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Altho’ I feel reluctance in trespassing for a moment on the repose to which you have just retired, I can not well avoid inclosing a letter from Mr. La Trobe which he wishes may be seen by you before it be decided on, because he thinks you have already acquiesc’d in the reasonableness of its object: and which I wish you to see, because I am so raw on the whole subject, as to need any...
Altho’ the letter from Mr. Brown was probably intended for you, I could not hesitate in carrying it into effect; and finding that the Bill on the Navy Dept. will be paid, I inclose, in order to avoid the delay of a week, the sum drawn for in Bank notes. I send them to you rather than directly to Mrs. T. first because I do not know what the direct address ought to be, & 2dly. because it is...
I have yours of the 24. The enquiry as to Franzoni will be made as soon as an oppy. offers. F. Page had been appd. before your letter was recd. & his Commission forwarded. We have letters from Erving to Jany. 28. He was at Cadiz, intending it appears to adhere to the Junta Suprema, till the drama should close, and then leave Spain, by way of Gibralter, Tangier, or England, if no other course...
I return the letter of Mazzei, without however having ascertained the fact as to the remittance by the Sculptor. Latrobe I presume, will give the information in his answer to the letter which I have forwarded to him. He is now in Philada. A Secretary of Legation with a sort of Extra establishment has just arrived from England, with despatches for Erskine. I have a private letter only from...
I have recd. your favor of the 19th. You will see in the newspapers the result of the Advances made by G. B. Attempts were made to give shapes to the arrangement implying inconsistency and blame on our part. They were however met in a proper manner & readily abandoned; leaving these charges in their full force, as they now bear on the other side. The B. Cabinet must have changed its course...
I am just favored with yours of the 27th. Young Gelston is here preparing to take his passage for France as bearer and expositor of dispatches, in the Syren sloop of war which is waiting for him at Baltimore. He leaves this tomorrow morning. Mr. Gallatin has had a conversation with Turreau at his residence near Baltimore. He professes to be confident that his Govt. will consider England as...
Your favor of the 22d. did not come to hand till the day before yesterday. It will give me pleasure to take the place of Mr. Barnes in the note to the Bank; the more so as it will, it seems, be a relief to the Old Gentleman’s pecuniary anxieties. I will have an early communication with him on the subject. I wish the original arrangement had taken the shape now proposed, and hope that you will...
The Pacific has just returned from G. B. bringing the accts. to be seen in the Newspapers. The communications from Pinkney add little to them. The new orders, considering the time, and that the act was known on the passage of which the instructions lately executed by Erskine, were predicated, present a curious feature in the conduct of the B Cabinet. It is explained by some at the expence of...
Yours of the 16th. came to hand yesterday. I hope you have not made any sacrifice of any sort to the scruple which has superseded my arrangemt. with Mr. Barnes. The execution of it would have equally accorded with my disposition & my conveniency. The Gazette of yesterday contains the mode pursued for re-animating confidence in the pledge of the B. Govt. given by Mr. Erskine in his arrangemt....
I have recd. a private letter of Mar. 30. from Genl. Armstrong, in which he desires me “to present him most respectfully and cordially to you, and inform you that by the next public ship that goes to America, he shall have the pleasure to send you, an alteration of Mr. Guillaumes’ plough, which in light soils, is a great improvement upon the old one.” To me he adds, “By the same vessel I...
The inclosed letter accompanied the skin of an Animal, not named by the writer, which belongs to the Region of the Rocky Mountains. The bundle being too large for the Mail, I shall forward it by some other oppy; perhaps as far as Orange, by a waggon I shall soon have on the return thither. You will have seen that a re-nomination of J. Q. A. for Russia, has succeeded with the Senate. In framing...
The inclosed letter from Mr. S. came under cover to me. It was brought by the vessel lately arrived at Phila. from Dunkirk. It appears that he had not left Paris, for Petersbg: nor meant to do so, untill he shd. hear further from the U. S; as he has probably explained to you. Mr. Coles had rea[c]hed Paris; but in the absence of the French Court, nothing could be said very interesting on the...
On my arrival at O. C. House on thursday I found your favor of the 12th. inst: with the document expected, & the letters from Short & Warden inclosed. The whole are now returned. No copy of the document was in the Office of State, as you suppose must have been the case. This was owing to the letter being written by your own hand at Monticello, and being sent on to Mr. S. without being opened...
Herewith you will receive a packet, which being wrapt up in a large one for me, from the Dept. of State, was taken out of the mail of yesterday, and not observed before the rider had set out. I find myself under the mortifying necessity of setting out tomorrow morning for Washington. The intricate state of our affairs with England produced by the mixture of fraud & folly in her late conduct,...
I got home from my trip to Washington on Saturday last; having remained there three days only. You will have seen in the Procln. issued, the result of our consultations on the effect of what has passed on our commercial relations with G. B. The enforcement of the non-intercourse act agst. her, will probably be criticized by some friends and generally assailed by our adversaries, on the ground...
Mr. & Mrs. Gallatin reached us on saturday last; and in fulfilment of their promise to you propose to set out for Monticello, tomorrow morning. We are preparing to accompany them. I see by the papers that Mr Smith has probably recd. dispatches from Mr. Pinkney, by a late arrival; but being in Baltimore, I have not yet heard from him on the subject. The newspaper dates from London were not...
I send herewith a few papers which have come to my hands along with those addressed to myself. Jackson according to a note sent from Annapolis to Mr. Smith was to be in Washington on friday evening last. The letters from Mr. Pinkney brought by him, were dated June 23. and merely rehearsed a conversation with Canning; from which it would seem, that C. readily admitted that his second condition...
I inclose for perusal a letter from Mr. Dupont D. N. What does he mean by his desire “to contribute” to the Execution of his project of Education? You will observe that he has sent for you a copy of the Works of Turgot, as far as Edited. Be so good as to point out the mode in which you wish them to be transmitted. I expect a Waggon here next month which can take them to Orange, if you prefer...
Letter not found. 13 October 1809. Acknowledged in Jefferson to JM, 25 Oct. 1809 . Listed in Jefferson’s Epistolary Record (DLC: Jefferson Papers) as received in Richmond on 20 Oct. Encloses a check on the Bank of Norfolk.
In the operation of removing from my former quarters, the Digest of the City Code & business, which you had been so good as to furnish me, has, by some unaccountable accident, been either lost, or possibly so thrown out of place, as not to be found. I have written to Capt: Coles, to take Monticello in his way, and ask the favor of you to permit him to take another copy, from your Original. As...
I recd. your letter from Eppington. I had not heard that either the Attorney Genl. or the Govr. of Illinois meant to resign. Inclosed are several letters for you recd. from France by the return of the Wasp. You will see the propriety of my adding one to myself from Mr. Short; to be returned after perusal. Our information from Paris, of the 19th. of Sepr. gives no countenance to the rumoured...
A gentleman of intelligence & good standing in Kentuckey lately signified to a friend here, that he was much in conversation with Col. Monroe during his trip to that country, and that Sentiments which were repeatedly dropped by him, left no doubt, that altho’ he de[c]lined a more important Station at N. O. he would not object to the vacancy produced by the death of Govr. Lewis, which would...
I duly recd: your two letters of the 26. & 30. Ult. The State of Col. Monroe’s mind is very nearly what I had supposed. His willingness to have taken a seat in the Cabinet, is what I had not supposed. I have written to Majr. Neele, according to your suggestion, and shall follow it also as to the distribution of Govr. Lewis’s papers when they arrive. Fayette in a letter to me has been equally...
Yours of the 25th. Mar: has been duly recd. Every thing is so uncertain at this moment with respect to our approaching relations to France & G. B: that I can only say that a conveyance of your plow to the Former will be favored as much as possible, and that I will endeavor to have more definite information on the subject ready at Monticello for your return from Bedford. I am glad to learn that...
Yours of the 16th. has been recd. It is not improbable that there will be an early occasion to send for public purposes, a ship to G. B. & France; & that Norfolk will be the port of Departure. I recommend therefore that your plow be lodged there as soon as may be, with the proper instructions to your Agent. It may not be amiss to include in them a discretion to forward the plow to any other...
The inclosed letter from Jarvis accompanied one to me on the subject of the Merinos. I learn that they have arrived safe; but the vessel is aground a few miles below Alexanda. Jos: Doherty is gone to bring them up, making the selections warranted by Mr. Jarvis. As the means I shall employ to have my pair conveyed to Virga. will suffice for yours, it will be unnecessary for you to attend to the...
I have duly recd. your favor of the 13th. The general idea of disposing of the supernumerary Merino Rams for the public benefit had occurred to me. The mode you propose for the purpose seems well calculated for it. But as it will be most proper as you suggest, to let our views, be developed to the public, by the execution of them, there will be time for further consideration. When the Sheep...
I have recd. your two letters of the 25. & 30. Ult. I have not yet seen any of the Secretaries to whom you have written on the subject of the papers relating to the Batture. I take for granted they will readily comply with your request. Mr. Gallatin is absent on a visit to his Farm in the Western parts of Pennsa. But his chief Clk will I presume be able to furnish the papers, if any, lying in...
Since I rendered the account of our Merinos sent on by My Overseer, I have learnt, that Mr. Hooe of Alexanda. considers the lamb yeaned after their arrival, as allotted to him by the intention of Mr. Jarvis. I have not yet investigated the merits of his claim, by comparing what he may have recd. from Mr. J. with the language of Mr. J’s letter to me; but I think it very possible that the claim...
The inclosed letters were brought, together with the separate Packet now forwarded, by the John Adams. The official communications received by her, from F. & G. B. you will find in the Natl. Intelligencer of this date. The Editor I perceive passes over the obnoxious refusal of G. B. to comply with the reasonable course of putting an end to the predatory Edicts of both Nations; and it is not...
I inclose an authentication of the blood of our Merinos, as translated from the Original by Mr. Graham: also a state of the charges incident to their passages &c. The half falling to your share, of course, may be left for any convenient occasion of being replaced. You need not trouble yourself to remit it hither. On the first publication of the dispatches by the J. Adams, so strong a feeling...
I have recd. your favor of the 27th. by which I find you have suspended the sending for your portion of the Merinos. I have not yet come to an eclaircissemt. with Mr. Hooe. I learn however that a reexamination of the tenor of Mr. J’s letter to him, has induced an abandonment of his pretensions to the Lamb. Still I am rather inclined to think that they are not altogether without foundation; &...
Not knowing where I could be enabled to answer the inclosed, with so much confidence in the fact, as in your acquaintance with the historical antiquities of Virginia, I take the liberty of asking whether I may not say to Mr. Bassette, that no such accounts as he enquires after, are known to exist. As he seems desirous of an early answer you will oblige me by a few lines as soon as convenient....
Among the papers relating to the Convention of 1787. communicated to you, that copies in your hands might double the security agst. destructive casualties, was a delineation of Hamilton’s plan of a Constitution in his own writing. On looking for it among the Debates &c, which were returned to me, this particular paper does not appear. I conclude therefore that it had not then been copied, or...
Yours of the 13th. was duly recd. I have answer’d Bassette’s Enquiry on the ground you have been so good as to furnish. Whether the lamb from the Merino Ewe is to remain ours or not, I think no time should now be lost in sending for your share, the season being at hand when the Ewes will be in heat; and as care will be taken of the lambs whenever they may drop, it will be best that they should...
I am offered the services of a Mr. Magee, now living with Mr. Randolph, as an overseer. I have discountenanced his offer, partly from an ignorance of his character, but particularly from the uncertainty whether Mr. R. means to part with him. Will you be kind eno’, by a line, merely to say 1st. whether it is decided that he is not to remain where he is, the only condition on which I wd. listen...
I have recd. your favor of the 15th. All we know of the step taken by France towards a reconciliation with us, is thro’ the English papers sent by Mr. Pinkney, who had not himself recd. any information on the subject from Genl. A. nor held any conversation with the B. Ministry on it, at the date of his last letters. We hope from the step, the advantage at least of having but one contest on our...
The letter inclosed came to me as you see it; and tho’ probably meant more for me than you, is forwarded according to its ostensible destination. We have nothing from abroad, more than has been made public. The latest date from Pinkn[e]y is the 3d. of Ocr. The arrival of Novr. will have been some test, positive or negative of the views of England. Her party here seems puzzled more than usual....
I have recd. yours inclosing two letters improperly addressed to you. A sketch in manuscript was brought by yesterday’s Mail from N. York, saying that a vessel just arrived, stated that the Prince Regent had appointed his Cabinet; that Lord Holland was prime Minister, Grenville Secretary of State, Moira Commander in Chief &c. and that a new Parliament was to be called. Whether these details be...
I intimated to you the offence taken by Armstrong at the re-enstatement of Warden. It is not improbable that it will be the ground of an open hostility. This will call into view his present denunciations of W. which are pointed agst. him as an Adventurer & Impostor from the commencement to the end of his career, in comparison with the patronage so long continued to him, and the sentiments...
I have recd. your favor of containing the requested extract from Armstrong’s letter relating to Warden. A. has entangled himself in such gross inconsistencies, that he may perhaps not execute this threat to vindicate his removal of W. agst. my reinstatement of him. This consideration alone will restrain his enmity agst. both of us. You will see the conflict in which he is engaged with Fulton....
I have recd. yours of the 24 Apl. and return the letter inclosed in it; after having made the communication intended for Mr Gallatin. Your expostulations with Duane could not be improved; but he gives proofs of a want of candor, as well as of temperance, that will probably repel advice however rational or friendly. The great fulcrum of his attacks on Mr. Gallatin, is Erskine’s statement of his...
I return the letter from you to D. on the subject of Mr. G. He seems to be incorrigible. If I am not misinformed, his eyes are opening to the conduct & character of Mr. S, with respect to both of which he has suffered himself to be misled partly by his own passions, partly by those who took advantage of them. You see the new shapes our foreign relations are taking. The occurrence between...
Your favor of the 3d. came duly to hand. You will have noticed in the Nat: Intelligencer that the wicked publication of Mr Smith is not to escape with impunity. It is impossible however that the whole turpitude of his conduct can be understood without disclosures to be made by myself alone, and of course, as he knows, not to be made at all. Without these his infamy is daily fastening itself...
I have recd. several letters from you which not requiring special answers, I now beg leave to acknowledge in the lump. I have delayed it in the hope that I might add something on our public affairs not uninteresting. If there be any thing at present of this character it will be found in the inclosed paper from N. York. We have no late official information from Europe; but all that we see from...
I return the letter from Foronda inclosed in yours of the 19th. Feby. I find I shall not be able to read his lucrubations [ sic ] in print. The letter from Dr. Guantt [ sic ] is in the hands of the Secy. of war, and will not be unheeded; but the course the nominations have taken makes it doubtful whether the wishes in behalf of his son, can be fulfilled. You will see that Congs. or rather the...
As the Intelligencer will not publish the Message & documents just laid before Congs. for the present Mail, I send you a copy of the former. It is justified by the Documents, among which are the original credential & instructions from the Govr. of Canada, and an original dispatch from the Earl of Liverpool to him approving the conduct of the Secret Agent. This discovery, or rather formal proof...
I have recd. your favor of the 26th. and have made to the members of the Cabinet the communication you suggest with respect to your printed memoir on the Batture. I learn from the Department of State that some books were recd. for you, and duly forwarded. What they were was not ascertained or remembered. If they do not on their arrival correspond with your expectation, let me know, & further...
I have just recd. your favor of the 17th. The same mail brings me the “Proceedings of the Govt. of the U. S. relative to the Batture” for which you will accept my thanks. I had not supposed that so great a proportion of produce, particularly of Wheat & flour, was still in the hands of the farmers. In Penna. it was known to be the case. In N. Y. almost the whole of the last crop, is in the...
The inclosed letters came under cover to me, by the Hornet. France has done nothing towards adjusting our differences with her. It is understood that the B. & M. Decrees are not in force agst. the U. S. and no contravention of them can be established agst. her. On the contrary positive cases rebut the allegation. Still the manner of the F. Govt. betrays the design of leaving G. B. a pretext...