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J’ai recu votre lettre, cher colonel, et j’y aurois repondu plutôt si l’absence de la flotte ne m’avoit pas mis hors d’etat de vous parler d’autre chose que de ma bonne volonté, dont je ne crois pas avoir besoin de vous assurer. Mais j’ai vu Mr le Cte d’estaing, et je puis à present vous parler en son nom. La veneration, la tendresse qu’il a pour notre cher general, joint au sentiment que vous...
Ne suis je pas bien malheureux, cher colonel, on me pousse pour aller à boston, on me chasse de Rhode island, ils n’ont ni repos ni patience que je ne sois parti, et le même jour que je m’absente est le seul où j’aurois du, où j’aurois voulu etre dans l’isle. Le diable en veut dans ce moment à tous les francois; heureusement que je viens de l’attrapper car à force de courir je suis arrivé à...
Mons. Nevile allant en france, mon cher hamilton, j’espere que vous ne Negligeres pas cette occasion de m’ecrire. Le soin qu’on prendra de votre lettre et la discretion avec laquelle elle me sera remise doivent vous engager à me parler librement sur toutes sortes d’articles. Cest à vous que je m’en Rapporte pour tous les intelligences, et toutes les Connaissances de vos affaires Militaires et...
I wish, my dear Hamilton, you will please to invite your father in law to come and dine tomorrow with me. Mr Duane has engag’d he would do me that honor. I Beg you will also come. Be so kind as to write to me if any intelligence is come to hand, and when the General has determin’d to leave this place. Don’t forget what I told yesterday to you. I request, my dear Sir, you will Beg the General...
In Consequence of our Conversation, My dear Hamilton, I have wrote a letter to Gouvion the Copy of which you will find herein inclosed. By the influence of the Same that you know of I have found a faithful Canadian officer who lately got an order from me for a Coat, and was Returning a foot to West point. I gave him the letter, and send him to You that he May have an order for a horse. If the...
These are, my dear Hamilton, two letters By which I communicate to the french general the happy intelligence Concerning the taking of the Convoy, and inclose to them the paper that Relates the affair as well as the success of the expedition on the Spanish Main. I give you joy, my dear friend, on this success of the Combin’d fleet, and Might also Rejoice with you on some thing else By way of...
Inclosed, my dear hamilton, I send you a letter for M de Marbois wherein are contain’d two exemplaires of my dispatches to doctor franklin. In the hurry of our Arrangement I forgot to mention them to the General. Be pleased to give him a Summary of theyr contents to which I have added the Southern News of Yesterday; tell him that knowing from experience how Negligent we were in sending...
Here I arrived last night and am going to set out for Philadelphia. Gouvion goes strait to New Windsor and by him I write to the General, I speak of Hand & Smith whom I recommend and add— “If however you was to cast your-eye on a Man who I think would suit better than any other in the World Hamilton is, I confess the officer whom I would like best to see in my .” Then I go on with the idea...
On the first days of your Arrival at Albany I dare say you had Nothing to do with Any Body’s letters. But I will now Become the Bolder in interrupting your Amorous Occupations as exclusive of other Motives the importance of the Matters I have to Mention may Countenance your indulging your dear self with some Minutes Respite. You may therefore, my good friend, Catch this opportunity of taking...
Where is, for the present, My Dear Hamilton? This question is not a mere affair of Curiosity; it is not even wholly owing to the tender sentiments of my friendship. But motives both of public and private nature conspire in making me wish that your woe be not accomplished; perhaps are you at Head quarters, perhaps at Albany. At all events I’ll tell you my History. Had the french fleet come in...
You are so sensible a fellow that you Can Certainly Explain to me what is the Matter that New York is given up, that our letters to france go for nothing, that while the french are coming I am going; this last matter gives great Uneasiness to the Minister of france. All this is not Comprehensible for me, who Having Been long from Head Quarters Have lost the Course of Intelligences. Have You...
I have Been long Complaining that I had Nothing to do and want of employment was an objection I had to my going to the Southward. But for the present, my dear friend, my Complaint is quite of an opposite nature, and I have so many Arrangements to make, so many difficulties to Combat, so many Ennemies to deal with that I am just that much of a general as will make me an Historian of...
However Silent You May please to Be, I will Nevertheless Remind You of a friend who loves You tenderly and who By His Attachment Desires a Great share in Your Affection. This letter, My dear Sir, Will Be delivered or sent By Count de Segur, an intimate friend of Mine, A Man of Wit and of Abilities, and whose Society You will Certainly Be pleased With. I Warmly Recommend Him to You, and Hope He...
How it Happens that I still am in Paris, I Hardly Can Myself Conceive and What is More Surprising, there are two frigates Going, Neither of Which Will Carry Your friend to America. Don’t think However, dear Hamilton, I Am So Much Alterd as to Be Kept Here By pleasure or private Affairs. But in the present Circumstances the American Ministers Have insisted Upon My Remaining some time longer at...
With all the warmth of my long and tender friendship I Congratulate You Upon the Birth of Your daughter, and Beg leave to present Mrs Hamilton With my most Affectionate Respects. Several delays Have Retarded the Oppening of the treaty and When I was Upon the Ground, it Has Been found that my influence with the Indians Both friendly and Hostile tribes, was much Greater than the Commissioners...
Every step I move there Comes upon me a Happy Necessity to Change my plans. The Reception I met with in Boston no Words Can describe—at least it is impossible to Express what I Have felt. Gratitude as well as propriety Conspired With all other inducements to keep me Here Some time longer. Rhode island and New Hampshire I must visit—and intend embarking By the first or second day of next month...
Altho I have just now writen to McHenry Requesting him to impart My Gazette to you, a very barren one indeed, I feel within myself a Want to tell you I love you tenderly. Your Brother Church Has sailed for America since which I Had a letter from His lady who is in very good Health. By an old letter from our friend Greene I Have Been delighted to find He consents to send His son to be educated...
It is an Age since I Heard from you. Of you I Hear By some of our friends, and in the News Papers. But altho I Have a Right to Complain, I want to let you know the proceedings of our Assembly, which as it is Unusual in France, May Raise Your Curiosity. Our Constitution is pretty much what it was in England Before it Had Been fairly writen down, and Minutely preserved; so that we Have great...
While you Have Been Attending your Most Important Convention, debates were also Going on in france Respecting the Constitutional Rights, and Matters of that kind. Great Reforms are taking place at Court. The Parliaments are Remonstrating, and our provincial Assemblies Begin to pop out. Amidst Many things that were not Much to the purpose, some Good principles Have Been laid out, and altho our...
It is a Hard thing for me to Be separated from the friends I love the Best, and to think that our daily Conversations are Reduced to a few letters, the Arrival of Which is ever lengthy and sometimes Uncertain. I Hope, However, My dear friend, you don’t question My Continual and Affectionate Remembrance of the Happy days I Have Past With You. I Hope You often think of me, and of the pleasure...
As my former letters have already given, and you shall in posterior ones find a regular account of every thing relating to me, give me leave to-day to confine myself to one very interesting object, which being highly momentous to the future welfare of gal. dumas, & his brother, cannot be considered as foreign to me, & has of course a right to your attention. Dumas himself has during the war...
Your Letter of the 28th April Has Safely Come to Hand, My dear Hamilton. The Intelligence Respecting Beaumarchais’s affair Has Been Communicated to dumas. His Answer I Have Not Yet Received, But Can Anticipate His Hearty Thanks for your Interest in His Behalf, at the Same time that you most Affectionately Speak of the Kind Reception which awaits me in America, you Cannot, Says you, in the...
Mde de fleury widow to our Gallant friend Having Imparted to me Her Intention to Adress the Governement of the United States, is pleased to think that Letters from me, and one particularly to you, Might Serve Her purpose. I am Sure the American Citizens, and Above all our Brother Soldiers, Need Not Being Reminded of the Brilliant and Useful Service Which the Late General fleury Had the...
I Have not, Since my Return to france, Received a Line from you—yet I am Sure you are affectionately interested in every Account Which Concerns me. The departure of Mr pichon for the United States affords me a Good Opportunity to write. He Has much pleased me by His eager wishes and Useful Exertions for a Reconciliation Between Both Countries. He Speaks of America and Americans in terms...
I would like by this opportunity to write to you a long letter, but having been Laying on my back for two months past, and being for three weeks to come, doomed to the same situation, I must confine myself to a few lines written near my bed. The particulars of the accident and his cure will be given to you by General Bernadotte, whom I must particularly introduce and his lady to Mrs. Hamilton...
What is the matter with my dear Hamilton and by what chance do I live in fruitless expectation of some lines from him? Does it begin to be the play in your, or rather in our Country, to take European airs, and forget friends as soon as they have turned their heels—Indeed my good friend I cannot help being somewhat angry against you, which makes into my heart a ridiculous fighting between love...
[ Light Camp, New Jersey, October 30, 1780. Letter listed in dealer’s catalogue. Letter not found. ] ALS , sold by C. F. Libbie and Company, Boston, December 12, 1895, Item 312.
As I am writing By a Gentleman Who goes through England and Carries my letter Himself, I shall Content Myself with inclosing the Copy of Some favourable Arrangemens of Commerce —and Reminding You of Your loving, grateful, and devoted am My dear Hamilton Yours for Ever My Best Respects to Mrs Hamilton. ALS , The Sol Feinstone Collection, Library of the American Philosophical Society,...
What is the matter with my dear hamilton And By what chance do I live in fruitless expectation of Some lines from him? does it begin to be the way in your, or rather in our Country to take European Airs, and forget friends as soon as they have turn’d theyr heels—indeed, My Good friend, I Cant help being Some what angry Against you, which shakes into My heart a Ridicu⟨lous⟩ fighting between...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I hope my Letter will Reach your excellency soon enough as to prevent your going to versailles for our propos’d meeting— I will not yet wait on the king and his Majesty’s orders are to stay in paris without seeing a great Number of Acquaintances— I confess I can’t help much approving his wisdom on this Respect that Many people have already propagated...
AL : American Philosophical Society I had promis’d myself, my good friend, that I would have the pleasure of embracing You this Morning—but they Write me from Versailles that I must be at the King’s Levee Before seeing any Body of the Royal family, and that Levee I understand to be at 11: Clock—in our kingly Countries we have a foolish law Call’d Etiquette that any one tho a Sensible man, must...
ALS : S. Howard Goldman, Weston, Connecticut (1989) Inclos’d I have the honor to send a letter which I beg leave to Reccommend to your excellency that (if possible) Mr Blodget Might obtain the leave of Coming to Paris— I am just Going to Versailles, and if you have any Commands for me they shall ever be well Come. With the highest Regard and sincerest affection I have the honor to be Dear Sir...
ALS : Dartmouth College Library I Am very Sorry it was not in My power to wait on Your excellency this Morning but I was oblig’d to Ride with the Queen at a partie of pleasure in the Bois de Boulogne— I saw yesterday the first and other Ministers and Spoke to them about the Necessity of Giving you Monney for fulfilling the engagements taken in Bills of exchange—that they Became pretty Sensible...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I am just Coming from Versailles where I went à hunting with the king, and I Do take this first opportunity of inquiring for the state of your health— I hope you are free by this time from your troublesome Gout— I make no doubt but that you knew last Night of the Senegal being taken by our troops— that Advantage I think is interesting for the Allied powers,...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I went yesterday to pay My Respects to your Excellency, and waïted as long as it was in My power— I wanted telling you that I hope the Expedition will be fix’d upon but the scale yet lessened— So that we Can’t do so much as was expected, but however some advantage May be got by this little incursion—Mr de Maurepas thinks it highly Necessary to Converse with...
ALS : American Philosophical Society Inclos’d I have the honor to Send you a letter from Mons. de Gimat giving an account of a very dangerous division Betwen the officers of the Alliance—that I had foreSeen long ago, and I believe Some thing or other Must be done, in this affair. I also send you the ideas for prints I have Somewhat increas’d, and I Could indeed Make out an immense Book upon so...
AL : American Philosophical Society I have just now Receiv’d a letter from the President of Congress which I think Should be in Compagny with Many others— I therefore wish to know before My departure when did the pacquet sail from America, what kind of ship she was, what News or what people she brought with her— that I do’nt only desire as an american citizen who wants to hear from his...
AD (draft): Library of Congress 1. The Burning of Charleston (Date) A fine Town by the Waterside, being a Port, but without any Defence. A Spire rising among the Houses, belonging to the House of Worship. A Belfrey belonging to the Town House all in Flames.— The Inhabitants had all left it. 2. The Burning of Falmouth (Date Nov. 1775) A fine Town & Port, but without Defence Ships firing hot...
ALS : American Philosophical Society How happy I feel, when surrounded By so many preparations Against England, My respected friend doctor franklin will easily conceive— There is nothing to be found in france which might offer to me so delightfull a prospect, as those ships, troops, warlike stores of all Kinds which are Getting Ready for to visit our good neighbours—Every thing will be soon...
ALS : American Philosophical Society With the Greatest pleasure I hear that By a frigatte just arriv’d at Brest you may have Got some news from America—how far my heart is Concern’d in any thing that may happen to My American fellow Citizens, I need not telling to You— I therefore entreat you, My good friend, to let me know Any public or private, important or insignificant intelligence you...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I have done myself the honor of writing to you some days ago, my dear doctor, and with a friendly impatience I waït for your answer— There are arriv’d some vessels from our Country which have certainly Brought Accounts of American affairs— By the french Consul at Boston I have Got a parcel of newspapers But no letters from My friends are yet come to hand—...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I wish it was in My power to Give you any intelligences, But however Great are our preparations, however superior we find our fleet Nothing is as yet in Motion, and we are impatiently waiting for orders— do you think, my dear Doctor, our British friends will let the Blow fall so heavily upon them, and don’t you Rather Believe they’ll try to set up a...
(I) ALS : American Philosophical Society; copies: Library of Congress, National Archives; transcript: National Archives; (II) ALS : American Philosophical Society Whatever Expectations Might have been Rais’d from the Sense of past favors, the Goodness of the United States for me has ever been such, that on every occasion it far surpasses any idea I could have conceiv’d— A new proof of that...
ALS : American Philosophical Society The happy intelligence which you had the kindness of forwarding to me, is the more pleasing to My heart, that I am Glad to have Given to our scoth friends, A little But full view of the American flag— Captain Jones has ever inspir’d me with a great Regard for his talents and patriotic Spirit, and I am Proud to find that Both these Qualities have been...
ALS : American Philosophical Society The fear of detaining your dispatches has induc’d me not to send my express of yesterday, so that the paquets which my last promises for sunday, will together with yesterday’s letter, Be delivered into your hand By to morrow’s evening. Inclos’d you will find 1st a letter to Congress whom for any Minuted intelligence I Refer to your dispatches, But whom I...
AL : American Philosophical Society The Matter I am going to write upon is of A delicate Nature, and Nothing But My Love for America, the sense I have of theyr interests, and the entire, unbounded Confidence, I trust on your friendship and secrecy could engage me to use with you on this subject all possible freedom. From private intelligences, I am to suppose that a Negotiation has been...
ALS : American Philosophical Society From the Sight of this hand writing, you will, I dare say, expect some dissertation on Military, Political, and in a word on Public Affairs— how far you are from guessing the object of My letter will clearly Appear in a little time. I am not a scavant , My Good friend, I am nothing But a Rough soldier, and would hardly do for a Committee-Man, tho you know...
ALS : American Philosophical Society With a trüe satisfaction I have seen that the Royal influence in the irish parliament, fell very short of Ministerial expectations, and that some patriots Begin to speack a Bold language, and mention the Blessed words of independency and the Rights of Mankind— In the eyes of people that would be strangers to parliamentary Barking, such Speeches would be...
ALS : American Philosophical Society We were thinking But of winter quarters for the troops, and preparing every thing for our Return to paris, when an extraordinary Courier Brought us the order of Being Ready to March at a Moment’s Warning— I Need not telling you how surpris’d I was of this Unexpected Resolution that I know to have been taken on a sudden By the Ministry, and I seize the...
ALS : American Philosophical Society This letter will be delivered to Your Excellency By Mr. Smith who in compagny with Mr. Watts came from Virginia on commercial Business in which they have for a partner a good friend of Mine Bre [Brigadier] General Scott— Those two Gentlemen I Beg leave to present and most particularly to Reccommend to Yr Excellency that they Might apply themselves to You on...