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RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Addressed to “His Excellency Thomas Jefferson Esqr” and marked “private.” Docketed by Jefferson, “Madison Jas May 5. 1781.” In compliance with your request I have procured and now send you a copy of the Constitutions &c published by order of Congress. I know not why the order in which they stand in the Resolution was varied by the committee in binding them up. The...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Addressed to “Thomas Jefferson Esqr. Richmond.” Docketed, “Madison Nov. 18. 1781 recd. Jan. 9. 1782.” By the conveyance through which you will receive this the Delegates have communicated to the State the proceedings in Congress to which the territorial cessions have given birth. The complexion of them will I suppose be somewhat unexpected, & produce no small...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). The cover is missing, but the letter was docketed by Jefferson, “Madison Jas. Jany. 15. 1782.” Your favor of the day of written on the eve of your departure from Richmond came safe to hand by the last week’s post. The result of the attack on your administration was so fully anticipated that it made little impression on me. If it had been consistent with your...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Docketed by Jefferson, “Madison Jas. Mar 18. 1782.” In my last to you on the subject of the map in the hands of Dr. Smith I informed you of the little chance of getting a copy of it for you. Nothing has since occurred wch. affords the least expectation from that quarter, but I have met with a bundle of old pamplets belonging to the public Library here in which is a...
Printed text ( Madison, Papers [Gilpin ed.] Henry D. Gilpin, ed., The Papers of James Madison (3 vols.; Washington, 1840). , I, 116). The letter has not been found. A letter has been lately received from you by the President of Congress, accompanied by a bundle of papers procured from the Cherokees by Colonel Campbell. As it appears that these papers were transmitted at the request of the late...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Addressed, “Ths. Jefferson Esqr.” Jefferson wrote “Madison Jas.” above the date at the beginning of the letter. Your favor of the 24 of March with a letter inclosed for Mr. Marbois came to hand yesterday. I intreat that you will not suffer the chance of a speedy and final determination of the territorial question by Congress to affect your purpose of tracing the...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Addressed to “Thos. Jefferson Esq.” Docketed by Jefferson, “Madison Jas. Feby. 11. 1783.” The words italicized in the third paragraph are those written by JM in the cipher described in Jefferson to JM, 31 Jan. 1783 , ed. n. Also in LC : Madison Papers is JM’s draft of the letter. Your favor of the 31 of Jany. was safely brought by Mr. Thomson. That of the 7. inst:...
RC ( LC : George B. McClellan Papers, Vol. I). Cover missing, but docketed by Jefferson, “Madison Jas Feby. 12. 1783.” I acknowledged yesterday by the post your two favors of the 30th. ult: & 7th. inst: I add this by Col: Jameson just to inform you that your letter to the Secy. of F. A. has been referred to a Committee consisting of Mr. Jones, Mr. Rutlidge & Mr. Wilson, who are to confer with...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Docketed by JM, “Madison Jas. Feby. 13. 1783.” The Chevr. de la Luzerne having just given me notice that he shall send an Express to the Romulus in ½ an hour I sieze the opportunity of inclosing a copy of the British Kings Speech which presages a speedy establishment of peace. What effect this circumstance may have on your mission is at present uncertain. For myself...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Docketed by Jefferson, “Madison Jas.” The Committee, to whom was referred your letter to Secretary Livingston, reported to Congress yesterday that they had conferred with Mr. Morris who was of opinion that no vessel would sail from american ports after the arrival of the British King’s speech until the suspence produced by it should be removed, and that if your...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Addressed to “The honble T. Jefferson.” Unless otherwise noted, the words italicized are those that were written by JM in the cipher described in Jefferson to JM, 31 Jan. 1783 , ed. n. After recovering the present letter from Jefferson, JM wrote “Madison Jas.” above the date line. In his old age he or someone at his direction placed a bracket at the close of both the...
MS ( LC : Jefferson Papers). Three pages of notes, undated and unsigned but in JM’s hand. Probably given to Thomas Jefferson in Philadelphia about 6 March 1783. Many years later Jefferson’s secretary, Nicholas P. Trist, attached to the memorandum a page bearing the comment, “This is, I believe, in the handwriting of Mr. Madison, N.P.T .” Ca. 6 March 1783 . The contents of this memorandum,...
RC ( LC : Papers of Madison). Jefferson docketed the letter by writing “Madison Jas” above the date line. Using the JM-Jefferson Code N. 2, JM encoded the words that are italicized. Your favor of the 14. inst: written on the Susquehanna with the several letters inclosed were safely delivered to me. I did not fail to present as you desired your particular compliments to Miss K Your inference on...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Address on cover is no longer legible, except for “Thomas Jefferson Esqr.” Docketed by him, “Madison Jas. May 6 1783.” On the verso of the cover Jefferson deciphered the passages written in the JM-Jefferson Code No. 2, and here italicized. This code was first used by Jefferson in his letter of 14 April 1783 to JM ( Papers of Madison William T. Hutchinson, William M....
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Cover franked by JM and addressed to “Thomas Jefferson Esqr.” Many years later, after recovering the letter, JM docketed the cover page, “Madison Jas May. 13, 1783.” Henry D. Gilpin printed all of the letter except the last paragraph ( Madison, Papers [Gilpin ed.] Henry D. Gilpin, ed., The Papers of James Madison (3 vols.; Washington, 1840). , I, 531–32). The...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Unsigned but in JM’s hand. Addressed to “Thomas Jefferson Esqr.” Following the return of this letter to JM, he docketed it “Madison Jas.” above the date. Many years after the letter was written, he or someone at his bidding placed a bracket at the beginning of the second paragraph and another bracket at the close of the third paragraph to designate them for inclusion...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Many years later after recovering the letter, JM wrote “Madison, Jas.” above the date line. The words italicized in the present copy were written in the JM-Jefferson Code No. 2. Congress have recd. two letters from Mr. Laurens dated London [,] one the fiveteenth of March the other fiveth of April . In the former he persists in the jealousy expressed in his letter of
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Cover missing. JM docketed the letter, upon recovering it many years later, “Madison, Jas. July 17. 1783.” Your two favors of the 1 & 17 of June, with the debates of Congress and the letter for Miss Floyd and the Cyphers inclosed in the former, and your amendments to the Constitution inclosed in the latter, have been duly recd. The latter came by yesterday’s mail. I...
RC ( LC : Madison Papers). Cover missing. After recovering the letter, JM docketed it, “Madison Jas Aug: 11. 1783.” Probably also at that time he heavily excised in ink all of his first paragraph except its opening two and closing two sentences. To the partial decipherments of the thirteen obliterated lines by Irving Brant in his biography of Madison (II, 286, 450, n. 7) and Julian P. Boyd in...
26 March 1782, Philadelphia. Reports receipt of a letter from Jefferson with a bundle of papers procured from the Cherokees. “My letter by Mr. Randolph contains as late intelligence as any we have yet recd.” RC (NNC-RB: Alexander Hamilton Papers). 1 p.; printed in PJM William T. Hutchinson et al., eds., The Papers of James Madison (1st ser., vols. 1–10, Chicago, 1962–77; vols. 11–17,...
Nothing under the title of news has occurred since I wrote last week by express except that the Enemy on the 1st. of March remained in the neighbourhood of Charlestown in the same posture as when the preceding account came away. From the best intelligence from that quarter there seems to be great encouragement to hope that Clinton’s operations will be again frustrated. Our great apprehensions...
I am sorry I can give you no other account of our public situation than that it continues equally perplexed and alarming as when I lately gave you a sketch of it. Our army has as yet been kept from starving and public measures from a total stagnation by draughts on the States for the unpaid requisitions. The great amount of these you may judge of from the share that has fallen to Virginia. The...
I have written several private letters to you since my arrival here, which as they contained matters that I should be sorry should fall into other hands, I could wish to know had been received. If your Excellency has written any acknowledgements of them, they have never reached me. Mr. Griffin tells me he has seen several letters just received by Mr. Bingham from Martinique which give...
A Vessel from West Florida has brought to the President of Congress intelligence from Govr. Galvez of the surrender of Mobile. No other particulars than that contained in the inclosed paper are mentioned, except the verbal report of the Capt. that the Garrison consisted of about 800 including inhabitants &c. Seven or eight vessels have just arrived from the W. Indies as you will also observe...
Nothing material has taken place since my last. The fact is confirmed that Clinton has returned to N.Y. with part of the Southern army, and has joined Kniphausen. They are at present man[oeuvering] for purposes not absolutely known, but most probably in order to draw Genl. Washington to an action in which they suppose he may be disabled to give the necessary co-operation to the french...
I am at length able to give you some answer on the subject of the map in the hands of Dr. Smith . As the Doctor lived out of Town and it was difficult to know when he was to be found in it, and as I supposed the request would go with greater weight through Mr. Rittenhouse, I asked the favor of him to speak to the Doctor on the subject. Through forgetfulness or want of opportunity he failed to...
The inclosed extract of a letter from General Washington No. 1 will give your Excellency a more particular account of the late embarkation from N. York than has been before obtained. On Thursday last Congress were informed by General Potter and Col. Johnston who came expresses for the purpose that a general mutiny of the Pennsylvania line stationed near Morris Town apart from the rest of the...
I have received your favor of the 23d. of March . The publication of which you wish to have a copy for your private use is not yet finished; as soon as it is I shall take care to provide one for you. I have repeatedly reminded Dr. Smith of his promise with respect to the map, but have never obtained any thing more than a repetition of the promise. He is at present an inhabitant of Maryland....
The inclosed paper is a copy of a report from a Committee now lying on the table of Congress for Consideration. The delicacy and importance of the subject makes me wish for your judgment on it before it undergoes the final decision of Congress. The necessity of arming Congress with coercive powers arises from the shameful deficiency of some of the States which are most capable of yielding...
On the receipt of your request as to the map I procured a copy with one of the pamphlets and have put it under the care of Col. Febiger who will have it conveyed. It is effectually secured against injury on its passage. I inclose your Excellency a letter from Mazzei although indeed its contents are of no great moment. I have not received the antecedant one referred to in it. The Executive have...
In compliance with your request I have procured and now send you a copy of the Constitutions &c. published by order of Congress. I know not why the order in which they stand in the Resolution was varied by the Committee in binding them up. The encomium on the inhabitants of Rhode Island was a flourish of a Delegate from [that] State who furnished the Committee with the account of its...
By the conveyance through which you will receive this the Delegates have communicated to the State the proceedings in Congress to which the territorial cessions have given birth. The complexion of them will I suppose be somewhat unexpected, and produce no small irritation. They clearly speak the hostile machinations of some of the States against our territorial claims, and afford suspicions...
Your favor of the day of written on the eve of your departure from Richmond came safe to hand by the last week’s post. The result of the attack on your administration was so fully anticipated that it made little impression on me. If it had been consistent with your sentiments and views to engage in the new service to which you were called , it would have afforded me both unexpected and...
In my last to you on the subject of the map in the hands of Dr. Smith I informed you of the little chance of getting a copy of it for you. Nothing has since occurred which affords the least expectation from that quarter. But I have met with a bundle of old pamphlets belonging to the public Library here in which is a map published in 1650 which from this and other circumstances I am pretty...
A letter has been lately received from you by the President of Congress , accompanied by a bundle of papers procured from the Cherokees by Colonel Campbell. As it appears that these papers were transmitted at the request of the late President, it is proper to apprize you that it was made without any written or verbal sanction , and even without the knowledge of Congress; and not improbably...
Your favor of the 24 of March with a letter inclosed for Mr. Marbois came to hand yesterday. I intreat that you will not suffer the chance of a speedy and final determination of the territorial question by Congress to affect your purpose of tracing the title of Virga. to her claims. It is in the first place very uncertain when a determination will take place, even if it takes place at all; and...
Your favor of the 31 of Jany. was safely brought me by Mr. Thomson. That of the 7. instant came by yesterdays mail. The anecdote related in the first was new to me; and if there were no other key, would sufficiently decypher the implacability of the party triumphed over. In answer to the second I can only say at this time that I feel deeply for your situation: that I approve of the choice you...
The Chevr. de la Luzerne having just given me notice that he shall send an Express to the Romulus in ½ an hour I sieze the opportunity of inclosing a copy of the British Kings speech which presages a speedy establishment of peace. What effect this circumstance may have on your mission is at present uncertain. For myself I cannot think that any thing short of a final and authentic ratification...
The Committee, to whom was referred your letter to Secretary Livingston, reported to Congress yesterday that they had conferred with Mr. Morris who was of opinion that no vessel would sail from American ports after the arrival of the British King’s speech until the suspence produced by it should be removed, and that if your immediate embarkation were still wished by Congress it would be proper...
Your two favors of the 14th. one of them inclosing a letter to Miss Floyd were received by yesterday’s mail. The last paper from N.Y. as the inclosed will shew you has brought us another token of the approach of peace. It is somewhat mysterious nevertheless that the preliminaries with America should be represented by Secy. Townsend as actually signed and those with France as to be signed , as...
Your favor of the 14. inst: written in the Susquehanna with the several letters inclosed were safely delivered to me. I did not fail to present as you desired your particular compliments to Miss K. Your inference on that subject was not groundless. Before you left us I had sufficiently ascertained her sentiments. Since your departure the affair has been pursued. Most preliminary arrangements,...
Your favor of the 21. Ult. written at Col: Pendleton’s was brought to hand by the post of last week. Col: Floyd’s family did not set out untill the day after it was received. I accompanied them as far as Brunswick, about 60 Miles from this, and returned hither on friday evening. Mr. Jones will attend the Assembly, and proposes to begin his journey this afternoon, if the present rain should...
Marbois lately took occasion in our family to complain of ungenerous proceedings of the British against individuals as well as against their enemies at large and finally signified that he was no stranger to the letter transmited to Congress which he roundly avered to be spurious. His information came from Boston where the incident is said to be no secret, but whether [it] be the echo of...
In obedience to your request I am to answer by this post your favor of the 7. inst. received yesterday. My brevity will therefore be excused. For the tenor of the conditions on which Congress were formerly willing to accept the Cession of Virga. I beg leave to refer to their resolutions of the 6 of Sepr. and 10 of Oct. 1780. I take it for granted you have their Journals. The expunging of the...
Congress have received two letters from Mr. Laurens dated one the fifteenth of March the other fifth of April . In the former persists in the jealousy expressed in his letter of the thirtieth of December of the British Councils. He says that Shelburne had
Your two favors of the 1 and 17 of June, with the debates of Congress and the letter for Miss Floyd and the Cyphers inclosed in the former, and your amendments to the Constitution inclosed in the latter, have been duly received. The latter came by yesterdays mail. I feel too sensibly the value of these communications to omit my particular acknowledgments for them. The usual reserve of our...
At the date of my letter in April I expected to have had the pleasure by this time of being with you in Virginia. My disappointment has proceeded from several dilatory circumstances on which I had not calculated. [One of them was the uncertain state into which the object I was then pursuing has been brought by one of those incidents to which such affairs are liable. The result has rendered the...
I acknowledged yesterday by the post your two favors of the 30th. Ult : and 7th. inst: I add this by Col: Jameson just to inform you that your letter to the Secy. of F. A. has been referred to a Committee consisting of Mr. Jones, Mr. Rutlidge and Mr. Wilson, who are to confer with Mr. Morris as Agent of Marine, and report to Congs. whether any and what remedy can be applied to your...
Plan proposed consists of 1st. permanent revenue. 2. abatements in favor of the States distressed by the war. 3. common mass of all reasonable expences incurred by the States without sanction of Congress. 4. territorial cessions. Manner in which the interests of the several States will be affected by these objects: N. Hamshire will approve the establishment of permanent revenue, as tending to...