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Since my last of the 9 th I have recieved representations from the faculty of our Professors, on the subject of the annual importations of the Periodicals desired by the Visitors. they say that to answer their views it is indispensable that they should come at shorter intervals, quarterly, for example, at least. I must therefore correct the request in that letter, and pray you to direct your...
you perhaps noted in the newspapers some 3. or 4. months ago the mention of cucumbers in a particular garden in Ohio which measured 2½f. V 3.f. in length. having a friend in that quarter I wrote and requested him to procure & send me some seed from one of the identical cucumbers. he has sent it, and to multiply chances of securing it, I send you 9. seeds, assured that no body will be more...
The mr Ware after whom your letter of the 3 d enquires came on here as an undertaker of two of our buildings. he compleated them, was paid, and did some work in other parts of the State, after which he went to N.Y. where I believe he is now resident. this is all the informn I can give you with which be pleased to accept my respects MHi .
you mentioned in your last favor that until the term of payment of our bond to the Collectors should be approaching. it would be better to let that subject lie, to come on in it’s proper turn. the bond becomes due in the course of the ensuing month of May, the particular day I do not recollect, but it is after the middle of the month. and I believe I may say for one & all of us that it would...
Mr Wirt declined the offices proposed to him. Mr. Lomax has accepted the Professorship of Law, and will open his school on the 1st day of July. He has paid us a visit, and his appointment appears to have given the highest degree of satisfaction to every body, Professors Students, Neighbors, and to none more than to myself. We have now 166 students, and on the opening of the Law school, we...
I omitted, in conversn with you yesterday to observe on the arrangement of the Elliptical Lecturing room that one third of the whole Area may be saved by the use of lap boards for writing on instead of tables, the room will hold half as many again, and, the expence & lumber of tables be spared. a bit of thin board 12. I. square covered or not with cloth to every person is really a more...
M r Wirt declined the offices proposed to him. M r Lomax has accepted the Professorship of Law, and will open his school on the 1 st day of July. he has paid us a visit, and his appointment appears to have given the highest degree of satisfaction to every body, Professors Students, Neighbors, and to none more than to myself. we have now 166. students, and on the opening of the Law school, we...
I recieved yesterday your favor of the 8 th inst. and this day desire Col o Bernard Peyton, my correspond t of Richm d to remit to you for mess rs Dodge & Oxnard for my account the sum of 124.61 stated in your lre which I hope will get safely and speedily to hand. I salute you with great esteem & respect. MHi .
I am called on for the amount of my last supply of wines E t c. from Mess rs Dodge and Oxnard of Marseilles, amounting to 124. D 61. c which I must pray you to remit for me to Mr E. Copeland j r their agent in Boston to be placed to my credit with them. ever and affection ly yours MHi .
The use you have made of my letters needed no apology. they were in fact public in their nature. had not my memory so totally left me, I have no doubt I might supply from that source whatever may be defective in the extracts you have made, for altho’ I cannot say I recollect the actual fact, yet from my knolege of myself I am conscious that a compliance with your request to return home was so...
I correct my blunder of misdirecting my letter to mr Madison by inclosing it to him this day. I committed a similar one while in Paris by cross directing two letters to two ladies out of which scrape I did not get so easily. affectionate salutations MiU-C .
Burwell pa. D 124 1816. Apr. 25. 10 128 Nov. 1. 10 131 1817. Apr. 26. 10 139 1818. Apr.
It is with great pleasure that I inform you that by an unanimous vote of the Rector & Visitors of the Univ y of Virga they have appointed you Professor of the school of law. in that instn an uncertain suggestion that mr Wirt A.G. of the US. would perhaps accept the office induced them to make him the offer, but counting little on his ance, relinquishment of the high station he now fills they...
I suspect I was mistaken in my letter of the 8 th in supposing the Report mentioned in your favor had not been recieved. I find one, said to be of mr Crownenshield on the Panama mission Mar. 25. 1826. in 13. pages which I suppose is the one alluded to. if so, be pleased to pardon the error and to accept my renewed assurances of esteem & consideration. MHi : Edward Everett Papers.
my last to you was of Nov. 4. yours since rec d are of Oct. 7. Nov. 14. Dec 10. Jan. 26. Feb. 11. the invoices rec d are from Article 243. to 1273. contained in boxes N o 7. to 21. which of these boxes particularly are come to hand I cannot say, having been prevented by my health from going to the University more than 2. or 3. times in as many months. the great default in my correspondence...
The seeds of the Serpentine cucumber which you have been so kind as to send me at the request of my friend mr Worthington are safely come to hand. h ow much of their extraordinary size may be ascribed to the exuberant soil and the climate of Ohio cannot be foreseen, but that a good portion of it may be retained we are permitted to hope. with my thanks for this friendly & acceptable present be...
I thank you for the very able and eloquent speech you have been so kind as to send me on the Amendment of the Constitution proposed by mr M c Duffie. I have read it with pleasure and edification, & concur with much of it’s contents. on the question of the lawfulness of slavery, that is, of the right of one man to appropriate to himself the faculties of another without his consent, I certainly...
Age & ill health have obliged me to commit all my affairs to the care of my grandson Th: J. R. and most especially the managemt of the Lottery with which I have been indulged. he is at this time gone on to the North, probably will reach N.Y. tomorrow where he will make and publish his final arrangemts. these therefore you will learn sooner than myself. he had some expectns of proceeding as far...
I learn with great pleasure that you are about publishing an account of your captivity by the Indians; it will be read with interest by every one, and I doubt not will sell well, I with pleasure add my name to the list of subscribers & with wishes for it’s success pray you to be assured of my continued frdship & respect MHi .
I rec d your letter of Feb. 8. and with it the specimens of engraving referred to only 3. days ago. Where they have loitered so long I know not. our Univ ty has not yet been long enough in opern to have subjects advanced to maturity for taking degrees. your specimens have a degree of merit well worthy of considn when the subject is taken up, and shall certainly then be duly attended to. but...
Age and ill health have for some time past rendered me unequal to the care of my affairs, they have therefore been committed to the management of my grandson Th: J. R . the lottery particularly with which I have been indulged has been entirely placed under his direction, insomuch that it is not in my power to answer the enquiries of your letter of Mar. 29. but he is at this time gone on...
I am happy to be informed of the historical work on our country which you are about to undertake, because I know that whatever you undertake will be well done. in your search after materials, you will of course look into those possessed by Congress. the collection of American history they recieved with my library was generally rich. that particularly so of pamphlets from the commencement of...
I have extracted from the late proceedings of the board of Visitors such articles as require to be immediately known and acted on. I must pray you in the first place to have a fair copy made out and delivered to Doct r Dunglison chairman of the faculty for communication by them to their classes, and that, to all others whom it may concern, you make known yourself such articles as concern them....
Your several communications intended for the board of Visitors of the University, together with your Journal, were duly laid before them at their late meeting on the 4 th instant, and respectfully considered. The subject of Diplomas and premiums for literary merit, which presented itself at the composition of the original code of regulations was but little attended to at that moment. it was...
I have the pleasure to inform you that by the unanimous vote of the Rector and Visitors of the University of Virginia, you have been appointed Professor of the school of law in that institution. to no one I can assure you is that appointment more gratifying than to myself. and I may further say with truth, and for your satisfaction that your name was among the first which occurred to some of...
From the preceding enactment for the establishment of a President of the University the Subscriber dissents for these reasons 1. because the law constituting the University delineating the organisation of the authorities by which it should be directed and governed and placing at it’s head a board of Rector & Visitors has enumerated with great precision the special powers it meant to give to...
75. Students of last year 85. New comers. 160. pay University rent @ 15.D. 2400 15 Outboarders 145 pay Dormitory rent @ 8.D 1160 3560 Annuity for 1826. 15,000 Salaries of 7. Professors 10,500 Rent of 6. Hotels 1,200 Law Professor 8. months
At a meeting of the Visitors of the University of Virginia held at the said University on Monday the 3 d and Tuesday the 4 th of April 1826. at which were present Thomas Jefferson, Joseph C. Cabell, John H. Cocke, Chapman Johnson and James Madison the following proceedings were had. 86. There shall be established in the University a Dispensary which shall be attached to the Medical school, and...
I wrote to mess rs Dodge and Oxnard the last summer as usual for my supply of wines and other articles. they accordingly forwarded to me the chief part, and informed me that the residue not being in hand for that conveyance they would be able to ship it by the next conveyance. the first parcel has been recieved some time but expecting daily to hear of the rest, I have delayed the remittance to...
Not knowing who is the Chairman of the Faculty for the present year, I must return the inclosed catalogue to yourself from whom I recieved it, as it needs explanations to enable the board of Visitors to act on it. for example. Not one of us knowing the German Alphabet, we must ask those titles to be written in English characters to enable us to read & act on them. where titles are written in...
The proceedings on my lottery are too far advanced to admit the practicability of any change whatever to be made on it. I have put the whole business in to the hands of my grandson who is now on his way to Baltimore and the Northern cities, and has already disposed of tickets probably in Richmond and on the road. I have meddled so little with it that I have not even asked from him any...
I do not recollect ever to have known any person of the name of Swope mentioned in your letter of Feb. 18. if I have, I have compleatly forgotten him, that would not be wonderful at the age of 83 and of a circumstance of 50. years ago. with regret that I cannot answer your enquiries I tender you my best wishes and respects. MHi .
I am indebted to you for the communication of your law for the establishment of primary schools. I rejoice at the measure being sincerely desirous of seeing the promotion of education, and especially in the South, where we have been too inattentive to it. I think you have begun at the right end, the primary schools. we began with them also, but on a bad plan I think. my hope however is that...
1826. March. Sally’s M. 1816. Louisa. x Martin Beck’s x Miles x Lindsay. x Jennet 1817. Moses’s Cretia’s 1818. Jackson. x Lucy.
I am thankful for the very interesting message and documents of which you have been so kind as to send me a copy, and will state my recollections as to the particular passage of the message to which you ask my attention. on the conclusion of peace, Congress, sensible of their right to assume independance, would not condescend to ask it’s acknolegement from other nations, yet were willing, by...
I thank you, Sir, for the treatise of mr M c Culloch, and your much approved republication of it. long withdrawn from the business of the world, and little attentive to it’s proceedings, I rarely read any thing requiring a very strenuous application of the mind, and none requires it more than the subject of political Economy. I rejoice nevertheless to see that it is beginning to be cultivated...
The most calamitous event which could happen to my family would be my death intestate; and prudence even requires that I should guard against the possibility of accident to my will by fire or otherwise were a single copy to be trusted to any where. I ask therefore the friendly office of you to recieve a duplicate in deposit for safe keeping and assure you of my affectionate friendship and...
Some boxes of philosophical apparatus are arrived at Richmond for the University in the care of Mess rs Warwicks. a paper is sent me to be signed entirely unconformable to the facts of the case, the awkwardness of which perhaps you can relieve by verbal explanations. I therefore trouble you with the papers open, to be perused, delivered and accomodated. The boxes must come indispensably by...
The inclosed letter from mr King not being in my possession when I rec d your favor of the 20 th I have been obliged to delay my answer till I could recover it. the facts in this case being to totally inapplicable to those supposed in the paper you inclosed for my signature, it is necessary for me to state them. the University of Virginia having occasion for a Philosophical apparatus, I as...
My grandson Th: Jefferson Randolph, being on a visit to Boston, would think he had seen nothing were he to leave it without having seen you. altho’ I truly sympathise with you in the trouble these interruptions give, yet I must ask for him permission to pay to you his personal respects. like other young people, he wishes to be able, in the winter nights of old age, to recount to those around...
My grandson Th: Jefferson Randolph, being on a visit to Boston, would think he had seen nothing were he to leave it without having seen you. altho’ I truly sympathise with you in the trouble these interruptions give, yet I must ask for him permission to pay to you his personal respects. like other young people, he wishes to be able, in the winter nights of old age, to recount to those around...
My Grandson Th:J.R. the bearer of this letter, on a journey to the North will probably make some short stay in his passage thro’ N. York. this in any case would have furnished me an occasion of expressing to you my great esteem. but a particular circumstance now makes his calling on you an imperious duty. I have learned and it is not long since, that mr Randolph my s. in law to whom I formerly...
My grandson, Th: Jefferson Randolph, the bearer of this letter, on a journey to the North, will perhaps pass some few days in New York, in doing this he wishes the honor of presenting his respects to you. he truly and personally merits the permission, and, like other young people, will hereafter pride himself in being able to name, among those he has known, the characters who have deserved...
My grandson Th: J.R. the bearer of this letter, on a Journey to the North will probably pass some few days in N. York. your former kindnesses have made it almost a duty in my connections to present their respects to you when passing thro’ your city . he is, in himself indeed personally and truly worthy of that honor, but the motive of permission on your part can only be that the tree we have...
My grandson Th: Jefferson Randolph, the bearer of this letter on a journey to the North, will pass 2. or 3. days perhaps in Washington. I cannot permit him to do this without presenting him to a friend of so long standing, whom I consider as the strictest of our models of genuine republicanism. let him be able to say when you are gone but not forgotten that he had seen Nathan l Macon on whose...
My grandson Th: J. Randolph the bearer of this letter is too well known to you to need a letter of introduction. he is going Northwdly on the business which was the subject of your kind letter of the 4 th . my unskilful stewardship of Agricultural property, and the interception of attention to it by imperious and higher duties have, in a course of 60 years much involved my capital. in our...
My grandson, Th: Jefferson Randolph, the bearer of this letter, on a journey to the North, will pass perhaps a few days in Philadelphia. I cannot permit him to do this without presenting him to you, a friend of another century, and to whom my affections are bound by so many kind offices. he goes on a business of which you have seen much mention in the public papers. age and ill health having...
My grandson, Th: Jefferson Randolph, bearer of this letter being on a journey to the North, I could not permit him to pass thro’ Washington, without enjoining on him the duty of paying his respects to you. I presume he will find you approaching the close of your winter’s campaign, a term as welcome to the civil as military officer. I am glad to avail myself at the same time of the occasion of...
Your letter of the 8 th was recieved the day before yesterday, and as the season for engrafting is passing rapidly by I will not detain the apple-cuttings for mr Gray, until I may have other matter for writing a big letter to you. I send a dozen cuttings, as much as a letter can protect, by our 1 st mail, and wish they may retain their vitality until they reach him. they are called the...
Your two favors of Feb. 25. and Mar. 11. have been recieved. age and ill health rendering me unequal to the care of my own affairs they have been for some time committed to the management of my grandson Thomas Jefferson Randolph. to him therefore the matter of the Lottery has been so entirely confided, that I am uninformed of the measures taken in it. he is now absent on a journey but is...