James Madison Papers
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Virginia Delegates to Benjamin Lincoln, and Benjamin Lincoln to Virginia Delegates, 1 April 1782

Virginia Delegates to Benjamin Lincoln, and
Benjamin Lincoln to Virginia Delegates

Copy (Virginia State Library). Made by Arthur Lee on a single page and enclosed in Virginia Delegates to Harrison, 2 April 1782 (q.v.).

In Congress April 1st. 1782

Sir,

The success of recruiting in Virginia will very much depend on the State having Arms & Clothing for the Men that may be raisd. We therefore beg you will inform us, what supply of these Articles the State may depend upon from your department.

We have the honor to be &c

To the Honble Maj. G. Lincoln } signd J. Jones
J. Madison
Minister at War A. Lee

Answer.

War-Office April 1st. 1782

I have this morning, Gentlemen, been honord with your favor of this date; intimating your wish, to be informd what supply of Arms & Clothing the State may depend on from the War department.

On the 1st. Sepr. last Congress took upon themselves the whole business of clothing the Army & made provision accordingly.1 As soon as the State of Virginia shall fix on a place of general rendezvous from which Recruits shall march to join the Army; an Officer of rank will be appointed to attend that post, to receive & forward them, to whom Clothing & Arms will be sent, on his return, from time to time, sufficient fully to clothe & equip the Troops2

I have the honor to be &c &c

signd    B. Lincoln

The Honble } Esqrs.
Jos. Jones
J. Madison
A. Lee

1On 18 June 1781 Congress resolved that “all state purchases of cloathing on continental account, and all state appointments and regulations in the cloathing department on continental account, be abolished on the first day of September” (JCC description begins Worthington Chauncey Ford et al., eds., Journals of the Continental Congress, 1774–1789 (34 vols.; Washington, 1904–37). description ends , XX, 663).

2According to the detailed regulations adopted by Congress on 18 June 1781, the clothier general would call upon the quartermaster general or the latter’s deputies in the several states to “furnish the means of transportation of all articles of cloathing from the places where imported, received, or purchased, to the places of deposit” (JCC description begins Worthington Chauncey Ford et al., eds., Journals of the Continental Congress, 1774–1789 (34 vols.; Washington, 1904–37). description ends , XX, 666). The legislation of 7 February 1781 establishing the Department of War obliged Lincoln to account for the disposition of weapons. Not until 24 July 1782 would Congress empower him to appoint and issue direct orders to the commissary of military stores (JCC description begins Worthington Chauncey Ford et al., eds., Journals of the Continental Congress, 1774–1789 (34 vols.; Washington, 1904–37). description ends , XIX, 126–27; XXII, 415).

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