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    • Madison, James
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    • Washington, George
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Documents filtered by: Author="Madison, James" AND Recipient="Washington, George" AND Period="Washington Presidency"
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Mr. Madison presents his respectful compliments to the President, and informs him that Mr. Johnson, the candidate for the light-house appointment, having left the City yesterday morning, it cannot now be ascertained how far he is apprised of the limited provision annexed to the place. RC ( DNA : RG 59, State Department, Miscellaneous Letters). Addressed by JM.
Mr Madison presents his respectful compliments to the President, and begs leave to lay before him the inclosed letters, on behalf of a candidate for a vacancy in the Custom-House Department in Virginia. Mr M. being a perfect stranger to the candidate can add no information whatever of his own. He knows Mr Maury well, and considers his recommendation as respectable. AL , DLC:GW . On the reason...
Mr. Madison presents his respectful compliments to the President, and begs to mention the wish of Joseph Nevil Esqr. (late a member of the House of Representatives) to be taken into consideration in the appointment of Surveyor, under the law for the sale of lands N. West of the Ohio. He takes the liberty also of inclosing a letter from General Posey, expressing his wishes with respect to an...
J. Madison presents his respectful compliments to the President & returns the Treatise on small Canals &c, with his acknowledgments for the perusal of it. He is not enough conversant with such subjects to decide on the merits of the various plans & machinery recommended by the Author. In general his principles appear to be both effective & practicable; but the question of their utility must be...
J. Madison presents his apologies to the President for not sending the pamphlets &c. from Sir J. Sinclair, sooner for the use of Mr. Peters, as was intimated when he last had the honor of seeing the President. He had hopes of being able prior to this to have looked a little into them, and have complied with the desire of the President expressed when the papers were put into J. M’s hands. It...
After being detained 8 or 10 days beyond the intended commencement of my Journey, by the critical illness of my mother, I am now subjected to a further delay by an attack on my own health. A slight complaint in my bowels which I first felt on the day of my arrival here (friday last) very suddenly took the form of a pretty severe dysentery. With the aid of Doctr Stuart who has been good eno’ to...
Mr Madison presents his respectful compliments to the President of the United States, with a letter from Arthur Cambell Esqr. which an accompanying letter to Mr M. requests him to deliver to the President. Mr Cambell makes a further request of Mr M. to make any explanations that may be necessary. Mr M. is not sensible that he possesses any local or other knowledge that can elucidate the...
J. Madison presents his respectful compliments to the President & returns the Treatise on small Canals &c., with his acknowledgments for the perusal of it. He is not enough conversant with such subjects to decide on the merits of the various plans & machinery recommended by the Author. In general his principles appear to be both effective & practicable; but the question of their utility must...
Mr Madison presents his respectful compliments to the President, and informs him that Mr Johnson⟨,⟩ the candidate for the light-house appointment, having left the City yesterday morning, it cannot now be ascertained how far he is apprised of the limited provision annexed to the place. AL , DNA : RG 59, Miscellaneous Letters. For background on John Waller Johnston’s unsuccessful attempts to...
In the course of the visit we made the day we left Mount Vernon, we drew our host into conversation on the subject of the federal seat. He came into it with a shyness not usual in him. Whether this proceeded from his delicacy as having property adjoining George town, or from what other motive I cannot say. He quitted the subject always as soon as he could. He said enough however to shew his...