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In obedience to the direction of the General Assembly I transmit a copy of the resolutions passed by that honorable body respecting the late unexpected decision of the supreme Court of the United States which asserts that Court’s right of Jurisdiction in all controversies wherein a State may be a party, and I flatter myself that the request of the General Assembly will receive from you firm...
I had the honor this moment to receive from the mail just arrived (Interrupted by the vast fall of rain) your l[ett]er of the 11th. My anticipation of the necessity of information to you On the point trusted to me, induced me to expend my own money to secure to my letr a timely reply—th[e] substance was instantly forwarded to you, which I hope reached you soon after your ler of the 11th was...
This letr. is written purposely to inform you of the project mentioned to you in New york concerning the land at the Great falls. The quantity is 500 acres, the price may be called 4,000£ with the incumbrance of an annual rent of 150£ sterling. The advantages infinitely exceed that of any spot of ground in the U. States. The canal runs thro the land, & the bason is in the land, the situation...
Letter not found: from Henry Lee, 28 June 1757. On 30 June 1757 GW wrote to Lee: “I have received yours of the 28th instant.”
The inclination which I expressed to you several years ago, in 1823 I believe, to devote myself to the cultivation of letters, still besets me, & I have been fortunate enough to select a subject which is capable of receiving and conferring ⟨imperishable?⟩ honour. Whether I shall be able to do it justice is a question which labour, patience, diligence, & the inspiration of the historic muse,...
Forced to meander on my ride home to close as far as I could the various matters which I considered under my care I never got to Richmond until the 29th. when Col. Carrington gave to me your favor of the 19th Decr. I am sure you understand too well my conviction of your constant efforts to give comfort to the late army with me, to suppose that I could for a moment impute to want of exertion in...
I am unwilling that my enthusiasm in favour of your university should not be effectively known to you, I therefore take occasion, even at the risk of tasking your condescension & patience, to mention that in addition to M r Wallace who is now at the university, the two Browns, Richard & Frederick, are removed from the college here, & are to be sent at my instance, from to the University. I...
I have just returned from Newark, where I Completed the business your Exccelly committed to me. The virtuous serjeant deserted last night, I saw the two in newark this day. This night they go to york. Desertion among us is a a stranger; my officers are very attentive, & some of them men of nice discernment, this leads me to apprehend they will discover that the Serjeant is on some secret...
Doctor Wellford having conducted the medical department of the Militia Army in 94, I owe it to my sense of his faithful services, to comply with his wish of my letter to you notifying his desire to conduct one branch of the same department in the Army now raising. But I am sure you so well know this gentlemans character & ability that any commendation of him to you is needless. Nevertheless...
In my last I told you that I had contrived to get an unsuspected private friend to hire an express to carry a le[tte]r from me to Mr. H. as I found waiting for private conveyances too tedious. I have this moment reced his reply, after expressing himself very anxious indeed, to evidence (especially at the present crisis) by some public act his attachment to you & after declaring his sense of my...
I trust you have got back to New York where I hope among many delights which will encircle you, may be the leisure necessary to attend to distant friends. I very much wish to derive for a good purpose a piece of information which you only can give. If you feel yourself at liberty to do so in the strictest confidence pray impart to me the authors of the several pieces of publius. This you can...
It belongs to me to try to aid those I esteem & who stand in need of it. Such is the case with Mr. Clark. He was with me the other day & really I think yr. law officer has treated him out of the way. Mr Rodney talked of returning directly & promised as soon as he did return to finish his affair. Now he writes he shall not return till called for by the P. In this condition what can Mr C do,...
Having a few moments only to devote, you must be satisfied with a very laconic letr. Such is my distance from the line of posts, that to use it, I must avail myself of accidental conveyances, which are often like the present, sudden. It is with real Grief I inform you that by a late vote of the assembly of Virga. on a collateral question, they have manifested hostility to the new constitution....
After the notification of my disgrace which reached me about the 20th. Novr. I hastened from N York & pressed forward to my home. Every difficulty of weather and roads opposed my progress and retarded us effectually, for it took us three weeks to reach this place which I had reckoned on accomplishing in twelve days. At Length we arrived on the banks of potomac, and thro our avidity to embrace...
Some few days after my late domestic calamity which stings me to the quick, I left this place on a visit to the southwestern frontier in obedience to the dutys of my present office, & therefore never got your letr. of July 22d. until my return. It would not have been in my power to have made the trip you suggest, altho my desire of seeing you would have been a powerful incitement. From the...
Letter not found. 11 November 1786. Mentioned in JM’s letter to Lee of 23 November 1786 . Concerned Lee’s sense of injury at being dropped by the Virginia legislature from the state delegation to Congress, and the “deriliction of the friendship” between JM and Lee because of JM’s being elected, so Lee thought, in his place ( Lee to JM, 20 Dec. 1786 ).
I am willing to guarantee the land as you may choose, provided you will agreable to the spirit of our bargain secure my payment for the horse in Kentucky lands, should those sold to you prove insecure or doubtful in title. You have alone or in conjunction with Mr Lewis a tract of land near Suffolk, which if you incline to sell I shall be glad to negotiate for. I must trouble you to forward to...
Since your illness at Georgetown I have heard nothing of you, only that you had so far recovered as to proceed, until yesterday, when a gentleman from Alexandria told me that you had taken your seat in Congress. This information gave me pleasure, as it seemed to communicate your complete recovery, as well as because it assured me that you was executing your duty at a time which seems big with...
Mr Custis presented me with yr letr last night. Be assured I shall offer you no property not clear in title unless I may be imposed on, to prevent which am I here daily engaged in exploring the truth. I have a tract of land near gunston recd from W. Steptoe at valuation for money lent to him some years past. this I propose to offer among other property all of which will be submitted to you...
I enclose for yr. confidential perusal the letr. on which was founded mine to the P. As I said last night, my answer much in the way, as you suggested is deemed I presume satisfactory. I also enclose the Ps. note to me with an endorsement which please to sign if not disagreeable. It is the only document I hold to support the assurances contained in my answer. I return the passport, as it not...
I now dispatch one of the youths I had some time ago the honour to mention to you, whose qualifications are less extended than those of the other two , but whose preparations for movement are more foward. His name is Robert Wallace, & his birth place the county of King George—though I know not that it is important to say, “to whom ( he is ) related, or by whom begot.” His age exceeds 16...
Whenever I ask your aid to the promotion of the wishes of my friend, receive it on this express condition, that the public good must combine with the views of the gentlemen recommended. Very happy in the appointent [ sic ] of my old fellow soldier Lindsay to the vacancy occasioned by Mr. Parkers election, I desire only to entreat your attention to his compeer Mr. M. Livingston, should it be...
I have your letter of the 29h. Frenau’s Gazette you mention has not reached me, nor indeed have I for two mails got any papers from him. This precariousness in the reception of his paper will cramp the circulation of it. For which I am exceedingly sorry as it is rising fast into reputation. Innes is so pleased with the attention of the editor to political matters and to the independence...
your late orders for a detachment of militia & proclamation give birth to a variety of sensations & opinions. All good citizens deplore the events which have produced this conduct on your part, & feel but one determination to maintain inviolate our happy government at the risk of their lives & fortunes—there are some among us from the influence of party spirit & from their own ambitious views...
I cannot with-hold from you what my heart so imperiously orders. The public good & yr. honor alike enjoin the measure if I am not in gross error. As you did in my presence hold back yr. general from offence, in like manner hold back yr. ships of war & privateers—give some time to hear from the enemy especially as the singular event lately occurred in England & the growing disposition there for...
My business has yet detained me here. Three days ago I returned from a visit to the great falls where Genl. Washington was to have met me. The rain stopped him & the other directors, which to me was a mortifying disappointment as I entertained hopes with their aid to have concluded amicably & advantageously the dispute with Mr Fairfax. This is in train, tho the prospect is not the most...
As soon after my hearing of your return to Mt Vernon as I could, I sat out for a visit to you, but unfortunately your stay at home was so short that I could not see you. I had reached Stafford court house when I accidentally learned that you had departed on the previous sunday, and on knowing this I instantly turned back from whence I came. This disappointment would have always been mortifying...
The papers necessary to our European project are enclosed herewith—viz my power of attorney, your remarks which are so full that I can add nothing, the old plot of the canal which must be kept by you, and a copy sent, it being not fit—& my letr. to Mr. Jefferson. The last explains fully the manner which appeared to be best for us to embrace, but should any thing be improper, you can pass it...
Too often am I obliged to intrude on your time, which I assure you I very reluctantly do, as I well know how much the business of others avocate your attention from your own concerns. But the importance of the business which I wish to receive your aid in, I hope will be deemed in some degree an apology. Mr Madison & myself have determined to make sale of part of our joint property at the great...
In addition to my letr of this day, I beg leave to ask yr. attention to some matters which very much concern myself, & to which I have long desired to call the appropriation of a few moments of yr. time. Shortly after I had the honor of an interview with you in Albermarle, I learnt from General Porterfield that you had mentioned to some of yr. acquaintance, that I had offered for sale Mr....