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    • Madison, James
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    • Pinkney, William

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10 May 1802, Department of State. “Your Letter of february 17th. with the Documents annexed were duly received and laid before the President, who was pleased in consequence of your representation, to direct a Letter to be written to Mr. Cabot of which a Copy is enclosed. By Mr. Cabots answer, I find that he proposes to comply with your summons to resume the functions of assessor to your board,...
Enclosed is a power enabling you to negotiate the transfer of the Maryland bank stock. The communications from Govr. Mercer which you will receive herewith will put you in possession of other explanations of the views of the State. You are too well acquainted with the subject to render many general observations requisite on my part. It will be sufficient to remark, that such has been the delay...
The Legislature of Maryland at their last session authorised the Governor to take measures in concurrence with the Executive of the United States to obtain restitution of the Bank Stock, which has been long a subject both of civil process and negotiation in London. As Mr. King will probably have left England before a communication on this subject could reach him, and as his successor may not...
In pursuance of a request made by Governor Mercer to the President, I have the honor to enclose certain communications to you from the former, on the subject of the Maryland Bank Stock, and to signify the desire of the President that the views of the state of Maryland in this case may be pursued, as they are explained by its Executive. I am &c. Letterbook copy and letterbook copy of enclosures...
16 November 1804, Department of State. “I have had the honor to receive in due time your letter of the 3rd. inst. with its enclosures, containing the explanations and details you deemed proper respecting the progress and termination of the affair of the Maryland Bank Stock in England confided in the last year to your management. Having laid these documents before the President, I am charged to...
I have the honor to make known to you that by a nomination of the President with the concurrence of the Senate you are united with Mr Monroe in a Commission Plenipotentiary and Extraordinary “for settling all matters of difference between the United States and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, relative to wrongs committed between the parties on the high seas, or other waters,...
I herewith inclose a Commission and letters of Credence authorizing you to treat with the British Government concerning the maritime wrongs which have been committed, and the regulation of Commerce and navigation, between the parties. Your authority is made several as well as joint, as a provision for any contingency depriving either of the co-operation of the other. The importance of the...
You will receive from the Bearer Mr. Forrest the public despatches for yourself & Mr. Monroe, with sundry letters & packets accompanying them. In a letter to Mr. Monroe which is unsealed, you will see the footing on which your eventual succession to a vacancy in the legation at London is placed. No letter has been recd. from Mr. Monroe, nor from Paris ⟨s⟩ince you left Washington. Mr. Forrest...
Under the 3d Article of the Treaty of 1794, as it has been expounded, Indian Traders on each side have a right to resort to and trade with the Tribes within the limits of the other party; with an exception of the Country covered by the charter of the Hudson’s Bay company. This article is found in its operation to be very seriously detrimental to the United States. 1st It gives to the British...
Since the date of my last (May 30) I have obtained from the Secretary at War, the inclosed copies of a correspondence between an Officer of the United States and an Agent of the British North West Company for the Indian trade. The correspondence may be of use in explaining the inconveniencies resulting from the constructive permission given by the Treaty of 1794, to British traders, to carry...
The enclosed papers, respecting the practices of British traders with the Indians, to instigate them against the United States, were received through General Wilkinson. They exemplify so strikingly the inconvenience of the intercourse with the Indians as it is now established by the treaty, that I have thought them a necessary supplement to my letter of the 30 May last. I have the honor to be,...
The enclosed Sketch, from the pen of Mr. Crowninshield, contains such pertinent and valuable information respecting the trade to India, as to induce an attempt, though late, to convey it to you. I have the honor to be, Gentlemen, with great respect & consideration, Your most obed. Servt. DLC .
terms precarious, and merchants know not what articles will be admitted into the Islands from day to day. never open in war more than 6. months & then only for articles of first necessity. If goods not admitted permission to carry them away all american articles to be admit ted Flour, fish, corn, tobo. boards plank timbers, Staves, shingles, heading, beef, pork, dried & pickled fish, beans...
Your dispatch of the 11th. of Sepr. has been duly received. Altho’ the tenor of the discussions which it recites does not exhibit on the part of the British Commissioners the readiness in yielding to the justice of our claims and to the energy of your statements, which might be wished, yet the general spirit of conciliation with which they profess and appear to have met you, cherishes a hope...
You will have seen by my letter of the 6th. inst. which went by Sundry conveyances, that the bill Suspending the non-intercourse act had passed the House of Representatives. I now enclose it in the form of a law, with an amendment providing for a further Suspension by the Executive in case the State of things between the two countries Should require it. In the Senate the vote for the Bill was...
The President having this day coplied with the recommendation in your letter of Septr. 12. by a special message to Congress on the subject of the non-importation act of the last Session, I lose not a moment in forwarding to Mr. Merry’s care the inclosed copy. Hoping that it will either find him still at Alexandria, or overtake him before the Vessel gets out of reach. I remain with great...
The detention of the Leonidas enables me to inclose a copy of the bill suspending the non-importation act of the last session; as it was passed by the House of Representatives this day with only five dissenting voices. In the object the House is supposed to have been unanimous, the difference of opinion being produced by a disagreement about the time to which the suspension should be limitted....
You will have seen by my letter of the 6th. which went by sundry other conveyances, that the Bill suspending the non importation act had passed the House of Representatives. I now inclose it in the form of a law, with an amendment providing for a further suspension by the Executive in case the state of things between the two Countries should require it. In the Senate the vote for the Bill was...
The triplicate of your communication of Novr. llth. has just been received. Those of Sepr. l2, had been previously received in due time. The turn which the negotiation has taken, was not expected, and excites as much of regret as of disappointment. The conciliatory spirit manifested on both sides, with the apparent consistency of the interest of Great Britain, with the right of the American...
Your dispatch of Jany. 3d. with the Treaty signed Decr 31 with the British Commissioners, were safely delivered on the 15th. inst. Your letter of Decr. 27, notifying the approach of that event, had been previously received, in time to be included in a communication of the President to Congress then in Session. A copy of the instrument in its actual form, with the declaration of the British...
My letter of March 18th. acknowledged the receipt of your dispatches and of the Treaty signed on the 31st. of December, of which Mr Purviance was the bearer, and signified that the sentiments and views of the President formed on the actual posture of our affairs with Great Britain, would without any needless delay, be communicated. The subject is accordingly resumed, in this dispatch, with...
Your letter of April 25th. inclosing the British project of a Convention of limits, and your proposed amendments, has been duly received. The following observations explain the terms on which the President authorizes you to close and sign the instrument. lst. The modification of the 5th. Art. (noted as one which the British Commissioners would have agreed to) may be admitted, in case that...
I rcd. a few days ago your favor of Aug. 13. and have submitted to the President your anticipation of an outfit on the special grounds which were supposed to warrant it. He acquiesces in the reasonableness of the measure; with the reservation which you suggest, of an eventual reimbursement of the sums drawn, in case the legal title to an outfit should from any cause not be consummated. I thank...
Mr. Erskine having been so good as to let me know, that the Mail of this evening will carry his dispatches for a British packet, which will sail from New York immediately on their arrival there, and other conveyances now failing, I avail myself of the opportunity to inclose you a copy of a message from the President to Congress, and their act in pursuance of it, laying an immediate embargo on...
A vessel having been engaged to carry from the Port of New York public dispatches and mercantile letters to Europe; I avail myself of the opportunity of forwarding you a series of Gazettes, which contain the proceedings of Congress, and such current information, as will give you a view of our internal affairs. They will be put, with this letter, into the hands of Mr Nourse, a passenger in the...
Having just learnt that the present Mail will arrive at New York in time for the British packet, I avail myself of the opportunity of forwarding your Commission and letters of credence, as successor to Mr Monroe, in the Legation at London. Since my last which went by Mr Nourse in a dispatch vessel bound first to L’Orient and then to Falmouth, I have received your communications of the 23 Novr...
I ought to have acknowledged your favour of Decr. 7. by the B. packet which conveyed an acknowledgment of your public letters. It was made impossible however by the state of my health. I have since had the pleasure of your two private letters of the 21st. of Decr. & 24th. of Jany. I thank you much for those valuable marks of your attention, and for the sundry printed articles to which it has...
My last bore date the 8th. instant and went by the British Packet. It acknowledged your letters of Novr. 23d. and of Decr. I have since received those referred to in the latter, and also that of Jany 26th. which came to hand last evening. I now inclose the promised sequel of the correspondence here with Mr Rose by which you will see the posture finally given to the subject of his Mission. The...
Since my last of Mar. 21. by Mr. Rose, I have had the pleasure of your two letters of Decr. 21 & Jany. 24. That of Decr. 10. has also been recd. These favors have been accompanied by packets of Newspapers and the several pamphlets following. 1. Exposition of British orders in Council 2. Notifications orders &ca 3. Orders in Council. Examination of &c. (Brougham) 4. Roscoe’s pamphlet 5. Lowe’s...
My last was of March 22d., and went under the care of Mr Rose. I now forward printed copies of the correspondence with him on the subject of his mission, and of the antecedent documents relating to the case of the Chesapeake. As soon as the voluminous residue of the communications made to Congress issues from the press, it shall also be forwarded. You will find that they include certain...
I avail myself of the last moment of the opportunity to inclose you a copy of the Resolution which I understand will be proposed this day in the House of Reps. on the subject of the Act laying An Embargo. I think it probable that some such provision will be made, for its suspension during a recess, and that the Session will then be hastened to a conclusion. There is not the slightest...
The writer of the letter (Mr. Keas Plimpton of Massacts.) of which a copy is inclosed, has just been informed that your interposition would be requested by this Department, as far as it might be proper, in his case, and he has been advised accordingly to send his documents to you. Will you therefore be so good as to take or direct such measures in relation to the case as you may deem useful...
My last was of the 4th. inst, and went by a British packet from New York. I now forward a copy of it. Congress ended their Session on the night of the 25 inst. The series of newspapers, herewith sent, affords a view of their proceedings subsequent to the communications last made to you. Some other prints are included which throw light on the workings of public opinion and the State of public...
For the private letters with which I have been favored I refer to the general list in my public letter by this conveyance which includes them. The printed inclosures were all safely brought to hand also. This with the public dispatches will be handed you by Mr. Purviance who takes his passage in a vessel from Baltimore engaged for the like purposes with the Osage from N.Y. and which is to...
The papers herewith inclosed will authenticate and explain a very flagrant instance of the lawless proceedings of British Naval Commanders. You will be pleased by a proper representation of it, to afford the British Government another proof of the necessity of an exemplary interposition, if it means to do justice either to the United States, or to itself. I have the Honor to be, with great...
You will receive by the present conveyance a continuation of certain Newspapers &c. from which you will be able to collect a tolerable idea of the actual posture of our internal affairs. Notwithstanding the various modes resorted to for discrediting and frustrating the Embargo, it retains a solid support in the judgment and patriotic pride of the great body of the nation. Massachussetts is the...
Finding that the departure of the Packet has been from time to time postponed, I have caused a transmission of newspapers to Mr. Nielson, to be continued down to this date which I understand affords the last opportunity. Lt. Lewis arrived here with the dispatches committed to him, on the 8th. The adherence of the B. Govt. to their orders, and its silence as to the affair of the Chesapke., are...
Your communications by Lt. Lewis were safely delivered on the evening of the 8th. inst. As it had been calculated that the inte r val between the return of Mr Rose and the departure of L t. Lewis would give sufficient time to the British Governmen t to decide on the course required by the posture in whic h the affair of the Chesapeake was left, its silence to yo u on that subject, could not...
I have little to add to my private letter of the 15th. by the B. Packet, a copy of which is inclosed. Great efforts have been made to render the Embargo unpopular, and to prosecute evasions & violations of it. These efforts have not ceased & have not been without a certain degree of effect. With the means used by our own Citizens have been united great exertions from the Canadian & N. Scotia...
The St. Michael having not yet returned with the result of the communications you will have received by her, I have nothing particularly to add on our affairs with Great Britain. The intimation in your private letter of June 29 very lately received, gives us hopes that the British Government was becoming more sensible of what was due to its own nation as well as to us. It is anxiously wished...
Having written from my home in Virginia the official letter of this date, I have been less full than I might have been with all your letters in the affair by me. The case may be the same with this private one. Your letter of the 29. June flatters our expectation much, from the return of the St. Michael. The success with which the opponents of the administration, have misrepresented the causes...
I think it not improbable that this may not reach N. Y. in time for the Packet; but I take the chance of the oppy. to forward a few of the late prints which will be consigned to the care of Mr. Boggs who will be a passenger in the Packet. I take the liberty of adding that he is recommended to me as a gentleman equally respectable in his character & his connections, and of course equally...
I find by the receipt of your last private letter by Mr. Atwater, that there has been no miscarriage of any preceding one. The conduct of the B cabinet in rejecting the fair offer made to it, and even sneering at the course pursued by the U. S. proves at once a very determined enmity to them, and a confidence that events were taking place here which would relieve it from the necessity of...
I inclose herewith a copy of the Presidents Message yesterday delivered to Congress, and will forward by the next opportunity printed copies of the documents communicated along with it. These will consist principally of such portions of the correspondencies relating to the French and British Edicts, including your letter of Augt. 23d to. Mr Canning, & his answer of Sept 23, as were deemed not...
Finding that Mr. Erskine detains the packet a day longer, I add a line to my private letter of yesterday. The communications made to Congs. have it would seem, kindled all the indignation which was to be expected. The paternal solicitude of H. B. M. for the sufferings of the people here under the Embargo, was recd. with ridicule & contempt. The repetition of the paragraph was called for with a...
The inclosed papers have been made out, and are now sent to you with a view of putting you in possession of the facts relating to a case alluded to by Mr. Canning in a late conversation with you, and which he then seemed to think important. Time does not permit me to send you copies of Mr Erskine’s letters to me on this subject; my answer however, of which a copy is inclosed will inform you on...
I forwarded to you by the British Packet which sailed from New York on the 17th. instant, the message of the President, with such of the documents communicated to congress as had then been printed. I now add, by a vessel which is to sail from Boston to Liverpool, such of the debates and proceedings of Congress as have since taken place. Among these will be found a very interesting report made...
I wrote two short private letters by the British Packet, which sailed from N. York on the 17th. They were accompanied by sundry printed documents and newspapers. You will now receive a continuation of them with a few additional copies of the Documents. Among the papers now forwarded are a number of copies of a Report on our foreign Relations made to the H. of Reps. by a Committee on that...
My two last letters were of Novr. 9. & 25. The first went by a British Packet from New York; the second by a vessel which has sailed or is about sailing from Boston. This will be forwarded to New York to be conveyed by a Packet which is to sail on the 8th. It is accompanied by a continuation of the debates and proceedings of Congress as far as they have yet appeared in print. You will find...
I have little to add to the printed information accompanying my official letter of this date. Congs. seemed to be sufficiently determined, as you will observe, to resist the unjust and insulting Edicts of the Belligerents; and differ only as to the mode best suited to the case. The disposition to prefer war to the course hitherto pursued, is rather gaining than losing ground, and is even...