive overtures from your Convention; or if...