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I wish at this Time to waive the Expression of my Veneration of your Character, in a still-lively Hope that Providence will bless me with the Opportunity of attempting it by the united sincere Language of my Eyes & Lips; tho’ even that must prove inadequate. Personally a Stranger to you, my Sufferings have yet affected your benevolent Mind; and your Exertions in my Favor have made so deep an...
I address your Excellency upon a Matter greatly important in its Consequences to more than myself. And, though I am personally unknown to you, I shall proceed without any other Ceremony than just to beg you would not attribute my Abruptness to the Consideration of the Chanel by which my Letter will be conveyed, but to my Embarrassment in an Aim to express by Words, my real Veneration of your...
By the singular manner in which General Lee gives out his characterizing opinions Monsr Malmedy was exalted to a colonial rank in Rhode Island which will be a source of pain to him contrary to the intention of his mentioned zealous friend. Congress has aimed by passing over one continental gradation, from Major to Colonel, to lessen that pain to this Gentleman, who is high in his professions...
Mr. Gorham and Mr. Russel, Agents of the Town of Charlestown, have presented to Congress a Petition from the unfortunate Inhabitants of that Place, praying for a Compensation for their Losses. The Petition was drawn in very decent and handsome Terms, containing a lively Description of the Distresses to which the unhappy Petitioners are reduced, from a State of Ease and Affluence; and the...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I catch up my pen in haste: but, it is not that circumstance which makes me omit prefatorial apology, in this attempt to draw You into a literary correspondence. Difference of age and other differences vastly more important vanish, when I consider our relationship as “Friends to America.” And, I am conscious that the service of these United States is the...
This will be delivered to you by a German Officer who expresses much inclination to enter into the army under your command. The trouble which your Excellency receives from Foreigners commissioned by Congress has made the Committee, appointed to examine their pretensions, averse to offering any resolutions for places above the rank of subalterns. The Bearer speaks english very well, and has an...
As chairman of the Committee on foreign applications, I inclose herewith to your Excellency the only list which has come to hand from France, tending, in any manner, to discover the arrangement made there of the officers who lately arrived in the Amphitrite. Should it appear hereafter by any vouchers that some of them have a just claim by compact to higher commissions, Congress will attend to...
Two ALS : American Philosophical Society I think it my duty as an Individual to communicate to you some information which you may not perhaps receive in a more formal or authoritative way. The treaties made with the Chevalr. de Borre Mr. Du Coudray &c. &c. have given infinite trouble being inconsistent with each other, and all of them, except the one you signed with 4 Engineers, inconsistent...
So long ago as Decr 2d 1775, direction was given by Congress to the committee of secret correspondence to procure from Europe four good Engineers. This was not however accomplished till the 13th of last Febry When the bearer the Chevalier du Portail, with Mr La Radiere Mr Gouvion and one other Officer, who is left sick in the West indies, was engaged by Doctor Franklin & Mr Deane to come over...
It is probable that Genl. Howe will waste the fall of this year between Chesapeak Bay and Delaware River. I send you a copied sketch of part of the country to which the Gazettes will frequently refer; as I know You give singular attention to the interesting concerns of America in the present struggle. This knowledge is only part of the foundation of my affectionate esteem of you. Nor will I...
As the delivery of this Billet cannot be attended with the disagreable allarm which the amiable Mrs. Adams some time ago suffered from a well meant but indiscretely-managed little Compliment of one of her Admirers, I improve this fair opportunity to congratulate her, thus, upon the late happy events at Saratoga, greatly important to the Public and, consequently, interesting to her patriotic...
Tho I must refer you as well as Mr. Hancock to what I have written to Mr. S. Adams relative to the Business in Congress, and also omit at present general chit chat of Men Women and Things, yet one little Peice of History which is peculiarly adapted to your improving Fancy I must put down. Mr. Hancock’s Waggoner who went with Mrs. Hancock to Boston, after his Return to Germantown his Home...
It appears by Returns this day received from Genl. Gates that Burgoine must have destroyed his Standards and almost every other military Trophy during the Capitulation. Not one Musket fit for use was delivered, not one Scabbard to a Bayonett or Cutlass. We are told that instead of piling the Arms the Enemy chose to ground them, that the Waggons might more certainly crush them. Gates does not...
We have this Evening a Letter from Mr. Bingham of Octr. 13th. in which he tells us that the french General had received a Packet by a Boat which left Rochelle Sepr. 4th. advising him of the destination of 5,000 Troops for Martinique the Transports being actually ready at Havre Nantes and Bourdeaux to take them on Board. An Embargo was to be immediately laid upon european bound Vessels to...
I shall not in my great hurry repeat to you any of the matters which I have written to Mr. S. Adams as you can have them, on sight of him. I expected Brother Geary would have written to you but he has just requested me to inclose two Letters which he opened in consequence of your orders; and to give his Compliments to you begging your excuse of his further silence as he is preparing to go on a...
As I was at the Secretaries yesterday I took off a few Resolutions from the Journals for your view, supposing as to the above, that you might have forgotten them, and as to the following, wishing to have your Sentiments. I doubt not you will think it may or may not be proper to take from the minds of foreign Courts the Idea that we are absolutely determind about our conduct towards Great...
With great pleasure to ourselves we discharge our duty by inclosing to you your Commission for representing these United States at the Court of France. We are by no means willing to indulge a thought of your declining this important service, and therefore we send duplicates of the Commission and the late Resolves, in order that you may take one sett with you, and send the other, by another...
Since my signing a letter to you with Colo. Lee an excellent opportunity of sending to France presented; and the Colonel in his way home has carried a Packet to Baltimore, which will go to the Commissioners in a swift sailing armed Vessel. No: 1 contained Triplicates of Letters dated Octr. 31st. Novr. 1st. and Novr 8th No. 2 A Letter of Decr. 1st. and Resolves respecting Frenchmen Sept. 8. 13....
Decr. 2d. Resolved that a Commission be made out for Mr. J. Adams similar to that heretofore granted to the Commissioners at the Court of France. The date of the Commissions upon the 27th. was an error of the Secretary. But He as well as the president and others think it of no consequence. In Congress Decr. 17th. 1777 Resolved that Genl. Washington be directed to inform Genl. Burgoyne the...
That you may excuse my vile manner of doing business, know that I am freezing in my little room this morning so that I can scarcely hold my pen, but, I am, here, in quiet. The sealed packet sent before contained Triplicates of Octr. 31st Novr. 1 and 8 which last were only an Introduction of the Bearer Col: Ewen, and an Annunciation of Mr. Laurens’s Election as President so that his Draughts...
After the Resolve for stopping Burgoyne had passed, some were of opinion that a State of Facts found by the Committee should have preceeded the reasoning. Perhaps you will judge that it is already too laboured a report. I inclose for your own use the State of Facts alluded to which did not enter into the business of Congress; but was only talked of. We have intelligence now that 2 Hoits...
Mr. Geary otherways engaged has given me the pleasure of forwarding this Intelligence from your friend Jefferson respecting the ready concurrence of the Dominion with the Articles sent lately to the States in a hope of cementing them together in a firm League. I am particularly rejoyced at this dispatch at this critical time when things appear almost desperate in this neighbourhood. As a...
A Course of Disappointments has attended the printing of the Journals of Congress. Good progress was indeed making in Sepr last when Mr Aitkin had nearly finished a second Volume with December 1776. This Work he has sent out of the city of Philadelphia, and buried. By all the Scrutiny I can make, I gain no other Knowledge about the Spot where the Books are deposited than a high probability...
The year is rendered quite pleasing to me, in its beginning, by the arrival of your favour of the 6th of december, which assures me you were then in health with your lovely family. May part of that happiness long continue! I say part, for I wish you may e’er long be in France, or, at York Town. Your aid has been greatly wanted upon a most important transaction. We have had a call for your...
First and foremost, become a reconciling advocate for me with your dear lovely Portia, who, from the most rational tender attachment to you, is as angry with me as her judiciously patriotic Spirit will allow, upon a foundation which I hope you have been acquainted with, long e’er this day. This hint must pass for an acknowledgement of the receipt of her letter of Decr. 19th. and for all the...
The receipt of your letters of Decr. 24th variously directed gave equal and uniform satisfaction here yesterday. There was an error in the date of the Commission but it is judged to be of no importance. I send all the dispatches to you open as before that you may be acquainted with the contents, in case you should forward them before you sail yourself. I will endeavour to send your Chest by...
York, February 1778. RC ( Adams Papers ). Believing that JA could receive yet another letter in addition to those of 8 and 10 Feb. (above), Lovell wrote to wish him a happy voyage and to give him “an idea of our intended Progress into Canada” by quoting resolutions passed by the congress on 22, 23, 24, and 28 Jan. and 2 Feb. To provide JA with an understanding of the kind of representation...
Yours of Janry. 9th is before me. Deane had inclosed to Congress a long minute corresponding history of what you sent me. He doubted whether Mr. R M had communicated to us what had been sent of the kind formerly therefore he wrote to him lately with flying seals under cover to the President. Mr. R M had been indiscreet in remarking to T.M. upon the Conduct of the Commissioners as not acting...
The week after Mr. C—— was appointed secretary, I saw the P.S. of a letter to Mr. S.A. in which he is said to be a very unworthy person, but he has so good a Character in the estimation of Congress and from Maryland Gentlemen, that I did not think proper to move for a power of Suspension to be given to the Commissioners, as I find it is the opinion of some here that the secretary should be...
I am to thank you, in my own name, and on the public account, for that exercise of laudable patriotic prudence, which you have modestly termed the “Freedom” of inclosing to me Mr. McCreary’s letter to your worthy Husband. I read it in Congress, and I think it will be useful to the commercial Committee. The same Gentleman wrote to Mr. Adams in Sepr. some interesting history, of which he gave me...
You will form a Judgement upon the following Extract of a Letter from the Honble Thos Cushing by weighing it with the various Intelligence which you receive from other Quarters. It has been long on the Road from the Difficulty of passing Hudson’s River where the Express left his Horse on the 11th of this month. Extract Mr Hancock having just informed me that he shall send off an Express...
A Gentleman belonging to Boston Capt. Fritz having arrived from France had intended himself the honor of waiting upon your Excellency in person to deliver the inclosed letter and several articles therein referred to. But having had a disagreable, hard journey from North Carolina, and finding that he is to expect worse in his approach to your Camp with his heavy loaded carriage & two or three...
When I tell you that no Credit is to be given to the late Report of an attempted Assassination of Doctor Franklin, you are not to attribute my Assertion to an Endeavour to give Relief, at all Adventures , to the anxious Mind of an amiable Sufferer. Had your Letters of the 1st. and 8th. of March reached me before this Morning, I could not have given you so much Satisfaction as at present. I...
This, with my affectionate wishes for your prosperity, may serve to acquaint you that Congress has this day resolved “That William Bingham Esqr. agent of the United States of America, now resident in Martinico, be authorized to draw bills of exchange at double usance on the Commissioners of the United States at Paris for any sums not exceeding in the whole one hundred thousand livres tournois,...
I promise myself much from the eight or nine scrawls which I have sent to you since your departure from America, in the spirit, I own to you, with which Indians make their presents of feathers or bark. I must depend upon your imagination to comprehend what I will not undertake to describe—our chagrin and perplexity at our total ignorance of the situation and transactions of the Commissioners...
In aid to your scrutiny after the real robber of the Commissioners Dispatches, I send what I think a good Confirmation of Folgiers honesty. By comparing the Governor’s letter with Folgier’s Examination you will find the Governor led into a mistake about the number of Seals broken, by Folgiers forgetting that the outside Cover of the whole had anything more than “Dispatches” wrote on it. He...
Our Affairs have now a universally good appearance. Every thing at home and abroad seems verging towards a happy and permanent period. We are preparing for either War or Peace; for altho we are fully perswaded that our Enemies are wearied beaten and disappoint in despair, yet we shall not presume too much on that belief, and the rather, as it is our fixt determination to admit no terms of...
I find it impossible to write to you at this Time so fully as I wish being greatly overplied with business from the neglect of others. I cannot however consent that Dispatches for France should go off without a line in Testimony of my personal attachment to you and in proof of remembrance of my promises; which kind of proof I have given 9 Times before since you left Boston. Ever, more uneasy...
ALS : University of Pennsylvania Library Your favour of Decr. 21st. I read in Congress that it might have the Operation which you benevolently generously and honourably intended. But really Sir, when you say you “perceive he (Mr. D———) has Enemies”, I am not inclined to determine that you form your Opinion upon the Proceedings of Congress alone, to which you refer in the Beginning of your...
As I hinted to you in my letter of yesterday, which goes by a different Vessel from what bears this, Half-pay for 7 years, if they live so long, is granted to the Officers who serve the War out. It was also resolved to give 80 Dollars to the Men in addition to their Land. The Commissioners at the Courts of Tuscany Vienna and Berlin are to have plenipotentiary Commissions and not to be...
I fear I omitted to send the Resolve of May 5th. with 3 past Packets. I shall be vexed if it does not reach you with the Ratifications as, on the Timing of it depends much of its Propriety. I was strangely betrayed by its having been dated the 4th. in a mistaken Alteration, when A.B.C. were sent Eastward. By Letters Yesterday from Mr. Beaumarchais I find Mr. Deane is probably on this Continent...
Amiable tho unjust Portia! doubly unjust!—to yourself, and to me. Must I only write to you in the Language of Gazettes, enumerating, on the Part of Britain, Acts of Deceit, Insolence and Cruelty; or, on the part of America, Instances of Patience under repeated Losses, Fortitude under uncommon Hardships, and Humanity under the grossest Provocations to Revenge? Must I suppress Opinion, Sentiment...
ALS : American Philosophical Society; copies: Library of Congress, National Archives (two) By a most unlucky Mistake I did not forward the Resolve of May 5th. with the Ratifications of the Treaties sent in that Month in the Packets A.B.C.; but I have sent them in D.E. via Martinique; and now forward them in F.G. via Boston, not allowing myself to wait for the Concurrence of the Committee in a...
The British Commissioners have arrived and transmitted their powers and propositions to Congress, which have received the answer you will see in the Pennsylvania Gazette of the 20th. instant. On the 18th. of this month Gen. Clinton with the British army (now under his command) abandoned Philadelphia, and the City is in possession of our Troops. The enemy crossed into Jersey, but whether with...
I have this Afternoon received your Favour of June 12th. and at the same Time a Gazette from Boston, of later Date, in which I find a pleasing Entry in Regard to Mr. Adams’s Arrival in France. It is so likely to be true from the blundering Manner of it that I venture to congratulate you upon it. Mr. Thaxter is not yet arrived here, but is expected hourly. He will heartily participate in the...
I heartily congratulate you upon the indubitable Proofs of our Friends Arrival in France. You might imagine that the Congress had received some important Intelligence in the large Packets sent lately from Boston, if I did not acquaint you that they were chiefly for Monsr. Girard who is not yet arrived. A french Fleet having sailed for America, an English One being ready to follow, and a second...
Yesterday the Letters of Portia of June 24th. and Augst. 19th. came to my hand together, by Post. The wishes expressed in the latter have made all the Impressions of the most pleasing Commands, and shall be strictly attended to upon the first possible Occasion of fulfilling them; which must, I think, be soon, tho the Embargo is not yet taken off. As to the former , I will not now make it the...
I have the Mortification of being obliged to tell the amiable Portia that the Council of Pensylvania will not grant a partial Exportation of Flour from their State while the general Embargo lasts: So that I cannot soon have the Pleasure of executing the Commission which that lovely Woman has entrusted to me. The State of Massachusetts Bay will have the Direction of a Quantity out of which the...
ALS and copy: American Philosophical Society; copies: National Archives (two), Library of Congress Congress having foreign Affairs now under Consideration, I shall not write to you on that Subject, more especially as it is quite uncertain how the present Papers will be conveyed to you. Nor shall I pretend to unravel to you the Designs of the Enemy. They are very inscrutable: The Printers know...
I was not a little surprized Yesterday at seing a Letter from you to Mr. S. Adams by Mr. Archer, in which you make no sort of Acknowledgement of any of my numerous Scrawls; 14 or 15 have at least gone on the Way to you. I have felt myself lately under the Necessity of letting you go by guess as to what we are doing here. Congress have the Papers of the Committee for foreign Affairs on their...