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The confusion which hath for some time happened amongst the People in the disputed Lands between Pennsylvania and this Colony, and a Representation to the Convention, that a Civil War, was like to be the consequence if something was not done to prevent it, Induced that Body to take the Subject into consideration, who were sorry to discover that a Jealousy seemed to prevail in the Governing...
Capt. Monroe leaveing Town this evening I cannot avoid informing you by him that as far as his conduct has fallen under my observation and I have not been unattentive to it, he has been diligent in endeavouring to raise men but such is the present disposition of the people in Virginia neither Capt. Monroe or any other Officer preserving the Character a Gent. ought to support can recruit men...
Being in want of a light Pheeton I directed my Servt to inquire abt the City for one—He tells me he has found a single light carriage wch belongs to you and has been lying here for some time—I have not seen it but from his account of it expect it will answer my purpose and if you choose to sell will purchase and give any price you may think it reasonably worth—If it is your inclination to keep...
I have your Phaeton here though I was obliged to send for it after I left Philadelphia being put to the rout the night I recd your Letter. The bolt that fastens the pole & part of the long reins were lost, some brass nails also gone, and the lining much dirted and in some places torn, I will get these little matters repaired and have the carriage and Harness kept clean and in as good order as...
On my return to Congress I found the speakers Letter informing me my resignation was accepted by the House of Delegates and that I might as soon as I pleased return home which I did after staying abt a week to put the Business we had been sent upon to Camp in a proper train—the Issue of which I had then every reason to expect wod be according to the wishes of the Army but what the event has...
Col. Grayson has mentioned to me his receiving a Letter from Genl Weedon Desiring to serve in the northern Army if any employmt can be carved out for him—This Gentleman for whom, as an Officer, I entertain a regard, has attributed the regulation of his Rank, wch has occasioned his retireing, in great part to me; tho’ God knows I did no more in the matter then was my Duty by moving in Congress...
I have your favour of the 31st ult. in answer to my several Letters and was then impressed with and still feel great anxiety on account of our public affairs. The present distress is to be ascribed in great part to the resolution not to issue any more Bills of Credit before a sufficiency of money was provided and supplies secured for the Army—had proper precaution been taken in these matters,...
The Troops left by Sr. Henry Clinton in South Carolina amounting to about 3500 Men besides 1500 sent to Georgia cannot be sufficient unless increased by the accession of Tories, to overawe that State, especially when the Inhabitants shall find themselves supported by the Regulars and Militia going to their assistance. The 5000 Militia recommended by Congress to be raised by Virga. to join the...
A Report from the Board of War in consequence of a Letter of Genl Gates’s to Congress refd to the Board respecting the Promotion of Col. Danl Morgan to the Office of Brigadier General, now lies upon the Table, at my request. The Board have stated his former Services—his being first Colonel of our Line, and the deficiency of that State at present in her Quota of Troops. If a promotion of...
Your Letter to Colo. Harrison turns out as I expected before I received your full information. If the whole had been read and attended to it was impossible to put any other construction on your manner of treating the Subject than to convince your correspondent of the absolute necessity of great exertions this Campaign; while we had a promising prospect before us, least by remissness and delay...