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Documents filtered by: Author="Lee, Henry" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency"
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H. Lee has had the honour to receive Mr. Madison’s note of the 22nd April, and is glad to learn that the perusal of the volume transmitted by Mr. Garnett, is to be preceded by the study of that which it attempts to review. He hopes that either may requite the attention Mr Madison may bestow on it, and to lessen the demerit of the former, takes the liberty of inclosing a printed paper, which...
Although I may not wish to be known , I expect to be reputed as the authour of the inclosed prospectus —which from its connection with American literature and politics presents an humble claim, to the notice of Mr. Madison, who has so much advanced and illustrated both these important subjects. I should be so much pleased to obtain his sentiments in regard to its style & principles that I am...
As the reputed authour of a rejected address which was reported to the Jackson Convention in this town, I take the liberty of forwarding for your perusal a correct copy of it —a step that seems proper as parts of your publick conduct, & points of the constitution, are touched upon in the paper. As the paper was prepared at the request of the committee & its tone attempered by the wishes of...
It is, you must allow, very natural that any inquirer into the meaning of the constitution, should desire to have his conjectures, approved or corrected by yourself. I therefore take the liberty of forwarding for your consideration the enclosed paper, and shall be proud to hear that it receives in any degree the approbation of a chief architect of our political temple. Without daring to press...
The inclination which I expressed to you several years ago, in 1823 I believe, to devote myself to the cultivation of letters, still besets me, & I have been fortunate enough to select a subject which is capable of receiving and conferring ⟨imperishable?⟩ honour. Whether I shall be able to do it justice is a question which labour, patience, diligence, & the inspiration of the historic muse,...
I felt myself pleased and honoured by your letter, & shall avail myself of the earliest stage of maturity that my materials may present, to impose on your politeness and patience in the manner you seem to prefer. Genl. Armstrong has also been liberal & encouraging but I am fearful of his competition, knowing that I must be content with the second place. But I aim at truth & truth has charms...
In examining the events of the late war I believe I have ascertained that when in the fall of 1813, it became obvious that the campaign in the North would terminate in the disgrace of promising much and doing nothing, the govt projected a plan for the operations of the ensuing year, of which the principal feature was to assemble a large force just within the limits of Canada, and near the...
For your letter of the 16th. Feby I now beg leave to express my thanks, and shall take occasion shortly to add some observations, with a view of getting further information on parts of it. I have recd such high recommendations of the bearer Mr. Clarke, an English Gentleman who is travelling for health & information; and have concieved such sincere esteem for him from an intimate acquaintance...
In tracing the conduct and character of Genl. Jackson I have had a correspondence with Genl. Armstrong upon the subject of the provisional order to Genl. Jackson of the 18th. July 1814—authorising him on certain conditions to take possession of Pensacola. It appears that order was not recd. until after the peace, on or about the 14th. March of 1815. The circumstances under which it was recd....
To ensure your well-pleased extension of the usual kindness of your hospitality to Mr. Alfred Langdon Elwyn (the bearer of this note) I have only to mention that he is the grandson of the great patriot of New Hampshire, with whose public & private virtues you <...> doubtly familiar. Returned from a long and studious residence in England & France, he is desirous of seeing our university, and of...