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    • Madison, James
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Is the fact certain that the amt. of the internal taxes not objectionable in their nature would not have paid the Collectors? What is the amendment alluded to as necessary to a repartition of liberated revenues amg. the States in time of peace? page 3—“in any view” may be better than “in any event” that phrase having but just preceeded. Instead of “acts of religious exercise suited to it...
The inclosed letters from Cathcart & Mellimelli explain the unexpected & perplexing determination of the latter with respect to the Franklin. The least evil left to our choice has been thought to be that of chartering a vessel at Boston. Cathcart has accordingly been instructed to do so. It has been thought proper also to take advantage of a vessel going from Alexa. to Boston, for sending the...
(a) after ‘others’—the insertion of “with commissions”—seems necessary, as others refers to the armed vessels—not to commissns. (b) Instead of “under the controul”it may be well to insert some such phrase as “unreached by any controul” in order not to sanction a plea agst. indemnification, drawn from an acknowledgment on our part that the enenormities were uncontroulable. (c) “as unprofitable...
I have duly recd. yours of the 18th. with the papers to which it refers. It was neither sealed, nor inclosed in the larger packet. The accounts from the Mediterranean, as you will find are on the whole favorable. The explanations of Lear & the reinforcement under Baron, will probably overcome the repugnance of the Bey of Tunis to transact business with the Consul General, on account of his...
I have the satisfaction to inform you that the negociation on foot between the U. States & the Govt. of G.B. is proceeding in a spirit of friendship & accomodation which promises a result of mutual advantage. The delays which have taken place are to be regretted; but as they were occasioned by the long illness which ended in the death of the British Minister charged with that duty, they could...
The following memoranda, & the inclosed letter from Mr. Dallas will present to the President the state of the information in the office of State on the subject of the indictmt. under the sedition act agst. Duane, at the request of the Senate. The President will observe, that another prosecution agst. him, at Common law , is pending in the same Court. 16. May. 1800. Mr: Lee’s letter to Mr....
The last mail brought me yours inclosing the letters to you from P. Edwards & Mr. Gallatin, which I retain for your return. The supplemental instruction to A. & Bowdoin had not escaped attention. Subpœnas have this day been served on Genl. Dearborn, Mr. Smith & myself. The absence of Mr. Gallatin postpones the service on him. Mr. Wagner, Docr. Thornton, & Mr. Duncanson, & Mr. Bradley of...
Doctor Park of this City is setting out with his daughter, on a trip Southwards and proposes to be in Washington before he returns. He is an old acquaintance in the family of Mrs. Madison, and is truly an amiable & respectable man. That he may present his respects with the greater facility I have asked him to accept a few lines making him known to you. With sentiments of respectful attachment...
J. M. havg received notice this afternoon of the oppy. by a packet, has hastily written to Mr. King. The President will please to read it & return it as soon as possible, that if approved, it may be got into the mail tonight, witht. which the opportunity will be lost. RC ( DLC ); partially dated; endorsed by TJ as received from the State Department on 10 Dec. and so recorded in SJL with...
a free use of their harbors & waters, the means of refitting & refreshment, of succour to their sick & suffering have at all times and on equal principles, been extended to all; and this too while the officers of one of the belligerents recd. among us were in a continued course of insubordination to the laws, of violence to the persons of our Citizens, and of trespasses on their property....
The Bearer Mr. Dade has just handed me the inclosed which he wishes to support with your; the object it explains. In addition to the testimonies of Mr Taylor &c &c I have a letter from my brother which speaks the same language, as justified by his personal knowledge. I was but slightly acquainted myself, with Mr Dade, but his character as I have always viewed it thro’ his standing in the...
J M. is obliged to send back the papers wanted by the P. witht. having executed the task of remodelling the 1st. & 2d. Ps. He was prevented last night by Company, and has but just got up for breakfast. If the P. can spare it he will immediately go to work; or if he can send the rough original of that part, it will do as well. The notes of Mr. G. are retained DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
I inclose herewith sundry communications which I recd. yesterday. One of them is from Monroe at Paris, who appears by a letter from Erving to have arrived at London the latter end of July. A letter from Armstrong went for you by the last mail. He seems to have moderated the scope of his former advice as to Spain. In that now given, there is in my judgment, great solidity: If force should be...
✓ (0) for “before” is suggested “without” the former seeming to imply that after the suspension, an assignt. had been made. ✓ (1) after or for “friendly” insert “proper” omit “without difficulty or delay.” There was perhaps somewhat of both, and it may become expedient to say so to Spain. (2.) [“]The enlightened mind of the first Consul of France saw in its true point of view the importance of...
I recd. this morning your favor of the 14th. and inclose the printed copies of the Acts of Congs. obtained from your Cabinet as pointed out. I inclose also a list of all the Acts, that you may direct a supply of any deficiency. The letter to you from Clarke Mead &c relating to the Witnesses agst. White proceeds on a mistake of the legal allowance. This was originally 50 cents per day; but an...
Yours of yesterday was duly recd. by the rider. I return Shorts & A’s letter. Your observations on the latter place the subject of it in its true point of view. Perhaps the Rider of today may bring me a letter of the same date, that may have lost the last mail by passing thro’ the office of State. If the letter to you be the sole communication it is another example from that quarter, of...
(a) and which have been encreased by peculiar circumstances in the W. Indn Seas; yet in the more distant channels at least of our trade, b. The act authorizes &c provisionally at least—a port &c without the limits of the U. S. The words in ( ) may be left out. c— (on the part of Spain) d. (proper to suspend) will according better with the case—as the 6th art. is also made a ground of...
The mail not having returned from Milton when my messenger left the Court House on monday evening, & it having been inconvenient to send thither at any time since, I can not now acknowledge any favor which may have come from you since my last. Among the letters inclosed is one from Higginson seconding the application from Philada. for your patronage to a demand on the vice Govt of the La plata...
The Secretary of State, to whom the President has been pleased to refer the resolution of the Senate, dated on the 10th inst. has the honor to make the following report. The most important of the principles interpolated into the law of Nations, is that which appears to be maintained by the British Government, & its prize Courts, that a trade opened to neutrals by a Nation at war, on account of...
Your favors of the 5th. & 6th. were duly recd. last evening. I return Mr. S.s letter, with the Addresses from Boston &c. and the proposed answer. The few changes which I have suggested, if proper will speak for themselves. It is a nice task to speak of war, so as to impress our own people with a dislike of it, and not impress foreign Govts. with the idea that they may take advantage of the...
I recd. on monday evening your favor of Mar. 23. with the return of Armstrong’s & Monroe’s letters first sent you. I cannot entirely despair that Spain notwithstanding the support given by France to her claim to W. F. may yield to our propo<s>ed arrangement, partly from its intrinsic value to her, partly from an apprehension of the interference of G.B; and that this latter consider [ sic ]...
The Mail of last evening brought me your favor of the 15th. with the papers sent back with it. I shall forbear using your Blank for an exequatur till I can again confer with Mr. Pichon who is at Baltimore. The sending on the intercepted presents to the Porte would certainly be a handsome & politic expression of respect for the Grand Seignor, who otherwise may be thrown by his displeasure into...
Report to the President. The Secretary of State, in pursuance of the Resolution of the House of Representatives of the 11th. of November, respectfully reports to the President, a copy of an Act of the British Parliament regulating the trade between the United States, & Great Britain; and also copies of such Belligerent Acts, Decrees, orders and Proclamations, as affect Neutral rights of...
I inclose the letter alluded to in my last from Mr. Merry to Mr. Wagner; also a letter from Barney & one from L. Harris. I have authorized Mr. W. to forward any more information relating to Barney’s claims, to Mr Skipwith, reminding him that no further interposition could be made, unless you should so decide. A patronage of individual claims, besides its interference with the functions of the...
I have recd. yours of the 16th. with the accompanying papers. The communications &c. recd. since my last are enclosed. The letters from Paris are important, but I do not see in them the wish of the F. Govt. to retract the bargain with our Ministers, so much as an anxiety to secure its execution agst. the intrusions of G. B. and to feel thro’ their pulse, whether we were or were likely to be in...
The Secretary of State in compliance with the Note of the President, relating to the public property at New Orleans as reported by Governor Claiborne to the Secretary of the Treasury; begs leave to state that no part of that property appears to fall in any respect under the perview of the Department of State, unless it be the Government House, and the lot on which it stands. This it is...
I have just recd. yours of the 29. and enclose the papers noted "to be returned." I think the best, and probably not the most expensive conveyance of Mr. S. will be in a small public vessel, whether she go directly to his destination, or deliver him in France, and unless, previous to his departure, collateral reasons should urge an early communication to France or England, it appears to be...
I inclose two letters from Monroe recd. since your departure. The intermediate ones referred to, of the 16 & 18. of Decr. are not yet recd. I inclose also a Letter of Decr. 24. from Armstrong; who I am pleased to find understands the language in which the honorable & honest policy of this Country ought to be expressed. you will find that I obey the wish of Govr. Claiborne in taxing you with a...
A few alterations are suggested on the supposition that it may be best to present the transaction, as a disavowal of war & a conformation of peace , rather than as a pacification which might involve the necessary idea of Treaty—I take for granted that Mr Smith will have an oppy. of expressing his opinion as to the graduation of praise to the Officers— As so many names are mentioned, & it is...
The Secretary of State supposes, that the within abstract in the form of a report to the President, with the decree annexed to it, and the documents and correspondence communicated to Congress between the date of the Senate’s resolution and that of the report, will be an ample compliance with the requisition of the former. The favor is requested that the packet enclosed herewith for Mr....