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Mr. Reuben Burnley, having been for some time past, a Clerk in the Commissioners Office for stating the Accounts of Virginia against the United States, is desirous of continuing at the seat of the general Government after the business in which he is at present engaged, is completed, and to be employed in the Office of the Secretary of State, should Mr. Jefferson accept the appointment. As that...
Philadelphia, 17 Apr. 1792 . John Roney, a former lieutenant in the Virginia line of the Continental Army, and Michael Ford, who was trained in a merchant’s counting house and writes a very good hand, both clerks to the Commissioner of Loans for Virginia who were formerly in the office of the Commissioner of Accounts for that state, regard their employment as precarious and wish to obtain...
The many instances of politeness and indulgence I received from you, during my continuance in your office, demand my sincere acknowledgments. There are some of them, in particular, which conferred the highest obligations, and will ever be remembered with sentiments of gratitude and respect. I have reason to suppose, that the arrangements which will probably be made in the office of the Clerk...
I have the honor to enclose a letter to me from Mr. Beckley , which, as it fully explains the motive of my coming to this place, will probably have more weight than any thing I could say for myself, should a vacancy happen in any of the Executive departments which I might be thought competent to fill without interfering with the pretensions of others who may have a better claim than myself....
I have the honor to transmit to you some calculations I have lately made for determining the longitude and latitude of a place near the President’s house in this city, and have endeavored not only to render the work as accurate as I could from the elements assumed, but also to make it so plain that any person acquainted with the principles of astronomy cannot fail to understand it.—If you...
I had the honor to receive this morning, with the high respect it deserves, your very friendly and polite communication of the 22d. instant. Since I submitted to you the result of my calculations, I have ascertained with a degree of precision which may be confidently relied on, the latitude of the place of observation, which I find to be 38.° 53.’ 30.9", or in whole numbers 38.° 53.’ 31." from...
I beg leave again to submit to your inspection, some calculations for ascertaining the latitude and longitude of the Capitol in this place, according to methods which have been suggested by yourself. It is my intention to have a number of copies printed at my own expense, by Mr: Samuel H. Smith; but I shall not commit myself so far, until I obtain the opinion of a competent judge of the...
The inclosed copies of calculations relative to the latitude and longitude of the Capitol in this city, are offered to your acceptance. If the liberty I have taken of dedicating the work to you, without asking your permission, be considered presumptuous or improper, I beg that the high estimation in which your talents and character are justly held, may be received as my apology. This edition...
§ From William Lambert. 23 December 1805, Washington. “Being now out of the service of the House of Representatives, and desirous of being employed in such a manner as that I may be useful to the public, allow me, Sir, to enquire whether I may be considered as an applicant for a station in your department, that I may be deemed competent to fill with propriety, whenever a vacancy occurs,...
Having constructed a table on the same principles with the inclosed, to every quarter of an hour between 0 and 12 hours, for bishop Madison, of Virginia, I request your permission to present this to you, extended to a less interval, and accompanied with a rule to reduce even that interval to one minute of time:—the odd seconds may be found by simple proportion. If it is favorably received by...