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The commanding officers are applying for arms for the Musick—The donation of Arms to the Troops was in consequence of your Excellency’s recommendation should you be of opinion, all circumstances considered, they have a right to arms, I think no difficulty will arrise in Congress from the measure. I have requested General Knox to commence as soon as possible the build ing a Magazine on...
I was yesterday honored with your Excellencys favor of 8th instant announcing my change—an event extrem ely felicitating. The General Assembly of this common wealth is now sitting, the first on our new situation. Had I arrived fro m camp a few days sooner, I should probably have been honored wi th a seat among them. Though I am happy to inform your Excellency, that the Court are seriously...
From the present state of our finances, the temper and disposition of the several States in general and the little hope we have of farther aid from France–it becomes absolutely necessary to take a view of our present establishments and enquire whether any new arrangements can be made consistent with justice policy & the good of the service. I have therefore to offer to your Excellency...
So many difficulties attended the late mode of issuing provisions to Officers or their own returns, that when the new contract was entered into, the contractors would not agree to issue as they had formerly done, but requested that the number of rations which each Officer was entitled to draw might be ascertained—this induced the recommendation of the enclosed resolves of Congress by which the...
Letter not found: from Maj. Gen. Benjamin Lincoln, 3 July 1777. Charles E. Tuttle Co. of New York reportedly sold in 1951 an autograph letter signed “addressed to ‘His Excellency Gen. Washington’, regarding the march of General De Hoar’s brigade to Morristown to join the main army. Washington’s reply (as written by his adjutant T imothy P ickering ) is written at the bottom of Lincoln’s...
I was on the 12th instant honored with your letter of the 31st ultimo covering several papers. Those for New-Hampshire I cannot forward as the return of their Troops did not accompany them. As soon as it shall come to hand, which I may hourly expect, I will forward them to Colonel Dearborn, the only Officer I know in the State of New Hampshire now at home—from whose influence and attention...
I beg leave to inform Your Excellency that Congress have permitted the Lieutenants Epuilemat , Ferriol, and Boileau to retire from Genl Hazen’s regiment, to be considered on the Invalid establishment—and at present remain with their families. I have the honor to be, with profound respect, your Excellency’s obedt Servt DLC : Papers of George Washington.
I find from the Report of Colo. Barber, who is on Duty in York, that there are many Irregularities—the Enemy are yet issuing Stores, and a great Number of the Men are seen with two new Hats each—From the Appearance of the Baggage of the Officers he thinks all is not right. There are so many people crouding into Town that it is impossible to preserve it from Confusion. This cannot be prevented...
I was this day honored with your two favours of the 30th Ultimo, the returns and the papers inclosed in them have been laid before Congress. Captain Phelps petitioned Congress for leave to retire from the Invalid Regiment on the emoluments allowed to retiring Officers of the 3d and 21st October 1780, on which Congress passed the enclosed resolve. On the receipt of your Letter covering the...
I have just received a letter from Major Gordon of the 80th British Regiment in which he requests that Captain Asgill, who he says has been admitted Prisoner on Parole by your Excellency, may be permitted to go into New York and thence to Europe. If your Excellency should think the request admissible at this time I wish you would forward to him a passport. Major Gordon has requested leave for...
I was the last Evening honored with your Excellency’s Favor of Yesterday Afternoon—On the Receipt of it I applied to Colo. Dearborn Dy Qr Mr Gnl, to know what Number of Vessels were left, and what Number it would probably take to transport the French Artillery, Baggage, Sick, &c. On his Report I found it impossible to take Vessels enough for another Corps, and leave a Sufficiency for the...
I find by the report of an Officer, I sent to observe the state of the roads, by Bull’s Iron works & New Milford, to Litchfield (30 odd Miles) that some parts of the road are much out of repair—but that the bridges are passable—On this Road the Troops may halt well at the distance of nine Miles (Draper’s Tavern) next at Peets Mill 9 Miles, next at Stones over Mount Tom , 8 Miles after that, to...
I write by this opportunity rather from a desire to embrace it, than because I have any particular news to communicate. Since my last an exchange of prisoners has taken place, our private soldiers have been all liberated, and but few of our officers remain in the enemy’s hands; among them is Colo. Elbert of the 2d Georgia battalion. The enemy claim a Brigadier for him, he was appointed...
I do myself the honor to enclose your Excellency three resolves of Congress—one of April the 23rd, which I suppose had been forwarded at the time it passed—and two others of the 11 instant. I also enclose a copy of my letter to your Excellency of the 10th instt transmitted by the mail which was taken some days ago. When our troops retired from York town in Virginia a large quantity of Ordnance...
The late Board of War were by Congress impowered and directed to take depositions in the case of Major General Howe in support of complaints made against him by the Delegates of Congress from Georgia—The Board did not proceed far in this business, their powers now cease and this matter does not fall within my Commission. It appears to me that the shortest way of terminating this affair is by a...
LS : American Philosophical Society; copy: Archives du Ministère des affaires étrangères Congress has ordered me to prepare and lay before them a State of the pay Rations and Subsistence of the Officers and Men in the Armies of the different powers in Europe—as these often vary I have no means of procuring the necessary information with accuracy from any books I have seen— I am under the...
On revolving in my mind the subject of making suitable provisions for the Invalid Officers as you recommended, I find many difficulties will attend our making that provision for them to which the services and sufferings of some of them entitle them, without doing that for others, which in justice they can have no pretentions to—I should be much obliged by your thoughts on a System which will...
I am requested, my dear General, by Mr Izard to represent to your Excellency that the Citizens of South–Carolina, who had made arrangements for returning to their State in flags to be furnished by the British Commander in Chief, are extremely anxious to learn whether those flags will be granted, and when—for this purpose they wish that your Excellency would please to renew the application to...
Letter not found: from Maj. Gen. Benjamin Lincoln, 13 April 1777. In his letter to Hancock of 12–13 April, GW writes: “13th I have this Moment recd a line from Genl Lincoln informing me that the Enemy attempted to surprize him, early this morning, at his post at Bound Brook, but he made good his Retreat to the pass of the Mountains just in his Rear, with trifling Loss.”
I have the honor to inclose the arrangement of the Virginia line—I suppose it to be right—Your Excellencys approbation of it is however necessary before it can be recorded in this Office—if you approve it the arrangement may remain with you as I have a Copy of it. I wish your Excellency’s opinion on the subject soon—as the Officers are applying for their subsistance. The materials for turning...
I have been honored with your favor of the 24th covering two letters, under flying seals, one to Genl Greene & the other to General Mulenburg. I shall request General Greene, if he thinks proper to send any troops Northward this fall, to send on those I mentioned to your Excellency. Some time since, I ordered a contract for forage, for Colo. Armands corps, to be made at Winchester, on a...
The night before last Captain Ludlow of the guards, came to this City with letters for General Carleton soliciting his attention to Captain Asgill of the guards—the person to whose lot it falls to suffer for the crimes of others. Major Gordon is here with Capt. Asgill and wishes to attend him into the Jersies as his friend—they will leave this City this evening or in the morning—The Officers...
On the evening of the 25th ulto I received information, at Charles-Town, that the enemy had arrived with upwards of twenty ships at Tybee, near the mouth of the river, Savannah, and in a harbour south of the river. The few troops at Charles-Town were immediately put in motion, and marched for Georgia; On my way, I met an express, from General Howe, who was in Georgia, informing that on the...
By the enclosed copy of a Resolve, your Excellency will observe that Congress have referred to you the determination of the questions, what Officers shall be allowed servants and what Number of them. I have daily applications from Officers for order, empowering them to draw rations for their servants. I have delayed issuing any orders to the Contractors, as I do not know who, nor what number...
Nothing My dear General very new or material has taken place, since I did my self the honor to address your Excellency under the 26th. However I cannot omit so good an opportunity as offers by this express, to inform you that the recruiting service goes on well, and that there is good reason to hope our battalions will soon be filled up. The matter of clothing the army is of such importance,...
One of the Hessians left their camp at the landing this afternon, his account of their numbers & situation is very simelar to that we have often had from others. He informs there are no appearances of removing at present, they are waiting for a reinforcment which they daily expect—That the treatment they receive is so very different from what they expected, & so injurious, (were promised 16d....
A Colonel Connelly was under your Excellencys parole and has left Virginia with out your permission. I have thought it necessary to send the inclosed for your inspection-- Connelly is now in this City. I have the honor to be Dr sir with the greatest esteem your most Obedient servant DLC : Papers of George Washington.
By the latest accounts from the West Indies there is the highest probability that the French will have a decided naval superiority the Ensuing Campaign To detain their whole fleet on that Station in the hurricane months would be placing a great part of the marine of France in a situation too hazarduous, while the will being of that Nation depends so much on it’s safety—That it will return...
Letter not found: from Maj. Gen. Benjamin Lincoln, 22 Oct. 1779 . GW wrote Lincoln on 12 Dec.: “I had the pleasure of receiving yours of the 22d October.”
I am sensible the State of Massachusetts Bay are determined, to use every vigorous exertion, to raise their proportion of the Continental army—It is my indispensable duty, to promote their determination. I am conscious, many good men, from the militia of that State now in camp, might be engaged, were they indulged a furlough, on their enlistment. But, as the design of the Court, in sending out...