James Madison Papers
Documents filtered by: Author="Madison, James" AND Recipient="Madison, James, Sr." AND Period="Revolutionary War"
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From James Madison to James Madison, Sr., 25 June 1779

To James Madison, Sr.

RC (LC: Madison Papers).

Williamsbg June 25th. 1779

Hond Sir

I have recd. from Mr. Hunter1 £2000. I shall not put it into the loan office as it is does not appear that Certificates will be taken in payment for land.2 I have applied to Col Zane3 on the subject of Iron, but can not get a positive promise. He has taken a Mem. and says he will write to you immediately on his return home. I was sorry to find the Horse you sent me in such meagre plight. The dry weather has so much injured the pasturage that I am obliged to be at some little expence in forage. This with the sickliness of the place and season will induce me to come up as soon as possible. I can not yet determine the time, but suppose it will be between the 10 & last of next Month. I send by Majr Moore4 the last Newspapers & refer you to him for an acct. of the public proceedings.

With great affection I remain Yr. Dutiful son

James Madison Junr

1Most probably James Hunter, Jr. (1746–1788), a Fredericksburg merchant with whom the Madisons had many business dealings (R. Walter Coakley, “The Two James Hunters of Fredericksburg, Patriots among the Virginia Scotch Merchants,” Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, LVI [1948], 3–21).

2The Assembly of Virginia established a loan office in Williamsburg in June 1777. Any citizen might lend $200 or more through this office to the Continental Congress and receive in return a loan certificate bearing 6 per cent annual interest and maturing after three years (Journal of the House of Delegates description begins Journal of the House of Delegates of the Commonwealth of Virginia; Begun and Held At the Capitol, in the City of Williamsburg. Beginning in 1780, the portion after the semicolon reads, Begun and Held in the Town of Richmond. In the County of Henrico. The Journal for each session has its own title page and is individually paginated. The edition used, unless otherwise noted, is the one in which the journals for 1777–1781 are brought together in one volume, with each journal published in Richmond in 1827 or 1828, and often called the “Thomas W. White reprint.” description ends , May 1777, p. 112; Hening, Statutes description begins William Waller Hening, ed., The Statutes at Large; being a Collection of all the Laws of Virginia, from the First Session of the Legislature, in the Year 1619 (13 vols.; Richmond and Philadelphia, 1819–23). description ends , IX, 283–85). By an act of 6 December 1779, the loan certificates, which were to mature on 1 March 1780, were made acceptable in payment for such public lands of Virginia as were for sale (Journal of the House of Delegates description begins Journal of the House of Delegates of the Commonwealth of Virginia; Begun and Held At the Capitol, in the City of Williamsburg. Beginning in 1780, the portion after the semicolon reads, Begun and Held in the Town of Richmond. In the County of Henrico. The Journal for each session has its own title page and is individually paginated. The edition used, unless otherwise noted, is the one in which the journals for 1777–1781 are brought together in one volume, with each journal published in Richmond in 1827 or 1828, and often called the “Thomas W. White reprint.” description ends , October 1779, p. 80; Hening, Statutes description begins William Waller Hening, ed., The Statutes at Large; being a Collection of all the Laws of Virginia, from the First Session of the Legislature, in the Year 1619 (13 vols.; Richmond and Philadelphia, 1819–23). description ends , X, 148).

3Isaac Zane, Jr.

4The Virginia Assembly adjourned on 26 June 1779. William Moore, a member of the House of Delegates, was evidently returning to his home in Orange County.

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