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I have the honor to enclose a Copy of an account received a day or two ago from M r Warwick, and hope the Instruments may reach you in good order. ViU .
According to my letter of the 20 th Ultimo, I have now the honor to send you enclosed the promised Despatch of M r Secretary Canning. I gave M r Barlow notice thereof, and measures are prepared to have the matter brought to a Conclusion—A M r Warwick of Virginia is to ship the goods to your order in Virginia, taking care to have them previously insured—The first shipment will probably take...
After a good deal of Correspondence with the office for foreign affairs on the subject of M r Bonnycastle’s removal to Virginia; it has resulted in this conclusion, that Virginia will in no circumstance be called upon for the Forfeiture of M r Bonnycastle’s Bond; and this has been so understood, after it was distinctly observed, that should he or his Bondsmen be called upon, that Virginia...
(Duplicate) I duly received on the 2 d Instant your packet of the 28 th July, covering a letter from you to M r Callaway, and also one from you to me, containing a duplicate of a former Bill for £1350, of whose receipt and disposition I have already advised you: and also a Bill of Exchange for £675. Sterling by Kerr & Caskie on James Dunlop of London in favor of Thomas Tredway. I immediately...
I received at Cheltenham on the 17 th Ins t your Packet, containing among other letters and Papers, a letter from you to me covering a draft for £1350 Stg; accompanied with a request that I would consent to become the Depository of this sum for the purpose proposed. I accept with pleasure this trust, and have accordingly sent the Draft to Mess rs Baring Brothers and C o Bankers of the United...
As none of the Eminent Statesmen of the Country was more Early, or deeply impressed by the great importance of our national Fisheries, and navigation; and as no one has made more constant Exertions, than you have done, to Establish these Rights; I have taken the Liberty to send you a copy of a Speech that I delivered in the Senate during the last session of Congress, upon an occasion, in...
Another of the Patriots of the Revolution is gone: The Vice President was dressed as usual to attend Senate this morning, went in his carriage to call upon Mr. Nourse of the Treasury Department, complained while there of feeling unwell, was helped by Mr. Nourse into the carriage to return to his Quarters, distant not more than a quarter of a mile, was senseless when he arrived there, and on...
Mr. William R. Foster, son of a reputable Gentleman who is my near neighbour, and for whom, and for whose Family I take a particular Interest, is desirous to serve in the Navy. I have reason to think favorably of Mr. W. R. Foster’s Reputation; and can have no doubt, should he enter into the navy, that he will serve with credit to himself, and advantage of the Public. I have abstained from...
I had the honour to write to you on the 15. of last month, since when I have received by General Miranda who has arrived here, a letter from Mr. N. Vansittart⟨,⟩; a member of the British parliament, and who was likewise a member of the late Administration of Mr. Addington. Mr. Vansittart being a man of distinguished Probity, and in a situation to understand fully the subject on which he...
You will probably recollect that soon after my return from England I communicated to you the Extract of a Letter that I had received and which related to an object respecting which we cannot be in different. For some time past I have heard nothing further on the Subject: A few days since however I received a Letter from the same Person, dated London Aug. 8. the following Extract of which I...
Owing to my absence from NYK. I had not the honour of receiving yr letter of the 13. before yesterday. Although the suspended Items in my a/c are in my judgment equitable charges, yet as they seem not to be included within the List of contingent expenses heretofore allowed, I feel myself duly sensible of the Presidents liberality in the direction which he has authorised to be sent to the...
In answer to your Letter of the 24 inst. I have the honour to state that no engagement was ever made by me that the long Bills of the Proctors shd. be paid. In consequence of an instruction that I gave to the agt. Mr Bayard to require that the proctors Bills shd. be regularly taxed, several of them came to me, to represent what they called the usage on this subject, and to urge me to...
As my mission abroad had no other connexion with the money department of our Govt. than wht. arose from the payment and receipt of my annual appointments, I made it a point carefully not to have the custody, or to become accountable for any money belonging to the public. Hence I have concluded that I have no accounts to settle with the treasury. But as however this department keeps the accts....
Since my letter of the 24th. I have recd. yrs. of the same date; and after maturely reflecting upon the subject, and consulting one or two of our friends here I am confirmed in the Sentiment that I ought not to consent to be a candidate for the Govr. shd. the federalists think of offering me. This being my determination, it is right that I shd apprize you of it, in order that our friends may...
Mr. D. Ogdon called upon me a few minutes past, and as I understood from him that he purposes writing to you by the mail of this Evening, I think it proper, in order to avoid any misconception of the tenour of our conversation to repeat to you the purport of what I said to him. viz. “Whether it will be expedient to offer a federal candidate for the Govr. is a point upon wh, from the want of...
I lose no time in replying to the queries contained in your letter of the 18. thoh I fear I may not be in time for the mail of today. Q. 1. All foreign ministers pay the first visit to the ministers of England: immediately after being presented to the King the new foreign minister goes round in his carriage, and leaves a card with his name and Quality at the house of each of the Cabinet...
While abroad I took some pains to collect the Publications that have been made respecting the discovery and settlement of America; among the Reports and Letters of the Early Settlers, I have a manuscript account of Bacon’s Rebellion in 1675, written by a member of your assembly for the County of Northumberland, and addressed to Sr. Robert Harley . As this account is more particular than any...
Herewith I enclose the Letter of the Comee. of the Senate, together with my answer to yr’s of the 4. Should it still be thought inexpedient to ratify the Convn. without farther Explanation I should think there would be no objection on the part of G. Br before the delivery of the Ratifications, to exchange with Mr Monroe a dec[larati]on that the Conn. was concluded without Reference to the...
My correspondence with the Department of State while I was in England, at different periods, had reference to the independence of So. America and whatever seemed to me material in my conversations on this subject either with the Br. Ministers, or with Genl. Miranda and other natives of the Spanish Colonies, was from time to time mentioned in my Despatches. I have lately received two Letters...
As well on account of the State of Affairs between England and France, as at the pressing desire of our minister at Paris, I prolonged my Residence in London from the 20th. of Ap. to the 19th. of may. By the charter party made in my behalf with the owner of the Ship engaged to bring me home, I was bound to pay £560. Sterling for my passage, to have my Effects on board, and be ready to embark...
I take the Liberty to add a few miscellaneous articles by way of supplement to my last dispatch. American Seamen As soon as the war appeared to me unavoidable I thought it advisable to renew the attempt to form an arrangement with the British Government for the protection of our seamen: with this view I had several conferences both with Lord Hawkesbury and Mr. Addington who avowed a sincere...
I have just recd. and am obliged to you for your letter of the 5th. the settlement of my family will for some time call for and engage my time and attention, after this shall have been done, I will cheerfully upon an intimation from you, visit the seat of Govt. and make any such personal Communications as you may require. Had I supposed that you had not recd. dispatches from Paris of a date...
The Receipt of my dispatches will have apprized you of my arrival. For the moment I am engaged in the arrangements which the Settlement of my family require—as soon as I find a leisure moment I will prepare and send you the promised Supplement to my last dispatch, tho I really have nothing of importance to add. I do not recollect whether it has been the usage for our Ministers to proceed to...
On the 16th of last month the King of Great Britain sent a message to Parliament announcing the termination of the discussions with France, and calling on them to support him in his determination to employ the power & resources of the nation in opposing the spirit of ambition and encroachments of the Government of France. Letters of marque had been issued against France, and I conjecture that...
I left London the 18th. and sailed from Cowes the 21st. of last month—on the 16. the King sent a message to Parliament announcing the termination of the discussions with france, the Recall of the English ambassador from Paris, and that the french ambassador had left London; and calling upon Parliament to support “him in his determination to employ the Power and Resources of the Nation in...
Anticipating the rupture which may be regarded as having in effect taken place, I have sought and without difficulty found opportunities of conversing with those Members of the Cabinet who have the most influence in its decisions in order to impress upon them the very great importance, in the event of War, that the Instructions given to their Naval officers should be drawn up with plainness...
A Government Messenger arrived at Twelve o’Clock to-day in forty hours from Paris, with a dispatch from Lord Whitworth, saying that he had received his Passports, and should leave Paris immediately after the Messenger on Thursday Evening. General Andreossy will therefore leave London to night, and the two Ambassadors will probably pass each other on Monday between Dover and Calais. Thus the...
13 May 1803, London. No. 98. “I have the honour to transmit herewith the Convention which I yesterday signed in Triplicate with Lord Hawkesbury relative to our Boundaries. The Convention does not vary in any thing material from the tenour of my Instructions. The line thro’ the Bay of Passamaquoddy secures our Interest in that quarter. The provision for running, instead of describing, the Line...
I have not been able to obtain the consent of the Sierra Leone Company to receive the Slaves which the State of Virginia might be willing to send to that settlement. My Correspondence on this Subject has been closed by a Letter from the Chairman Mr. Thornton which states that the Company are in Treaty with Government to receive the Colony under its exclusive control. The fact I understand to...
10 May 1803, London. No. 97. “Upon farther search several Trunks of Papers respecting West Florida have been discovered, and upon my application orders were immediately given to deliver them to me. I have annexed Copies of the application, and Answer, in order that the manner may appear in which these Documents came into our possession. “I am told by the Clerk who found them that there are...
Lord Whitworth was ordered to leave Paris on the Evening of the 3d. instant, unless the French Government should have signed a Minute by which it should be agreed that the English should continue the Military possession of Malta for ten years; that the Island of Lampidusa should be ceded to them for ever; and that the French Forces should be withdrawn from Holland. On the morning of the 3rd....
1 May 1803, London. No. 95. Reports that according to the certificate of the accountant general of the Court of Chancery, the fund claimed by the state of Maryland consists of bank stock, 5 percent stock, and cash amounting to £187,567 12 d . sterling. Suits in chancery were instituted “many years back” against Russell and other fund trustees by Chase as agent for Maryland, by Barclay and...
The question of Peace or War is still undecided; and as France plays for Time, and England (in which there is a public opinion) for a good Case to lay before the Nation, the negotiation may be spun out still longer; tho’ it continues to be said, as has been said for the last fortnight, that the next Messenger would enable the Ministry to bring it to a close. The objection of the British...
In a Conference with Lord Hawkesbury on the 6th. instant, I explained to him the object of the extraordinary mission of Mr Monroe pursuant to the tenour of your Letter of the 29. of January; and I have the pleasure to inform you that his Lordship received the Communication in good part, suggested no doubt of our right to pursue separately and alone the objects we aim at, and appeared to be...
23 April 1803, London. No. 92. Refers to his dispatch no. 87 [25 Mar. 1803] , which mentioned the difficulty that had arisen regarding the proceedings of the commissioners under article 7 of the Jay treaty. “Several Conferences have since taken place between me and Lord Hawkesbury, but the Impediment is not yet removed. At my first meeting with Lord Hawkesbury, after the communication he had...
Since the removal of the Negotiation to Paris, I am less able to send you early and exact information of its progress. It is understood that according to the Instructions sent to Lord Whitworth on the 3rd. instant, his Lordship concluded his Conferences, as well with Mr. Talleyrand as with the First Consul, by declaring that a refusal of the satisfaction he was ordered to demand would be...
9 April 1803, London. No. 90. “The question of peace or War may at this moment be decided. Lord Hawkesburys Note in reply to the refusal of France to admit of any discussion respecting Malta is dated the 3rd. and was dispatched on the 4th. instant.” The note expresses the king’s regret that the French government had declined giving the satisfaction and explanation he demanded and had...
2 April 1803, London. No. 89. Reports that no answer has yet been given to Andréossy’s note, which declined all discussion of Malta. “Lord Hawkesbury’s Answer will probably be delivered to day; it will without doubt persist in the Determination communicated in his first Note, and may disclose new and additional reasons in its support.” The issue of an overture Napoleon reportedly made to...
28 March 1803, London. No. 88. “My No. 86. [19 Mar. 1803] communicated the tenour of Lord Hawkesbury’s Note of the 15. to the French Ambassador: the conclusion of the Note refers to the demand of France for the evacuation of Malta and declares ‘that the King cannot consent to its evacuation unless substantial security be provided for those objects which in present circumstances would be...
25 March 1803, London. No. 87. “Baron Silverhjelm, the Swedish Envoy, after mentioning once or twice that he had received orders to explain to me for the information of the President, the motives which had influenced Sweden to make peace with Tripoli, some days since called upon me, and for this purpose read me the Instructions which he had received from his Government. I suggested to him that...
19 March 1803, London. No. 86. “Orders were some Time past given to evacuate Egypt, and the English forces have at this Time probably left that Country. The independence of Malta, by the Treaty of Amiens, is placed under the Protection and guarantee of Great Britain, France, Spain, Austria, Russia and Prussia. Austria has acceded, Russia consents to accede, provided the Maltese langue be...
War seems more and more probable, indeed it appears to me inevitable: Holland will be involved, and Spain and Portugal must obey the commands of France. The day after the Kings Message to Parliament was communicated to the French Government, Bonaparte delivered to Lord Whitworth a paper (a copy of which I have seen) stating: 1. That the Expedition preparing in the Dutch Ports, was, as all the...
16 March 1803, London. No. 84. “Couriers last evening arrived at the french Ambassadors from Paris, and at the same Time a Messenger from Lord Whitworth: they left Paris after the communication of the Kings Message to Parliament of the 8th. instant had been received there. General Andreossi and the Dutch Ambassador both told me to day that for the purpose of taking away the pretext for War (as...
I lose no Time in sending you the important Message from the King that was last Evening delivered to the two houses of Parliament. Peace has not had the happy Effect of restoring harmony and confidence between England and France, and the Exposition of the Affairs of the latter which the first Consul lately delivered to the Legislature has not failed to produce its natural Effect upon this...
28 February 1803, London. No. 82. Acknowledges JM’s letters of 16 and 23 Dec. 1802 . “By Lord Hawkesbury’s desire, I have conferred with Colo. Barclay respecting the continuation of the Boundary through the Bay of Passamaquoddy who has made no objection to the line we have proposed, tho’ he appears to think that it would be improper to cede to us the Island of Campo Bello unless the cession...
9 February 1803, London. No. 81. “As I apprehended might be the case, Bird Savage & Bird have answered my demand for the surrender of the Bills of Exchange lately remitted to them, by saying they were unable to deliver them up, as they had been discounted before their failure.” Has requested the firm to prepare and send him “their Accounts including all receipts and Payments up to the day on...
7 February 1803, London. No. 80. “Last Evening (Sunday) I received a Note from Mr. Bird informing me that his House would be obliged to stop payment this morning, and that the United States are Creditors for a considerable Sum. The former Consul, Mr. Williams, having casually informed me that he had lately accepted Bills for several thousand pounds payable to Bird Savage and Bird for the...
28 January 1803, London. No. 79. Reports that no further progress has been made in the boundary discussion. “From one or two Conversations that I have had with Colo. Barclay, who has returned to Town, I perceive that his opinion, whatever influence it may have, will be favourable to such a Settlement of the Eastern Boundary, as would be satisfactory to us. The chief difficulty … respects the...
31 December 1802, London. Acknowledges JM’s letter and expresses thanks for the early reply as well as for the “like communication” sent to King’s agent in New York. “As I expect the vessel coming to me from America, will be here, and ready for me & my family to embark by the 10. of April, I am making the requisite preparations and hope I may not be disappointed in receiving my Letters of...
29 December 1802, London. No. 78. “In the Bill that after the holidays will be brought into parliament for the consolidation of the Customs the Duties upon Articles imported from the United States will stand nearly as they do at present, except that it has been purposed to raise the Duty upon Spermaceti Oil coming from any foreign Country, from £22.3.1 to £31.10. I have had one or two...