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Documents filtered by: Author="Lafayette, Marie-Joseph-Paul-Yves-Roch-Gilbert du Motier, marquis de" AND Period="Revolutionary War"
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ALS : American Philosophical Society According to an appointement I had Requested from Mr. De Montbarrey, I had last Morning a Conversation With that Minister, wherein I did Earnestly urge the Necessity of sending from the Royal Magazines to America, fifteen thousands Stands of Arms and a large Quantity of powder— I Can’t say My Endeavours, tho’ Exerted to the Best of My Power, have met with...
ALS : American Philosophical Society From a Ministerial letter I just Receive from Versaïlles I Begin to hope that My little Negotiation will take a Good turn, and as I Made it my point to succeed in this affair, No exertions will be untried for the purpose— I should, My Good friend, have done Myself the honor of Waïting on You this Morning, was I Not seiz’d By A Violent Cold, Which I the more...
ALS : American Philosophical Society According to the letter your Grand son wrote me last Morning I have obtain’d from the Ministry that the four thousand Compleat Cloathes would be Carried on Board of the frigatte that is ordered to Carry me to America— so that if they are at Rochefort, la Rochelle, l’isle d aix or l’isle de Rhé By the Second of the next month they will be taken on Board— I...
ALS : American Philosophical Society In Consequence of the Assent that Your excellency was pleas’d to honor My Request with, I’ll Beg your obliging help positively to fix My ideas on some Affairs Relating to our Army, in which I had the happiness of Acting as one of Your Agents at the Court of Versailles. From Both Ministers of the War and of foreign Affairs I Got the Most positive Assurance...
AL : American Philosophical Society I am for the last time Going to Versaïlles, My Good friend, and Any Command from You on this occasion will be very well Come— As I am in a great hurry for My departure, Be so kind as to let me know if You want me to Come to Your lodgings to Morrow at ten o’clock or if you choose Better to Call here. If it is equal to you, I’d thank you for your dispatches...
ALS : American Philosophical Society We are Again Going to Sail, But no News about our cloathing— What is Become of it, I Cannot Guess, and am extremely sorry that they are not Arriv’d— I hope the Whole will be soon Sent to America, and this intelligence will I dare Say Be very Agreable to the Army. In Wishing You A Good health, and the accomplishment of any thing You May desire, in Wishing...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I Wish it was in My power to Give you some Grand intelligence from this part of the world—But Considering the Naval Superiority which the Ennemy have hitherto kept on our Coasts, You will not wonder at our finding it Rather difficult to Cooperate against Maritime points, or such points as are at an immence distance from us. The Arrival of the french Succour...
Two LS : American Philosophical Society, Harvard University Library Whatever might have been my sense of the Enemies particular aversion for truth in every thing that relates to America, I am obliged to confess, that the fertility of their imagination has far surpassed all my expectations.— My experience when last in Europe, has given this a new force, and taught me, that frequent and...
LS : Harvard University Library, American Philosophical Society I did myself the honor of writing to you a letter from Camp, wherein your Excellency will find an account of some late transactions on this side of the water— I am now to inform you, that our Army are gone into winter Quarters, & by their position effectually cover the State of New Jersey, as well as our Works on the North-River—...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I Had Some Weeks Ago the Honor of Writing to You from Philadelphia, And Inform’d You that Congress were About dispatching A Particular Messenger, with A View to forward french Succour, and Laying our Situation Before the Court of Versaïlles— this I Attribute to the difficulties that Prevented the Naming of A Secretary to Your Embassy, a point on Which I am...
L : American Philosophical Society Le marquis de Lafayette Scachant que Monsieur de francklain est un peut Incommodé le marquis de Lafayette n’aura pas lhonneur de le voir ce Soir, Il prie Monsieur de francklain de lui mander si le poura voir demain a midy il Sy rendra sans manquer. Addressed: A Monsieur / Monsieur de francklain / Ministre des Provinces unies / De Lamerique / a Passy Notation:...
ALS : Dartmouth College Library I am very Sorry it was not in My power to wait on Your Excellency This Morning but I was oblig’d to Ride with The Queen at a partie of pleasure in the Bois de Boulogne— I saw yesterday the first and other Ministers and Spoke to them about The Necessity of Giving you Monney for fulfilling the Engagements taken in Bills of Exchange— That they Became pretty...
ALS : American Philosophical Society; transcript: Harvard University Library I Had the Night Before Last the pleasure to See Mr. franklin and Gave Him some Account of the Situation our Affair Was in at that time. I Can for the Present be More Particular, and will Relate What Has Past Respecting the letter of Mr. de Veymerange and the Several Articles a list of which Has Been put into My Hands....
AL : American Philosophical Society Mis. [Marquis] de Lafayette’s Most Respectfull Compliments Wait on Mr franklin and Has the Honor to Inform His Excellency that in Compliance with His directions He Had Last Evening a Conference with Count de Vergennes— The Minister Said He Wished to Make Himself the Communication to Mr. franklin, when Asked for it By Him, So that the Sum will Be immediately...
L : American Philosophical Society Le marquis de Lafayette prie Monsieur de francklin de lui faire dire si Sera chés lui a midy et demie Il seroit bien aise de le voir. Notation: De La Fayette Mr. le ms. 28. Fevr. 1782.
AL : American Philosophical Society The Mis. [Marquis] de la fayette Has the Honor to Present His Respectfull Compliments to Mr. franklin and informs Him that the frigat Hermione is Arrived in 23 days from America— Mr. franklin’s dispatches Will No Doubt Be sent By Count de Vergennes—The Marquis Had two letters that Say Very little on public Business, and Will to Morrow After noon do Himself...
L : University of Pennsylvania Library Le Mis De la fayette a l’honneur de presenter Son Respect à Monsieur franklin, et comme il ne doit Voir qu’a onze heures la personne interessée dans la petite affaire dont il la Chargé hier, il pense que le depart d’aujourd’huy pourroit être differé jusqu’a demain au point du jour. Dès qu’il y aura une Réponse Le Mis De la fayette aura lhonneur d’en faire...
ALS : Library of Congress Major Ross Having Called Upon me this Morning, and Having said that in the Mean while You Give His Lordship’s Conditional Disharge it was Your Opinion I should Give that of the Aids de Camp at the Bottom of which you will Express Your Approbation of the Measure, I Request You will please to Have the Piece drawn up in the Way that Appears to You the Most properly...
AL : American Philosophical Society Will You Please, My dear sir, to let me Have a Copy of the Paper I gave to Major Ross, that I May Enclose it to General Washington and get His approbation of the Measure? The Moment You get the Bill be pleased to Communicate it— I will do the same on my part, and am Very Anxious to see How that Piece is Manufactured. Notation: La Fayette The two Saturdays...
ALS : American Philosophical Society; transcripts: National Archives, Massachusetts Historical Society Agreable to Your Desire I Have Waited Upon Count de Vergennes and said to Him What I Had in Command from Your Excellency— He Intends taking the King’s orders this Morning, and Expects He Will Be Able to propose Mr. Grenville a Meeting for to Morrow where He Will Have Him to Explain Himself...
ALS : Library of Congress Having Nothing New to Communicate I will Remain this day at Versailles, and will Wait on Your Excellency in the Course of to morrow’s Morning— Mr. Grenville Has dined with Count de Vergennes, and is Going Again to write to London —if this Goes on, at Least it Goes at A Moderate Gate— I Hope Your Health is Better, and Have the Honor to Be with Great Respect Your...
ALS : Library of Congress You Have Been Acquainted that Mr. de Castries’s Courier was to Go to Morrow Evening, and I intend taking the same Opportunity to write to Congress and General Washington— But as I want to justify My delay, Upon the trüe Motives of it, those of Public Utility, and American Wellfare, I Hope Your Excellency will please to Mention fully the Matter to Congress, and By...
Reprinted from William Temple Franklin, ed., Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin … (3 vols., 4to, London 1817–18), II , 386. I have the honour to inform you, my dear Sir, that Mr. Grenville’s express is arrived this morning by way of Ostend. The gentleman is gone to Versailles. I fancy he will wait upon you, and will be much obliged to you, to let me know what your opinion...
AD and copy: Library of Congress Vergennes had advised the American commissioners against delaying negotiations over the issue of Oswald’s commission. As he wrote to La Luzerne, in politics one should yield on form when satisfied with the substance. Franklin agreed. When Jay continued to object, Vergennes and Lafayette proposed to him a solution that might expedite matters: having Oswald write...
ALS : Historical Society of Pennsylvania In the present letter Lafayette confirms that Vergennes secretly sent Gérard de Rayneval to England for a meeting with Shelburne. Jay had heard this news on September 9, the day he and Oswald were forging a compromise about the language of Oswald’s commission. Suspecting that the purpose of Rayneval’s mission was to arrange a peace with France at...
ALS : University of Pennsylvania Library Every Child of Mine that Comes to Light is a Small Addition to the Number of American Citizens— I Have the pleasure to inform You that, tho she Was But Seven Month Advanced, Mde de Lafayette Has this Morning Become Mother of a daughter Who However delicate in his Begining Enjoys a perfect Health, and I Hope Will Soon grow Equal to the Heartiest...
AL : American Philosophical Society I am Very sorry, My Dear sir, I Have not the Pleasure to Wait Upon You this Evening— But Mr. jay Called at Half Past Eight and told me He Had Considered of the Affair Now in Question, And Before Any thing Was Determined He Wants to Have A long Conversation With You— He Will be at Passy to Morrow Morning— for My Part I see You Will not of Course Give me Any...
ALS : Newberry Library; transcript: New York Public Library Since the Early Period When I Had the Happiness to Be Adopted Among the sons of America, I Ever Made it My Point to do that Which I thought Would prove Useful to Her Cause or Agreable to Her Citizens. After We Had Long Stood By ourselves, France did join in our Quarrell, and So Soon as Count d’Estaing’s departure Made My Presence...
AL : Library of Congress Mis. [Marquis] de Lafayette’s Best Respects Waït Upon Mr franklin and Would Be Much obliged to His Excellency for a Copy of His Memorial to the french Court As He Intends Pressing Upon this Subject in a Letter to Count de Vergennes. The Mis. de Lafayette Begs Also to know at What time Captain Barnay Has Set out for L’orient, and When His Courier is Expected Back— Count...
ALS : Library of Congress Having Waïted some time for Mr. jay, I Was told By doctor Bancroft that the two other Ministers Now Agreed With You in Opinion that After What I Had done in the Affair of Monney, it was Better for me Immediately to join the Convoy— However I Waïted once More Upon Count de Vergennes on My Passage at Versaïlles, and Had a long Conversation With Him— Let the dispatches...
ALS : Library of Congress To My Very Great Concern, I Have not Yet Received Your Answer to My letter, Nor the Account of What Has officially Past in Monney Matters— But Your Opinion Has Been I should Go, and I Am Pursuing an object that May I Hope prove Useful to America— Upon Your Opinion therefore, I Determine My Going— We are Under sails With 9 ships of the line, And about 6000 Men Recruits...
ALS : American Philosophical Society After Having Been two days out of the Road, a S. o. [SW] Wind Obliges us to Come Back Again, and I fear it Will Give time for Lord Howe to Embarass our Passage— No Letter from You Has Yet Come to Hand, Which I am Very sorry for, as I Impatiently Waït for Information Upon our Monney Affairs— I Have not Yet Received Your Answer to My Consulting Letter— But I...
ALS : Library of Congress However Certain it Appears that Peace is Near at Hand, I Have thought that Personal Considerations ought to Give Way to Motives of Public Utility— I am therefore sailing With the fleet, and Untill Peace is Ascertained, Will Continue in Promoting the Views Which You Have Decided to Be the Most Advantageous to America— in this Affair, it is Useless to observe that My...
L : American Philosophical Society Le Mis. De la fayette fait Ses compliments à Monsieur franklin et le prie de lui faire lhonneur de Venir diner chez luy jeudy prochain en Sa maison Rue de Bourbon. May 1. The other American peace commissioners went as well: Butterfield, John Adams Diary , III , 117. Having reached the age of majority (25 years), Lafayette was able to purchase a house on the...
Copies: Massachusetts Historical Society, Library of Congress Having Yesterday conferred with Count de Vergennes upon some Public Concerns, He requested I would tell you what, instead of troubling you with the Demand of a meeting, I think better to mention in this Note. The several Powers said he, are going to make up their Treaties, and when ready to sign, they will of Course meet to do it...
Printed invitation with MS insertions: American Philosophical Society The Marquis de la Fayette has the Honor to present his Compliments to Mr. Franklin and begs the Favor of His Company at Dinner on Monday next An Answer is desired June 9. BF was a frequent guest at the Monday dinners held at Lafayette’s magnificent new home: XXXIX , 520–1n; Louis Gottschalk, Lafayette between the American...
AL : Columbia University Library Mquis. de Lafayette’s Compliments waït upon Mr. Franklin and Mr. Jay, and Has the Honour to Acquaint them He Had letters from America down to the first of May— On Many points He is Referred to the letters those Gentlemen Must Have Received— The Mquis. de Lafayette Intends paying them His Respects to Morrow at Breakfast time, and will Communicate what...
ALS : Massachusetts Historical Society Having Been Honoured With letters from Congress, it Becomes my duty to Consult You Upon a point Which they Have particularly Recommended— In the late preliminaries no time is Mentionned for the American Merchants paying their English debts— A Matter of Great Moment to our Merchants who Require at least three or four Years to Accomplish the Business— Upon...
ALS : Sotheby’s, New York (1985) I Beg leave to Return You My thanks for the Notice You Give me of An opportunity to America— But find it is too late to improve it, and My only Hope is that some letters I Have these past days sent to Paris, Have Been put on Board the Washington— Since we Could not Get Monney Here, I am Glad it Has Been found in Holland— Mr. Hartlay’s dissatisfaction, if...
I do not do myself the honor of wr⟨a⟩ïting to you as many times as I would ch⟨u⟩se, because I fear to disturb⟨e⟩ your important occupations—but I indulge Now that pleasure to me on the occasion of the two nominations of Congress—general connay is a so brave, intelligent, and active officer that he schall, I am sure, justify more and more the esteem of the army and Your approbation—for the...
I went down to this place since the day before yesterday in order to be acquainted of all the roads and grounds arround the ennemy—I heard at my arrival that theyr Main body was betwen great and little timber creek since the same evening—Yesterday morning in recconnoitring about I have been told that they were very busy in crossing the delaware—I saw them myself in theyr boats and sent that...
Your excellency ordered me to give my opinion about these three places for winter quarters 1º the chain from about the Sculchill till betheleem—2º this from reading to lancaster—3º building hutts about and quartering in willmington. I must Confess My being prevented of fixing my Sentiments in a decicise manner by my want of knowledge about very interesting points amongs them as 1º  how far we...
the project of calling a large body of militia for such a day, in order to attack the ennemy in philadelphia, seems to me attended with so many difficulties, inconveniences and bad chances, that if it is not looked upon as a necessary and almost desesperate enterprize, tho’ it is a very shining and highly pleasing idea, however I cannot think it is a prudent and reasonable one. the reasons for...
I went Yesterday morning to Head Quarters with an intention of Speaking to Your Excellency But You were too Busy and I shall lay down in this letter what I wished to Say. I don’t Need telling You How I am Sorry for all what Happens Since Some time it is a necessary dependence of my most tender and Respectful friendship for You, which affection is as true and Candid as the other Sentiments of...
I schould have much more reproached myself the liberty I took of wraïting to your excellency, if I had believed it could engage you in the trouble of answering to that letter—but, now, as you have wrote it, I must tell you that I received this favor with the greatest satisfaction and pleasure—every assurance and proof of your affection fills my heart with joy because that sentiment of yours is...
As your excellency’s opinion seems to gree with my ideas for ⟨taking⟩ in our service those Non commissioned officers who came with Mister du Coudray, I schall take the liberty of telling you what I know about the matter—how useful they would be in this army is a thing obvious for every body—those ⟨men⟩ join to a pretty great theory the greatest practice of theyr art—security and exactitude...
I Schall make use in this particular instance of the liberty you gave me of telling freely every idea of mine which could strike me as not being useless to a better order of things. There were two gentlemen, same rank, same duty to perform, and same neglect of it who have been arrested the same day by me—as I went in the night around the piquets I found them in fault, and I gave an account of...
I have recieved just now a letter from general connway who is gone on to york town, and mullens his aid de camp who is not a wit, lets me know that his going there is in consequence of two repeated letters from general gates, and miflin—that same man thinks that there are some projects to send Connway to Canada—they will laugh in france when they’l hear that he is choosen upon such a...
I can not let go back my guide without taking this opportunity of wraiting to your excellency tho’ I have not yet public business to speak of—I go on very slowly some times pierced by rain, sometimes covered with snow, and not thinking many handsome thoughts about the projected incursion into canada —if succèss were to be had it would surprise me in a more agreable manner, by that very reason...
Why am I so far from you, and what business had that board of war to hurry me through the ice and Snow without knowing what I schould do, neither what they were doing themselves? you have thought perhaps that theyr project could be attended with some difficulty, that some means had been neglected, that I could not obtain all the succès and the immensity of laurels which they had promised to...