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As the fiercest Tyrant and the mildest philosopher possess equally the power of self-examination, so the whole human race may be allowed to search after the source of Life & of Morals. Such search, conducted by Reason, and proceeding downwards from the branching-ends of both those Trees, will assuredly find only the single common tap-root to be Self-Love. As no President of these United States...
Our Lincoln is wreathing in the Fox-trap of pretended-Friends. And the desendants of those Same Mice, who nibbled you when you sent good-Ellsworth to France, have been Striving to make holes in a Small Mole-hill here . I long to have in a proper “Hole,” Some of that “Sweet Converse” with you which the now-cautious Demos extorted into a rascally Public Gazette Chronicle. But, Sir, the Set-time...
Having upon the 17th: written to your political Secretary of the Treasury What was then proper to be communicated to the President of the United States; I chuse now to present myself to your Authority as to a Critic of Literature and Morals and, in consequence to offer some sketches from “a Bundle of facts and anecdotes.” A rich young-Man, in days of yore, was advised, by a meek & lowly Person...
Hoping to have, very speedily, an opportunity of testifying my Esteem of you, at your own house, in propria personâ; I now take the freedom of making a previous intreaty that you would find from Judge Cranch the origin of the Katascoptic Club; which met at the Chamber of Edmd. Quincy 3. times in a Chamber at in the Widow Salter’s House where Gl. Donnison now lives; – in 1756 or 57. I beg you...
§ From James Lovell. 27 January 1806, Boston. “I am honoured by your kind Close of the business which regarded my grand children. I will teach the young Things to esteem you and your agent from my own feelings: And I beg you to be assured that your Gravity and his Jocularity in the conveyance of your Sympathies for our disappointments greatly exceed in Value the Defalcation of my Bank-Bill. I...
When in August 1802 I first “spread myself with sincerity”, before your official Chain, as we are taught to do, when we go for our daily bread, before an Altar; I hinted my odd yet serious intention of a public attempt to “rarify some of the clouds of our Religion and Polity”. That intention has been hiterto artfully frustrated; which has driven me to the necessity of letting loose (after a...
29 March 1805, Boston . “Your prompt communication to me of the 20th. of this month is in strict unison with your former Kindness. “Instantly upon reading it I recollected my rejecting three or four bills of 100 dollars, because they were patched; and inclosing one that was whole, without any more minute scrutiny. I am ashamed of the hasty manner in which I closed my letter that evening for...
Self Interest once forced me to intrude upon the busy moments of your Excellency, for the purpose of showing how much it was my own choice to hold a Commission “during the Pleasure of the President of the United-States for the time being.”   A more generous motive leads me to intrude a second time, for the purpose of proving how much I am convinced that my watchful concern for my own...
Genl. Roberdeau & his Friends attributed his escape from Death, while in the flying Camp of 77 under a mortal Dysentery, intirely to the use of the arrow-Root, much famed in the W Indies. Though I abominate all quack Interferences, yet my affectionate Esteem for your Family will not let me omit to send Part of what I happen to possess of that rare Powder; having, or thinking I have,...
[ Boston, January 31, 1794. On February 20, 1794, Hamilton wrote to Lincoln, Lovell, and Melville : “I am to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 31st ultimo.” Letter not found. ] Lincoln was the collector, Lovell the naval officer, and Melville the surveyor of the port of Boston.
[ Boston, August 22, 1793. On November 29, 1793, Hamilton wrote to Lovell : “Various circumstances have prevented an earlier answer to your letter of the 22d of August last.” Letter not found. ] Lovell was the naval officer for the port of Boston.
Agreably to the directions of your circular letter of August 31st. covering an order of the Senate passed on the 7th. of may last, I now transmit the demanded account. I cannot, however, refrain from expressing an Hope that my statements may not prove injurious to such Officers as have had usual & necessary Assistance of Clerks, without being driven to devote their own Nights as well as days...
From the Borders of the Grave, revived, and even established in Health, I once more present my Respects, with my accustomed Fervency to You and Yours. But, with my Respects I must also send my Complaints and Supplications. In a Transaction where you was only, according to your own chosen Expressions, Teste di Legno, I was fretted disgraced and beslaved; and have taken some Measures for...
It is a very happy Circumstance, sick & megrim’d as I am, that I have so excellent an Opportunity as the present, by Mr Jarvis our Comptroller General, of evading with great Advantage to the Public, a written Answer to your important Questions “how are Trade, Shipbuilding &c. &c. affected by the new Government?” No Man perhaps has had more regular mercantile Education and few Men have...
You will have a Visit from your old Friend Genl. Warren who supposed I could certify some Intentions of the former Congress greatly to his Advantage. Your Namesake has done it; but I found it impossible for me upon a strict Review of the Case. As you were absent part of the Time I think it my Duty to save you the Toil of searching those Journals wherein this Business is scattered. The Sketch...
Though I know of your extreme Delicacy as to any Interference in the executive Affairs of the USs. yet to you I must apply; for, Heaven & Secretary Jackson know I may be chagrined in an Attempt to address the President. I am in Dread least an Action should take place which will renew Vigor of the Opponents & damp the Spirits of the Friends of Government: And, it will be out of Time to await...
Though your Excellency be not a Pope nor I a Murderer, yet I write under the full Influence of an Idea expressed by Cicero, when soliciting for his Friend Fabius the Patronage of Marcus Cælius a Curule Odile; “novi ego vos magnos patronos: hominem occidat oportet qui vestra opera uti velit” —When I first addressed myself to your Excellency, thirteen years ago, my Life & Liberty were at Stake,...
I had often considered your Situation, before the receipt of your Letter of the 16th; and I had hoped you would "Possess yourself in Patience ." If you already draw a picture, Teste di legno and talk of sharpening an ax for Decapitation, what am I to look for in the Run of a twelvemonth? I do not like your diminuitive italien Idea. You who are said to be more than half British ought to have...
altho’ this letter is somewhat of a public nature, yet I dare not address you in a consonant manner, ‘till the Point is settled between his Excellency and John Adams. I apply to you, as I feel you in my Heart to be; satisfied that the Yeas & Nays of no public Body whatsoever concerning Epithets can in any way measure alter Essences . Dear Sir, Sturgis Gorham of Barnstable is my Brother in Law,...
M r. Du err , as you pronounce it, and my Wife seem to think alike as to the Powers of an Ambassadress when placed as an Helpmate to the Ambassador. M r D. had an Idea of an handsome Face M rs. L thought only of the Good Sense of the Lady. If this is ambiguous , y r. best Friend can make it plain so far as relates to Du err . As to M rs. L I will show her to you in a Minute, just as She...
Advised and even pressed, by Friends near me and at a Distance, “ to go on to New York;—to be in the Way of soliciting, counteracting ” and such kind of Measures respecting the Collectorship here, I am sure I need only say to you that my Duty lays in this County; and that the very Circumstance of quitting & neglecting it for the Purposes mentioned would be a very ill Proof of that Degree of...
Suppose every proper Epithet to occupy these two upper Lines. Under them all I most cordially salute you. Once upon the Arrival of a Ship from France “you was too happy to find Time for answering Letters.” I do not now want any Answer. All I wish is that you may steal from yourself and one other a Minute for reading this short Scrawl. Your Benevolence and your Curiosity secure my Wish; and,...
I did not omit to write by the Conveyance of one of the most amiable Women I ever knew. I only omitted to send my written Congratulations to you upon that Felicity which her Presence must afford after so long a Seperation. Capital Sacrifice to your Country thus pleasingly in part rewarded! The Consul Gen l. of France, my Neighbour, then informed me that M rs. Adams had sailed while I slept,...
It is long, since I took any Opportunity of repeating Assurances of my sincere and very great Esteem for you. Tired most heartily of the Jealousies & Animosities which are almost inseperable from governmental Emploies, and very hardly put to it to find Bread to eat or Rayment to cloathe myself and my numerous Family, I have rarely felt any proper Disposition of Mind for an Attempt to write...
I have not to this day Information that you comprehend the Cypher w ch. I have very often used in my Letters. You certainly can recollect the Name of that Family where you and I spent our last Evening with your Lady before we sat out on our Journey hither. Make regular Alphabets in Number equal to the first Sixth part of that Family Name, beginning and regularlarly placing your Alphabets...
Probable as it is that the Admiral now gives you the most authentic European Intelligence I would not however omit by this good and early Conveyance to send to your Excellency Minutes of a Letter just received from Mr Adams and an open News Paper for Mr Morris tho’ I am too ill to examine it to find whether it is worth your Reading being under violent Symptoms of a Fever. Your Excellency’s...
Your Excellency will receive so many Solicitations of the same Kind with This that I need not fear the Charge of Singularity while I beg your protection for the person and property of Mr George Joy in the city of New York which is Speedily to be evacuated say the people of Boston. Mr Joy is now barely of the age of 21 years, and has been uniformly as serviceable to many other prisoners as he...
The inclosed containing an Official Remittance of Money is recommended to you for Conveyance by one of your Expresses, from your most humble Servant DLC : Papers of George Washington.
A very high Degree of Jealousy possesses the Breast of my Correspondent concerning the Insincerity of some of the Cabinet Council of Vermont in their present Conduct towards Congress: This Jealousy, manifest in every Conversation which I have had with him here should not however make me neglect to convey to your Excellency such Information as the inclosed, which, if corroborated by other...
“Mr. Lovell, do let me entreat you, this thirtieth time, to write a few Lines to Mrs. Adams. Are you not clearly convinced that it is in vain for you to determine, as you have done, day after day, that you will go to see her? You are betrayed, by a thousand Interruptions, not merely into Unpoliteness, but really into Ingratitude to that Lady. If you do not feel for yourself, I pray you to...
I have not yet been made certain, that you comprehend that Cypher which I used in my Letters to you, and which will yet awhile be used. You are to form Alphabets equal in number and of the same commencement and Range, as the Letters of the first sixth part of the family Name where you and I supped last with Mrs. Adams, and you are to look alternately into those constructed Alphabets opposite...
In answer to some Questions contained in your Letter of Sepr. 26 you may know that Mr. Laurens might pay any sum up to five hundred po unds s terling therefore the same is now to be done at discretion. F. Dana is accompanied under somewhat similar discretionary stipulations. Indeed you are mistaken about the Scales. I should be happy to be sure of what you only conjecture. I mean that J. Jay...
My Almanac says that I wrote to you on the 9th. of October, but your Favour of Sepr. 26. received the 8th. of Octr. is not endorsed answered. Is this the Reason of your Silence? Or, Heaven forbid it! are you sick? At best, I fear you are in Distress.—Mr. Adams was well late in Augst., but I cannot conceal my anxieties about your second Son, who was to take Passage with Gillon. That Frigate...
I shall have an excellent Opportunity to send those Articles of yours, which have been long under my Care, by a Waggon of Genl. Lincoln going in a few days to Boston and perhaps also to Hingham. I feel a Sort of Mortification, at the Air of Negligence which seems to be thrown over my past Endeavors to serve you, by this early Execution of the Promises which our good Friend Lincoln made to you...
I gave a Letter for your Excellency this morning to some Gentleman who is connected with the French army. I now understand it will not reach you in Eight Days, but it will reach you doubtless then. It was merely to compleat the Account of the Cyphers used by the Enemy. I found, as I had before supposed, that they sometimes use Entick’s Dictionary marking the Page Column & Word as 115. 1. 4 ....
Yesterday’s Post brought me your Favour of Sepr. 26th. Your dear Boy Charles should most certainly have had half of the Bed of one of his Father’s devoted Friends here, if the Winds had so directed the Ship’s Course in which he is a Passenger; but I am told she is arrived at Falmouth in Casco Bay. I wish you an happy Meeting with him. I shall be rejoyced to find that the Voyage has been...
I doubt not Madam, you have Letters from Mr. Adams of later Date than what we have received but that Fact will not prevent your Expectations of Something from me in the Way of retailed Politicks: — He has sent as I imagine but few duplicates of what are actually on Board Gillon. He dated May 16 and Augst. 3d. from Amsterdam, July 11. 14. 15 from Paris. He thinks Britain altogether insincere as...
ALS : American Philosophical Society The Bearer Mr. Gibbs full of Respect for your Character has not only the very natural Ambition of being introduced to your venerable Person but cherishes the Hope of obtaining your sage Counsel and your Patronage upon his Arrival in France with an Intention to establish himself there at least for some years. Your Philanthropy alone secures that Patronage to...
With Views of public Utility I again take the Freedom of covering to you some papers for Majr General Greene and am your Excellency’s Obliged humble Servant PHi : Etting Collection.
It is not improbable that the Enemy have a plan of cyphering their Letters which is pretty general among their Chiefs; if so, Your Excellency, will perhaps reap Benefit from making your Secretary take a Copy of the Keys and observations which I send to General Greene, through your Care. With every Wish for your Success and Glory, I am Your Excellencys Obliged & Humble Servant PHi : Gratz...
Under a Date of Aug. 24 I did myself the Pleasure to endeavour to convey to you later Information respecting your dear Connection in Holland than you had before received, but my Letter was with others carried to New York. Mr. Adams and Family were well May 28th; and he had a few Days before taken upon himself much more of public Character than at any prior Time. Instead of Lodgings he took an...
Supposing Col. Laurens to have arrived at Rh. Island, I was greatly chagrined when he told me he had no Letters for you; and I was searching his papers to pick from them all the Comfort I could, to be transmitted to Braintree, when I found he had landed at Boston and had sent you a Message of what Satisfaction he could furnish relative to your dear Partner and your Children. What I told you...
After giving a few Lines for you yesterday to the Commissary General of Prisoners who was going for Boston; I held Conversation with a Capt. Mason who had just landed from a Flag of Truce of Bermuda. He sailed from the Texel May 29 was taken close off the Capes of Delaware, after about 8 weeks passage and carried to the island from whence he is now arrived on parole to release another Captain...
I feared moths—have opened your Goods—aired and shook the Wollens—added good Tobacco leaves and again secured them for Transportation. I shall put Clamps to the Chest and send it to the Store of the Deputy Commissary General where Mr. Jno. Checkley will secure the first good public or private Carriage to Mr. Hughes or to Boston. I mentioned Gauze for Mr. Tufts. You say he misses some gauze...
I am too ill to write much. Your Ease of Mind is what I wish to promote by confirming what I have before said vizt. That Mr. A dams was greatly esteemed here tho’ we have an odd way of discovering it sometimes. He is sole Minister Plenipo to form a triple Alliance between Holland, France and these United States with Discretion to make it Quadruple by joining Spain—for the Purpose of our...
Herewith you will recieve according to the resolution of Congress of the 10 th such information relative to the surrender of Pensacola, and the subsequent arrival of the Garrison, at New York, as I have been able to obtain which you will make use of according to your discretion, and the Spirit of the enclosed resolution. I am Sir your Friend and very H Ser t . PS. 16 Aug It appears to me not...
I am persuaded to believe that I have acknowledged the Receipt of your Favor of June 30th tho it is not so endorsed. I think I recollect to have discovered my Unwillingness to persuade my dearest Friend, my affectionate, faithful, generous-spirited Maria to put herself in the Way of a Meeting with a Stranger prejudiced against me and perhaps prompt to utter her Prejudices. I am sure such Ideas...
I do not find by President Huntington’s Letter Book that he has forwarded the within Resolve of July 12th. respecting your Powers of Sept. 29th. 1779 therefore I take the Opportunity of two Vessels which are to sail in a few Hours, to communicate it doubly. The whole of the Proceedings here in regard to your two Commissions, are I think, Ill judged but I persuade myself no dishonour was for...
ALS : Historical Society of Pennsylvania; copies: National Archives, Historical Society of Pennsylvania; transcript: National Archives It does not appear that the Resolutions of June 26. affecting yourself & Colleagues as well as Mr. Dana have been transmitted. Mr. Presidt. McKean will take other Opportunities of Writing. I think it essential however in the mean time to forward duplicates...
The Dates of my Letters connected with the Time of the Receipt of yours are become somewhat essential towards a right Judgement of my Character, so much called in Question lately by the Censorious. Though John Paul Jones may not even yet have left the City you will sometime or other find what I wrote to go by a Mr. Anderson and afterward delivered to the said Chevalier Jones. You will also...